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Cycling?

User
Posted 16 March 2017 20:32:19(UTC)

Hi,

not so active here now as 4 years along my cancer journey, well, I will be on 13 May2017.  My experience of the Robotic Op and subsequent treatment is outdated, as advances continue to be made, thank goodness.

So, here is where I need help.  I was on a course recent,y where I was required to ride a bicycle for about 40 minutes.

Now, I have cycled all my life.  Used to part drive/part cycle to work for many years, cycling 12 to 16 miles each depending on here I parked.

Used to cycle at weekends for fitness, 15 to 20 miles.  I cycled.

I knew in advance I would have to cycle.  I selected my bike.  I got the lid on.  I got the Hi-vis on.  I stood by the bike, for an age. I could not get on the bike. That is when the instructor came to me, and asked if I had a problem.  I told him of my past and the operation, and my "staging".

My diagnosis was initially T2, upgrade after pathology, DAMN YOU PATHOLOGY, to T3, so touching the wall.

I was scared that there may be a stray cancerous cell somewhere in me, somewhere down below, that cycling may dislodge and send around my body

Is that fear irrational?  At the moment I am so fortunate, life is so good.  I do not want to jeopardise that.

dave

Be content with your choice of treatment at the time you make it. Then make the best of every minute, every hour, every day.
User
Posted 17 March 2017 00:42:13(UTC)

Yes that fear is irrational CB ... the warning about cycling is to do with the few months after the op while cycling may (may) prevent recovery of the nerve bundles and erectile function. That's all.

Professional cyclists tend to have a raised PSA but the research showed they were no more likely to get PCa than anyone else - the advice to urologists as a result of that research was that if a man with high PSA is a serious cyclist don't put him through unnecessary biopsies unless there are other indicators.

John has been riding since 7 months post op and had just been told he is in remission. You would have been fine x

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard


User
Posted 17 March 2017 01:32:48(UTC)
Hi CB,
Yes without doubt your fear is irrational but I totally understand because those irrational fears are the hardest to overcome they are the ones that make us freeze and control our innermost thoughts even though we know deep down that they don't make sense we still find it hard to ignore them.
Have you cycled at all since diagnosis?
BFN
Julie X
NEVER LAUGH AT A LIVE DRAGON
User
Posted 17 March 2017 18:59:55(UTC)

LOL,

Good evening,

Thank you Lyn, and Julie.

Never have I been so pleased to be told that my reaction was irrational!

Thank you. When I could not get on the bike, I felt myself shaking, my pulse racing. Overwhelming fear.

Now maybe I can get my Hybrid out of retirement and enjoy cycling again?

And spin classes.

I have not cycled at all, or sat on a motorcycle or pedal cycle saddle since the operation.

Have a great weekend all. All I need now to complete my week is an England win. ;-)

dave

Be content with your choice of treatment at the time you make it. Then make the best of every minute, every hour, every day.
User
Posted 17 March 2017 19:20:00(UTC)

I hope it is irrational CB I regularly do 20-30 minutes interval training on the static bike in the gym.

Bri

User
Posted 19 October 2017 12:18:08(UTC)

this post has raised something i have wondered about but never discussed

about 3 years before i was diagnosed i started doing spinning classes at least once a week. i had never used a bike since i was in my teens.

I had read that cyclists can have raised psas so did the spinning bring on my cancer? Maybe my thoughts are irrational too!!! I will never know and maybe it was a coincidence.

I have returned to spinning about 2 years ago and my test results have been clear since.

User
Posted 19 October 2017 16:45:05(UTC)

The research in this area has been quite thorough John. What they found was that professional / serious cyclists have a higher PSA but no increased risk of prostate cancer. The issue was that serious cyclists were more likely to be put through unnecessary biopsies etc because of the raised PSA so guidance was issued to British urologists advising them to take the research into consideration when deciding whether to recommend a biopsy to a serious bike rider.

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard


User
Posted 19 October 2017 18:40:57(UTC)

Thanks Lyn Eyre for that information.

 
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