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Alvin Stardust

User
Posted 23 October 2014 19:05:49(UTC)
Just read that Alvin Stardust has died from metatastic prostate cancer. 70's icon and kept on performing till the end as he was performing on Saturday evening

Rip Alvin

Bri
User
Posted 28 October 2014 08:42:22(UTC)

Steve I know exactly where you are coming from. Our tipping points do change with this dx. You can feel ok with the world but then you read, see or hear something and things can change in an instant.

The G7 in the article sounds more dramatic as it states the scoring ranges from 2 to 10. As we know in this country anything below 6 is discounted. That 7 doesn't sound half as bad when the range is 6 to 10 :)

Having said that the article about Alvin was to promote awareness. His wife was pointing out that if they had known about it earlier their daughter would still have a father today.

He wasn't able to have the opportunity to have a radical treatment like you and I. We were fortunate that we had an earlier dx that, at the very least, gives us a fighting chance.

Keep your head up and continue to acknowledge that each day you are a step nearer to beating it

take care

Bri

Thanked 2 times
User
Posted 26 October 2014 22:47:57(UTC)
Thanked 1 time
User
Posted 27 October 2014 11:39:31(UTC)

 

Hi Steve. I wasn't surprised. I think because there are so many differences in men and their physical reactions to PC as well as treatment for PC. The article didn't say whether that Gleason was 4+3 or 3+4.

My John's was 3+4 = 7 and eligible for Brachytherapy, having been on Active Surveillance for a year, so the figure 7, whilst not relevant in John's case, has to be viewed in the right context.

The other thing, of course, is that "Years before he’d had a well-man thing done and had his prostate checked,’ says Julie. ‘We were told his PSA [a protein produced by the prostate — raised levels in the blood can be an early indication of prostate cancer] was up a little bit but that it was completely normal in a man of his age"

Alvin apparently didn't have any of the usual symptoms for years so probably put it to the back of his mind.  It serves to emphasise the point that men should ask for a check up. Doctors shouldn't be so blasé about low results.

If raised PSA can be an INDICATION of prostate cancer then what is the harm in ruling it out, or at least repeating the test in a few months time. Of course, if it's just casually mentioned to you that your PSA is a bit high and you have no knowledge of the disease, then you're not going to look for trouble are you?

I can understand your wife being upset Steve, it's a natural reaction. Prostate Cancer appears to be so unpredictable in its form of attack or reaction to treatment. My husband appears to have been able to take the "easy" option. That's not to say it won't change in the future or that the Brachytherapy will work.  We wait until we are told differently. Doesn't stop my mind wandering sometimes to the "What If" scenario.

I can see from your profile Steve that your Gleason was 4+3 with a pretty high PSA (although, as you know, not the highest on here). BUT, you have taken control of your situation and you are being treated.

There is little anyone can say to reassure either your or your wife. As partners we support our other halves to the best of our ability. IT's all we can do.

Be strong, be positive that this treatment is going to work.

Keep coming back here for the odd shoulder to lean on. You already know that there are many on here walking their own path but still prepared to pause and give somebody else a boost.

Best Wishes to both of you.

 

We can't control the winds - but we can adjust our sails
Thanked 1 time
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User
Posted 23 October 2014 22:22:15(UTC)

Bri where did you read this?

BFN

Julie X

NEVER LAUGH AT A LIVE DRAGON
User
Posted 23 October 2014 23:04:55(UTC)

Goog;e it Trevor. It is all over the interweb.

Apparently it had metastasised. Whether or not it had gone undiscovered until recently, who knows? Maybe more information will be forthcoming later.

Dave

User
Posted 23 October 2014 23:09:57(UTC)
Hi Bri,

I was saddened by the news of Alvin.

I had a photo shoot with him about 10 years ago and found he was a really nice guy. We had something in common in that we attended schools very close to each other but in different time periods (he was much older than me). His school and mine were great local rivals on the rugby pitch (not my sport, I'm football, through and through) and we had a great time talking about the local area we'd grown up in (Nottinghamshire).

Really sad to think that another famous name from my past has disappeared.

RIP Alvin.

Steve
User
Posted 24 October 2014 10:06:15(UTC)

I didn't know until someone told me yesterday that Alvin Stardust was originally Shane Fenton the fifties/sixties star. Two incredible incarnations.

User
Posted 24 October 2014 10:36:42(UTC)
Yes I remember when he reinvented himself as Alvin Stardust he denied he used to be called Shane Fenton on Top of the Pops. Remember it well, now where did I leave my keys?

Rip Alvin

Roy
User
Posted 24 October 2014 11:32:18(UTC)

I will add him to Absent Friends under his real name of Bernard William Jewry.

R I P Alvin.

[I still have a Fentone's single.]

Thanks for telling us Brian.


Chris.

User
Posted 24 October 2014 15:31:57(UTC)

We had a power cut yesterday so I couldn't get on to the internet or watch TV. When I managed to google this last night the thing I was most shocked at was his age. I couldn't believe he was 72 , where has the time gone the 70s what fun we had it only seems like the blink of an eye when I was wearing platform shoes.

Another Sad loss to this terrible disease . RIP Alvin

BFN

Julie X

NEVER LAUGH AT A LIVE DRAGON
User
Posted 24 October 2014 21:13:51(UTC)

His mum had the cafe at Wickford rail station - we were all convinced that one day he would appear behind the counter but it never happened.

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard


User
Posted 26 October 2014 22:47:57(UTC)
Thanked 1 time
User
Posted 27 October 2014 09:15:08(UTC)

"Only" a Gleason 7 but it ripped right through him . Damn this disease but full marks to him and his wife for making so much public.

 

Rest in Peace Alvin.

Nil desperandum

Allister
User
Posted 27 October 2014 10:53:53(UTC)
Hi Allister,

Read this last night. Very moving article, especially with my HT. Unfortunately, my wife saw it through another link and is really upset in spite of my reassurance that everything will be ok with me. The Gleason 7 bit was a surprise. Is anyone else a bit shocked by this.

Steve
User
Posted 27 October 2014 11:39:31(UTC)

 

Hi Steve. I wasn't surprised. I think because there are so many differences in men and their physical reactions to PC as well as treatment for PC. The article didn't say whether that Gleason was 4+3 or 3+4.

My John's was 3+4 = 7 and eligible for Brachytherapy, having been on Active Surveillance for a year, so the figure 7, whilst not relevant in John's case, has to be viewed in the right context.

The other thing, of course, is that "Years before he’d had a well-man thing done and had his prostate checked,’ says Julie. ‘We were told his PSA [a protein produced by the prostate — raised levels in the blood can be an early indication of prostate cancer] was up a little bit but that it was completely normal in a man of his age"

Alvin apparently didn't have any of the usual symptoms for years so probably put it to the back of his mind.  It serves to emphasise the point that men should ask for a check up. Doctors shouldn't be so blasé about low results.

If raised PSA can be an INDICATION of prostate cancer then what is the harm in ruling it out, or at least repeating the test in a few months time. Of course, if it's just casually mentioned to you that your PSA is a bit high and you have no knowledge of the disease, then you're not going to look for trouble are you?

I can understand your wife being upset Steve, it's a natural reaction. Prostate Cancer appears to be so unpredictable in its form of attack or reaction to treatment. My husband appears to have been able to take the "easy" option. That's not to say it won't change in the future or that the Brachytherapy will work.  We wait until we are told differently. Doesn't stop my mind wandering sometimes to the "What If" scenario.

I can see from your profile Steve that your Gleason was 4+3 with a pretty high PSA (although, as you know, not the highest on here). BUT, you have taken control of your situation and you are being treated.

There is little anyone can say to reassure either your or your wife. As partners we support our other halves to the best of our ability. IT's all we can do.

Be strong, be positive that this treatment is going to work.

Keep coming back here for the odd shoulder to lean on. You already know that there are many on here walking their own path but still prepared to pause and give somebody else a boost.

Best Wishes to both of you.

 

We can't control the winds - but we can adjust our sails
Thanked 1 time
User
Posted 27 October 2014 11:41:01(UTC)

Focus on the mets. He seemed to have symptoms of mets before he had any tests. His widow has it right: get yourself checked.

User
Posted 28 October 2014 02:35:40(UTC)

Hi Sandra,

Thanks for your message.

However much I try to reassure my wife about my situation it's difficult when you need that reassurance yourself.  Thank you for trying to do that for me.  I've said before on this site, I feel as if I will never be certain of anything in life again but I think being diagnosed with cancer can do that to you.

I'm amazed how my mood can suddenly change from being quite happy to totally opposite because of very minor things.  I have been very low this weekend because of appointment problems connected to my RT (see my "Radical Radiotherapy Starts Today" thread) and reading of Alvin's relatively low Gleason score (7) when I expected it to be much higher.  I can't believe these things affect me so much.  Cancer has changed how I feel in so many ways.  I don't think I will ever be the person I was before. 

Anyway, I'd just like to thank you for taking the time to post your message, it really helped me.

All the best to both of you.

Keep in touch.

Steve

 

User
Posted 28 October 2014 08:42:22(UTC)

Steve I know exactly where you are coming from. Our tipping points do change with this dx. You can feel ok with the world but then you read, see or hear something and things can change in an instant.

The G7 in the article sounds more dramatic as it states the scoring ranges from 2 to 10. As we know in this country anything below 6 is discounted. That 7 doesn't sound half as bad when the range is 6 to 10 :)

Having said that the article about Alvin was to promote awareness. His wife was pointing out that if they had known about it earlier their daughter would still have a father today.

He wasn't able to have the opportunity to have a radical treatment like you and I. We were fortunate that we had an earlier dx that, at the very least, gives us a fighting chance.

Keep your head up and continue to acknowledge that each day you are a step nearer to beating it

take care

Bri

Thanked 2 times
User
Posted 28 October 2014 10:08:40(UTC)

Have emailed you Steve

We can't control the winds - but we can adjust our sails
 
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