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Tamsulosin BPH

User
Posted 09 March 2017 13:37:01(UTC)

I've been on Tamsulosin with Finasteride for 20+ years. Most of that time my nocturia has been of the order of 1 to 2 per night. In the last several weeks that has upped to every one and half hours throughout the night. GP has added Betmiga, which I've taken for the last fortnight, with no improvement. On-line says that adding x2 paracetamol to Tamsulosin, greatly enhances its effect with therefore fewer trips to the loo at night. Does anyone have experience of this ?  Thanks

User
Posted 09 March 2017 18:00:12(UTC)

Bumping your post for you Xerxes in the hope that somebody can advise you. You could also consider asking the nurses on this site, who are considered to be very helpful

We can't control the winds - but we can adjust our sails
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User
Posted 09 March 2017 20:55:46(UTC)

X

I was prescribed 5mg solifenacin to help increase my bladder capacity, my consultant upped the dose to 10 mg which I take at night. I have gone from 4/6 night visits to the loo down too no visits or occasionally one visit after a good six hours in bed.

Thanks Chris

 

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User
Posted 15 March 2017 18:22:15(UTC)

Xerxes - I think that Lyn was responding to this rather unhelpful post:

Originally Posted by: Online Community Member

yeah,ignore it and pee yourself.ha ha.

I don't think she was criticising you in any way.

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User
Posted 09 March 2017 18:00:12(UTC)

Bumping your post for you Xerxes in the hope that somebody can advise you. You could also consider asking the nurses on this site, who are considered to be very helpful

We can't control the winds - but we can adjust our sails
Thanked 1 time
User
Posted 09 March 2017 20:55:46(UTC)

X

I was prescribed 5mg solifenacin to help increase my bladder capacity, my consultant upped the dose to 10 mg which I take at night. I have gone from 4/6 night visits to the loo down too no visits or occasionally one visit after a good six hours in bed.

Thanks Chris

 

Thanked 1 time
User
Posted 09 March 2017 22:03:59(UTC)

That sounds really impressive. I wonder what a good night's sleep is like !  I'll check this out with my GP. Thanks

User
Posted 10 March 2017 08:44:24(UTC)

Hi Guys,

What I never understand is that most days I eat healthy and most nights I sit at home watching TV and drinking nothing stronger than green tea.  Depending on how much green tea I drink, I will usually be up once or twice in the night for a pee.

However once in a blue moon I go to the pub have 3, 4 or even more pints of Guinness, and when I get home I sleep like a log all night, and piss like a horse when I wake in the morning.

So the answer to a good nights sleep might be a few pints?

:)

Dave

User
Posted 10 March 2017 09:28:57(UTC)

dave,i have noticed that i am generally up 4 or 5 times a night,but when i have been out for a drink i sleep right through.strange.

User
Posted 10 March 2017 09:40:30(UTC)

Originally Posted by: Online Community Member

So the answer to a good nights sleep might be a few pints?

Like 42, a few pints is the answer to everything. 

User
Posted 10 March 2017 10:09:40(UTC)

Sounds like you both need some bladder re-training. You wake up and think you need to wee so you get up. When you have been drinking, you sleep heavily enough not to be disturbed by the false brain messages.

In most areas, the incontinence nurses run bladder training but the general principles are about learning to ignore the messages and going back to sleep, hence delaying the actual 'getting up' for longer and longer as time goes on.

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard


User
Posted 10 March 2017 13:01:37(UTC)

yeah,ignore it and pee yourself.ha ha.

User
Posted 12 March 2017 10:04:26(UTC)

Bladder training (I've never had any) seems to mean ignore the urge and go back to sleep. If done often enough, this helps with fewer toilet visits. I understand the principle (bit like training my dog to shake hands). My question is, would this increased volume lead to a greater likelihood of acute retention?

User
Posted 12 March 2017 11:06:05(UTC)

Hi Guys,

This reminds me of the old joke that going to the toilet is better than sex.

If you don't believe me, go two weeks without either, and see what you want to do first!

:)

Dave

User
Posted 12 March 2017 16:39:03(UTC)

Obviously I was simplifying. If it was as simple as 'ignore it', CCGs wouldn't waste their money paying specialist nurses to teach it! Bladder training is a real thing and you could perhaps give it a try before discounting its worth?

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard


User
Posted 15 March 2017 17:08:50(UTC)

My question about bladder training was not in any way an attempt to discount its worth, after all, I've never tried it, and only heard about it on this site. rather, my question was whether the process might led to acute retention. It's unfortunate that you were unable to spot a genuine question, rather than spring to the defence of a process that wasn't being attacked. Not too professional !

User
Posted 15 March 2017 18:22:15(UTC)

Xerxes - I think that Lyn was responding to this rather unhelpful post:

Originally Posted by: Online Community Member

yeah,ignore it and pee yourself.ha ha.

I don't think she was criticising you in any way.

Thanked 1 time
User
Posted 15 March 2017 18:40:12(UTC)

Originally Posted by: Online Community Member

My question about bladder training was not in any way an attempt to discount its worth, after all, I've never tried it, and only heard about it on this site. rather, my question was whether the process might led to acute retention. It's unfortunate that you were unable to spot a genuine question, rather than spring to the defence of a process that wasn't being attacked. Not too professional !

 

ColU is absolutely right - I wasn't commenting about your response Xerxes. But just to be clear, none of us on here are professionals ... we are all just people like you, all trying to help each other with the little bit of experience and acquired knowledge we have amassed along our own journeys (or those of our husbands, partners, fathers, brothers). 

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard


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User
Posted 16 March 2017 07:04:25(UTC)

Thank you Lyn. I obviously had the 'wrong end of the stick' there. Your clarification was helpful. Apologies  Xerxes

 
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