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Living the dream

User
Posted 17 February 2017 09:46:05(UTC)

Hi Guys,

Yesterday I taught my 6 year old granddaughter how to make porridge, not too hot, not too cold, not too lumpy, not too wet.

Then we went to the park, had a go on the swings and the slide, called in at the toy shop where granddad spent £20 on Lego.

Followed by half an hour building a Lego spaceship while my 4 year old grandson constantly hummed the Star Wars theme tune.

Guess what, the whole day long I didn't think of my PSA level at all.

As we say 'I might have cancer, but cancer hasn't got me' 

:)

Dave

Thanked 8 times
User
Posted 17 February 2017 09:46:05(UTC)

Hi Guys,

Yesterday I taught my 6 year old granddaughter how to make porridge, not too hot, not too cold, not too lumpy, not too wet.

Then we went to the park, had a go on the swings and the slide, called in at the toy shop where granddad spent £20 on Lego.

Followed by half an hour building a Lego spaceship while my 4 year old grandson constantly hummed the Star Wars theme tune.

Guess what, the whole day long I didn't think of my PSA level at all.

As we say 'I might have cancer, but cancer hasn't got me' 

:)

Dave

Thanked 8 times
User
Posted 18 February 2017 11:45:03(UTC)

Hi Barry,

There was a report in the Daily Telegraph 25th January, 'Anxious and depressed people far more likely to die from cancer', citing research by University College London and University of Edinburgh.

If I have copied the link properly it is: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/2017/01/25/anxious-depressed-people-far-likely-die-cancer-study-shows/

Now I am not saying that you can wish your cancer away, but there is lots of evidence that our mood effects our physical health.  Exercise, sunshine and doing things you enjoy changes the levels of various hormones in the body and perhaps that has an effect on our cancers?

It is of course easy to feel sorry for ourselves, why me?  what did I do to deserve this? etc.

However another way of looking at it, is that we should be celebrating living long enough to develop prostate cancers.  I had contemporaries, good friends, who didn't live long enough, one of my best friends at school died aged 12 of leukemia, another in his 20's crashed his car, another in his 30's fell off his motorbike.

So for me, living long enough to teach my granddaughter to make porridge is something to celebrate, and I find focusing on such nice things as that far more enjoyable than wallowing in self-pity.  And if you are struggling to stay positive, it might do good to get some happy pills from your GP?

:)

Dave

 

Thanked 2 times
User
Posted 20 February 2017 01:21:49(UTC)

Hi Guys,

Thank you for the kind words,

Dave you are right '...PCa is not so rapid in its prognosis...', we are at an age when irrespective of PCa we all have to confront our mortality.

I really enjoyed myself on Thursday, a day with the grandchildren is precious, and simple things like making porridge are just wonderful.

But not every day fills me with such glorious thoughts, I have just spent the last two days doing battle with my father-in-laws garden, over the last few years bamboo has encroached from a neighbour's garden, through his flower bed, under the path, into his lawn.  Fighting through thickets of bamboo is something I could have taken in my stride in my youth, but now after two days of it my muscles ache, my joints are stiff, my tendons are sore, and I have to confront the awful truth that I am getting old!

So while I should be feeling happy, contented and proud, because I have done a good deed for my father-in-law, this is spoiled by sadness that I am getting older and weaker, definitely past my prime.

Whatever I can do this year, like DIY, gardening, anything physical, is just going to be more difficult next year, and even more difficult the year after that.

Like most of the guys on this website I don't just have PCa, but also arthritis, high blood pressure, and according to my GP I am borderline diabetic.  Rather like an old car with a dodgy clutch, worn bearings, grinding gearbox and tarnished paintwork, all my bits are starting to decline.

So remaining upbeat is something that isn't always easy. 

So thank God for Eleanor, I am sure the thought of you simpering modestly, sent mine and many more hearts racing.  At our age you can't beat a bit of good old fashioned modest simpering.

Surely that is what life is all about, forgetting all this horrible cancer business, and focusing on the fun things in life?

:)

Dave

Thanked 1 time
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User
Posted 18 February 2017 01:48:43(UTC)

Sensible attitude if for can manage it!

Barry
User
Posted 18 February 2017 11:45:03(UTC)

Hi Barry,

There was a report in the Daily Telegraph 25th January, 'Anxious and depressed people far more likely to die from cancer', citing research by University College London and University of Edinburgh.

If I have copied the link properly it is: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/2017/01/25/anxious-depressed-people-far-likely-die-cancer-study-shows/

Now I am not saying that you can wish your cancer away, but there is lots of evidence that our mood effects our physical health.  Exercise, sunshine and doing things you enjoy changes the levels of various hormones in the body and perhaps that has an effect on our cancers?

It is of course easy to feel sorry for ourselves, why me?  what did I do to deserve this? etc.

However another way of looking at it, is that we should be celebrating living long enough to develop prostate cancers.  I had contemporaries, good friends, who didn't live long enough, one of my best friends at school died aged 12 of leukemia, another in his 20's crashed his car, another in his 30's fell off his motorbike.

So for me, living long enough to teach my granddaughter to make porridge is something to celebrate, and I find focusing on such nice things as that far more enjoyable than wallowing in self-pity.  And if you are struggling to stay positive, it might do good to get some happy pills from your GP?

:)

Dave

 

Thanked 2 times
User
Posted 18 February 2017 14:15:02(UTC)

I'm with you on this one Dave - grandchildren should be be prescribed on the NHS. A day down the beach or tearing around soft-play with my two and my world view completely changes. I'm also completely knackered afterwards but that's a small price to pay I reckon!

Your lovely post reminded me of my grandad who used to make porridge for me while chanting this verse (or something similar)

Stirring round the porridge pot
Round and round and round.
Stirring all the scraith and sloopery,
Round and round and round!

Stirring all the eely droopery,
Round and round and round!

Stirring all the slimy slithery,
Round and round and round!

Stirring all the obbly gubbly,
Round and round and round!

User
Posted 18 February 2017 16:30:36(UTC)

They gave Bob Dylan the Nobel Prize for Literature.

Pffffff!

I'm nominating Eleanor.

User
Posted 18 February 2017 17:44:32(UTC)

Why thank you kind Sir she simpered modestly!

User
Posted 18 February 2017 20:35:45(UTC)

Lovely thread x

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard


User
Posted 19 February 2017 19:42:42(UTC)

Good post, Dave.

Before diagnosis, I used to wonder what it would be like. I imagined that one would be constantly thinking about that and little else. How could you ever concentrate on a book for example knowing what the future holds.

It hasn't turned out to be like that

Admittedly, PCa is not so rapid in its prognosis as other cancers and also, at 71 I may have a different point of view from a younger person, but I'm treating my five year 'notice to quit' as something that, at my age, I should be thinking about anyway- if I can't get everything squared-off in that time, I certainly never would have been able to have done so without PCa.

Best wishes,
Dave

Not "Why Me?" but "Why Not Me"?
User
Posted 20 February 2017 01:21:49(UTC)

Hi Guys,

Thank you for the kind words,

Dave you are right '...PCa is not so rapid in its prognosis...', we are at an age when irrespective of PCa we all have to confront our mortality.

I really enjoyed myself on Thursday, a day with the grandchildren is precious, and simple things like making porridge are just wonderful.

But not every day fills me with such glorious thoughts, I have just spent the last two days doing battle with my father-in-laws garden, over the last few years bamboo has encroached from a neighbour's garden, through his flower bed, under the path, into his lawn.  Fighting through thickets of bamboo is something I could have taken in my stride in my youth, but now after two days of it my muscles ache, my joints are stiff, my tendons are sore, and I have to confront the awful truth that I am getting old!

So while I should be feeling happy, contented and proud, because I have done a good deed for my father-in-law, this is spoiled by sadness that I am getting older and weaker, definitely past my prime.

Whatever I can do this year, like DIY, gardening, anything physical, is just going to be more difficult next year, and even more difficult the year after that.

Like most of the guys on this website I don't just have PCa, but also arthritis, high blood pressure, and according to my GP I am borderline diabetic.  Rather like an old car with a dodgy clutch, worn bearings, grinding gearbox and tarnished paintwork, all my bits are starting to decline.

So remaining upbeat is something that isn't always easy. 

So thank God for Eleanor, I am sure the thought of you simpering modestly, sent mine and many more hearts racing.  At our age you can't beat a bit of good old fashioned modest simpering.

Surely that is what life is all about, forgetting all this horrible cancer business, and focusing on the fun things in life?

:)

Dave

Thanked 1 time
User
Posted 21 February 2017 18:48:12(UTC)
Dave

Bones creak, muscles ache, tendons stretched that bit too far, memory fades, fatigue arrives earlier in the day as the months go by, tasks take longer. All signs cancer as yet to stop us getting older - can't be complaining about them then, but we/I do. Enjoy the porridge, grandkids and all.

Ray
User
Posted 21 February 2017 23:53:56(UTC)

Hi Ray,

I have just read my previous post, and I suppose I am failing to keep to my own script.  I shouldn't moan about being knackered after two days intensive gardening, I should be celebrating the fact that I am still here and fit enough to make a fool of myself with heavy ground work!

I am off to the doctor's tomorrow for my annual blood pressure/diabetes review, they will take blood and unless I am very lucky they will no doubt find something else wrong with me?

My daughter tells me my grandson was sent home from school today, having caught the latest vomiting bug doing the rounds of his class, so my immune system will get tested when I look after him on Thursday.

Now there is a positive from PCa, the Dr Jane Plant diet, with all of the extra garlic, will go some way to protect me from the bug.  I remember the first winter after diagnosis, when I was still at work, everyone in the office except me went down with coughs, colds and flu bugs.  As my boss observed how come the guy with cancer has the best attendance record?

So although I am not always good at it, the secret is to remind ourselves of the positives, PCa did cause me to look at my general health, it did cause me to change my diet, and tomorrow a good Jane Plant veggie curry with extra garlic will give me the protection I need on Thursday?

:)

Dave       

 
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