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Injection intervals

User
Posted 17 December 2016 10:31:59(UTC)

My father had his first injection the other week and is due for his next one on the 29th December. However, we were told that this can either be monthly or quarterly but I can't find any information about what the difference or benefits are i.e. why not just have it quarterly rather than monthly and therefore easier to plan things in your life i.e. holidays etc.

User
Posted 18 December 2016 17:51:25(UTC)

I didn't think you would be getting the injection at the hospital. I just thought that I wouldn't trust a GP practice nurse to know whether you should go early or late whereas the onco or nurse specialist at the hospital will tell you which way is safest.

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard


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User
Posted 18 December 2016 17:52:40(UTC)

I've got the nurse specialist's number so I'll give her a call in the morning.

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User
Posted 17 December 2016 13:43:12(UTC)

Some feel monthly gives less severe side effects.i stayed on 12 weekly
A disadvantage is getting the appointment on time especially nowadays.

Ray

User
Posted 17 December 2016 17:05:10(UTC)

I think in the early days many prefer to have monthly injections so that, if they find the side effects too severe, they don't have to wait so long to get the chemicals out of their system. Once he knows how they affect him the 3 monthly injection probably makes more sense.

Check though whether he is on the injection that is monthly/3 monthly or 4/12 weekly ... it is very very important if he is on the 4 or 12 weekly one that he does have them at exactly those intervals. Some practice nurses don't know that and assume that monthly / 3 monthly will be fine. Which hormone is he on?

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard


User
Posted 17 December 2016 18:26:19(UTC)
Both are equally effective, both have similar side effect profiles.

But they stay in your system much longer than the stated period (allows for maintaining the minimum therapeutic level on the 28th / 84th day.

So if your father really had a problem with the medication, better to start on the 28-day, to limit the problem!

After that, for most people (if not all, but I haven't dug that deep!), the 12-week version is just as effective, but more economical for the NHS, and less limiting for your father.
-- Andrew --

"I intend to live forever, or die trying" - Groucho Marx
User
Posted 18 December 2016 08:59:04(UTC)

Originally Posted by: Online Community Member

I think in the early days many prefer to have monthly injections so that, if they find the side effects too severe, they don't have to wait so long to get the chemicals out of their system. Once he knows how they affect him the 3 monthly injection probably makes more sense.

Check though whether he is on the injection that is monthly/3 monthly or 4/12 weekly ... it is very very important if he is on the 4 or 12 weekly one that he does have them at exactly those intervals. Some practice nurses don't know that and assume that monthly / 3 monthly will be fine. Which hormone is he on?

So with the intervals they need to be exactly 4 weeks (or 12 weeks for the quarterly one) apart?

His first was on the 28/11/16 and his next is on the 28/12/16 and therefore 30 days instead of the 28 days you're suggesting.

Should I get him to change this? Obviously because of Boxing Day, the 26/12/16 would be ruled out anyway.

p.s. Not sure what hormone he's on. I'll ask him and note it down here later on.

 

User
Posted 18 December 2016 13:53:45(UTC)

No that wasn't what I meant - it really depends on which hormone he is on.

Zoladex 28 days / 84 days
Degarelix (Firmagon) 28 days (although PCUK leaflet says monthly which I think is a typo)
Prostap monthly / 3 monthly

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard


User
Posted 18 December 2016 14:42:39(UTC)

It's Decapeptyl (3mg) which is every 28 days so he won't be able to get his next one on 28 days, as that's Boxing Day, so I should try to change his appointment from his current 30 days to 29 days and from then on every 28 days.

User
Posted 18 December 2016 15:05:44(UTC)

I would call the nurse specialist at the hospital or your onco's secretary to ask whether it should be given on Christmas Eve or 27th December.

The nurse who would have been giving the injection should know that some drugs must be given exactly 28 days apart rather than monthly ... but of course it may not be the nurse's error, it could be administrative staff that made the appointment :-(

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard


User
Posted 18 December 2016 15:07:14(UTC)

TBH, the injections are administered at his local GP surgery and not the hospital. Umm, not sure who to call now?!

User
Posted 18 December 2016 15:51:46(UTC)
I would phone the g p surgery, explain the situation and emphasise that it is imperative that your father receives the injection on the given day, they should have a letter from the hospital informing them of that. Our surgery is very good about getting the drug( prostap) in and also arranging the injection. Once when I rang a bit late they sorted out for early opening and the nurse to give it to my husband on the day that was stipulated. It is so important that you be assertive about this. From that time since I have counted out the days and marked it on the calendar, even highlighting to make an appointment a week or two before the due date, once he gets into a routine it should run smoothly, good luck
User
Posted 18 December 2016 15:57:58(UTC)

Thanks. I'll get in touch with them tomorrow and report back.

User
Posted 18 December 2016 17:51:25(UTC)

I didn't think you would be getting the injection at the hospital. I just thought that I wouldn't trust a GP practice nurse to know whether you should go early or late whereas the onco or nurse specialist at the hospital will tell you which way is safest.

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard


Thanked 1 time
User
Posted 18 December 2016 17:52:40(UTC)

I've got the nurse specialist's number so I'll give her a call in the morning.

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