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Declaring prostate cancer to DVLA and Insurers

User
Posted 01 February 2015 21:38:43(UTC)

Hi

Diagnosed with prostate cancer on Christmas Eve - officially confirmed as locally advanced prostate cancer on 23rd Jan (following biopsy on 14th Jan) - PSA 330 and Gleason score of 9 - but had fair idea following DRE exam on Christmas Eve - thankfully specialist who carried out DRE didn't have hands the size of that well known goalkeeper - Pat Jennings.  Started course of anti-androgen tablets same day (23rd Jan) and due to have first LHRH injection next week. Work and family very supportive (initially was in a right old state when diagnosed - shock, tears, anger etc but have always been a pragmatist and have now come to terms with what lies ahead).  I am now looking outside my illness and wondering what should I do re notifying DVLA, insurance companies (car and life insurance).

Apologies if these questions are covered in another area but would be grateful for any advice people could give me - many thanks.

Bristol Irish

User
Posted 02 February 2015 07:41:40(UTC)

As far as I'm aware cancer isn't an illness that you have to declare. I completed a driving licence application for my father in law recently and it wasn't among the list of conditions that you should declare.

Life and holiday insurance are different.

Bri

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User
Posted 02 February 2015 17:33:12(UTC)

Lyn

Just after a bit of clarity. If someone is not cureable ie advanced beyond the local area. Are they not terminal?

Bri

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User
Posted 02 February 2015 06:56:36(UTC)
Hi, I was diagnosed Nov 2014, advanced PC. I don't know for a fact however my understanding is that you only need declare anything that impacts your ability to drive if you think it does or if a doctor says it does. I am on a range of tablets and on chemo, some tablets talk about drowsiness etc so the first time I took them I didn't drive to see if there was any impact as a precautionary measure. Clearly taking out any life/travel/health insurance would require disclosure moving forwards. If you are unsure, ask your doctor though as everyone with PC is slightly different. Another way of reassuring yourself is go online and apply for insurance( don't do it though!) and look at the questions, I have done this recently and there was nothing there that I needed to declare, hope that helps, Kev
Dream like you have forever, live like you only have today
Avatar is northern lights whilst running in Iceland sept 2017
User
Posted 02 February 2015 07:41:40(UTC)

As far as I'm aware cancer isn't an illness that you have to declare. I completed a driving licence application for my father in law recently and it wasn't among the list of conditions that you should declare.

Life and holiday insurance are different.

Bri

Thanked 1 time
User
Posted 02 February 2015 12:46:30(UTC)

Bristol Irish

From the DLVA web site.

Car or motorcycle licence

You don’t need to tell DVLA if you have cancer, unless:

  • you develop problems with the brain or nervous system
  • your doctor expresses concerns about your fitness to drive
  • you’re restricted to certain types of vehicles or vehicles that have been adapted for you
  • your medication causes side effects likely to affect safe driving

If you Google "DLVA illness restrictions". 

Insurance companies no doubt have different rules.

I was advised not to drive for one month post RARP.

 

Thanks Chris

User
Posted 02 February 2015 12:57:08(UTC)

There is no need to tell your life insurer either. However, if you had been diagnosed as terminal rather than advanced, it may have been different as some life policies pay out early if the prognosis is less than 12 months. Happily, you do not seem to fall into this category but it is certainly worth considering for others who do find themselves in that situation - the extra money can help partners or other family members to take time off work, for example.

I guess you have realised that you won't be able to get any new life insurance/critical illness cover or apply for a new mortgage?

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard


User
Posted 02 February 2015 15:05:27(UTC)

Hi, we did phone the life insurance broker, he said no need to let them know. My partner is a farmer and has a shotgun licence, he had to renew that recently and you have to state if you have cancer, he was worried they may take his gun away, but it wasn't a problem either.

User
Posted 02 February 2015 17:33:12(UTC)

Lyn

Just after a bit of clarity. If someone is not cureable ie advanced beyond the local area. Are they not terminal?

Bri

Thanked 1 time
User
Posted 02 February 2015 23:59:06(UTC)

Technically not Bri

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard


User
Posted 03 February 2015 10:14:34(UTC)

We asked about the 'terminal' classification at the hospital. Tony's (advanced) cancer is not cureable but is not going to kill him for - hopefully - several years yet. It's largely a matter of semantics, but you do need to have an answed when, say, a travel insurer asks whether you have received a terminal prognosis. Both the oncologist and the nurse said, no, this was not the case yet. He is not 'end-stage' and is very treatable. I think terminal is more apt when you know you have only months to live and no further treatment will help.

I really don't know whether that's how an insurance company interprets it; all we can do is anwer questions honestly, and explain that there are no clear answers to some of them. That's how we're taking it for now, anyway. I'd be interested to hear if anyone else has further thoughts on this.

User
Posted 03 February 2015 11:45:50(UTC)

Yes, medics and insurance companies tend to use 'terminal' to describe someone for whom there is no more treatment of the cancer (only treatment of the side effects or to keep them comfortable) who could reasonably be expected to die within 6 months. Some life insurers will pay out if a medic says the patient has less than 12 months and I think the DWP uses 12 month life expectancy as the benchmark for benefits?

I am trying to think who it was on here who managed to get the prognosis, receive the payout and then take huge satisfaction in staying well and outliving all predictions!

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard


User
Posted 03 February 2015 17:38:10(UTC)

Lyn, could that have been Old al, he went well after THEY said he would.

Chris.

User
Posted 03 February 2015 18:55:54(UTC)

No, I don't remember Al Talking about finances. I think it was one of our female posters as I can recall the discussion about how to protect her man from the distress of actively seeking a terminal prognosis while keeping him up and positive enough to keep fighting rather than lose hope and give in. I can remember being in awe of her capacity to cope.

Thinking about it, could have been Janet or Lynn (Mrstommofire) ???

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard


User
Posted 03 February 2015 20:49:03(UTC)

Hi all

Thank you for your advice - very much appreciated.  Will check with my doctor/hospital re the driving insurance question and will speak directly to my life insurance company as am sure they will want to review me as a risk now that I have been diagnosed with prostate cancer.  At the hospital I was told that, although my cancer cannot be cured, it is treatable.  At no stage was the word terminal used but, as piglet said "It's largely a matter of semantics".  Some will argue that a condition that cannot be cured is terminal but I subscribe to the view that terminal means having only 6 to 12 months left to live and I determined to survive for many years to come.

Keep smiling

Bristol Irish

User
Posted 04 February 2015 05:10:37(UTC)
Hi BI, I am "lucky" enough to have about 4 life policies with " terminal illness" benefit written in from various companies which pay out when prognosis is deemed to be 12 or in one case 18 months or less. When I was first diagnosed and urologist used the word "terminal" I then saw the oncologist who actually ( and most reassuringly) laughed when I asked if he would sign off on them as despite being T4M1N1a he said that we should be thinking 5+ probably nearer 10 without any further advancement in drugs etc so not only can the life companies hang on to their cash a bit longer I will also be here for many years to come which pleased me no end, I don't see that as semantics ( and I don't care if I am technically wrong) as staying positive and therefore doing positive things (diet/ exercise/ good sleep/ general rest/ raising money for PC Uk ( I have now exceeded £6k on my marathon just giving site)) wiil make me as strong as I can be to be here for a better way forward for me. I know I have deviated from the original question but I don't see how the above makes me any more risk than most and certainly less tha a tired parent on a school run with 6 kids in the back of their Zafira!! Today is a good day despite R2 chemo yesterday, I will be going for a run shortly too.
Dream like you have forever, live like you only have today
Avatar is northern lights whilst running in Iceland sept 2017
User
Posted 04 February 2015 20:43:03(UTC)

Great post Kev....all the best for tomorrow

Bri

 
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