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Vitamin D and Prostate Cancer

User
Posted 16 May 2017 20:12:21(UTC)

An article, linked below, claims links between low levels of Vitamin D and worse cases of Prostate Cancer.  

It suggests that sunshine is the best way to get Vitamin D and next best are supplements.  Vitamin D3 is the one most like the natural version, rather than D2 which is a vegetarian option.  Some foods contain Vitamin D but it's hard to get enough that way.

So you need to protect against sunburn and it suggests it takes half as long as burning to get enough Vitamin D, say bare arms and legs every day for up to 15* minutes at midday in summer in the UK, but all year for just 5* minutes in the tropics.  

*Skin types react differently to the sun and there is a table describing effects.

D3 vitamin tablets are available in Boots for £5.40, is it worth a go?  

I've been quite strong on using suncream as I've had skin cancer.  I'm also concerned in case taking supplements actually has an opposite effect.

https://www.vitamindcouncil.org/health-conditions/prostate-cancer/

 

 

User
Posted 16 May 2017 21:07:24(UTC)

Pete

As soon as I was diagnosed, my consultant put me on a daily aspirin, a daily statin and a daily Vitamin D tablet.

Ulsterman

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User
Posted 16 May 2017 21:41:36(UTC)
I don't think taking vitamin D3 should cause any problems, I had slight bone thinning which my oncologist said may be caused by the hormone treatment i was on. She prescribed Adcal-D3 (calcium and vitamin D) so I'm guessing it isn't an issue to take this supplement.

Arthur
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User
Posted 16 May 2017 21:41:57(UTC)

My husband was diagnosed on 22nd Dec 2016 and started on vitamin d3 on 1st January. This was after reading the ADDaspirin clinical trial ( his tumour was too big to join properly so we picked an arm and joined in anyway).

He opted for the Vitamin D3 and low dose aspirin arm of the trial ( unofficially of course) and he has taken it daily all year.

In addition he is taking tumeric, milk thistle and a tablet combo of brocolli green tea and pomegranate ! He has cut dairy completely and is reducing red meat to an occasional treat.

The aspirin and D3 combo is especially interesting due to the trial.

Before his diagnosis he saw his dad diagnosed with advanced PCa, go through HT. RT and finally chemo before he died after 6 years of treatment in June 3016. He thinks it''s worth a go!

Regards

Clare

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User
Posted 16 May 2017 21:07:24(UTC)

Pete

As soon as I was diagnosed, my consultant put me on a daily aspirin, a daily statin and a daily Vitamin D tablet.

Ulsterman

Thanked 1 time
User
Posted 16 May 2017 21:41:36(UTC)
I don't think taking vitamin D3 should cause any problems, I had slight bone thinning which my oncologist said may be caused by the hormone treatment i was on. She prescribed Adcal-D3 (calcium and vitamin D) so I'm guessing it isn't an issue to take this supplement.

Arthur
Thanked 1 time
User
Posted 16 May 2017 21:41:57(UTC)

My husband was diagnosed on 22nd Dec 2016 and started on vitamin d3 on 1st January. This was after reading the ADDaspirin clinical trial ( his tumour was too big to join properly so we picked an arm and joined in anyway).

He opted for the Vitamin D3 and low dose aspirin arm of the trial ( unofficially of course) and he has taken it daily all year.

In addition he is taking tumeric, milk thistle and a tablet combo of brocolli green tea and pomegranate ! He has cut dairy completely and is reducing red meat to an occasional treat.

The aspirin and D3 combo is especially interesting due to the trial.

Before his diagnosis he saw his dad diagnosed with advanced PCa, go through HT. RT and finally chemo before he died after 6 years of treatment in June 3016. He thinks it''s worth a go!

Regards

Clare

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User
Posted 16 May 2017 21:42:46(UTC)

Interesting Ulsterman.  Did he say you had low Vitamin D, was due to some other condition or standard for him.  Thanks Peter

User
Posted 17 May 2017 09:05:48(UTC)

1. This article is on a web site that exists to promote vitamin D.

2. It's fair to say that people who are vitamin d deficient have worse outcomes than those who have sufficient vitamin D.

3. There is NO evidence that extra vitamin D - over and above the 'normal' range - helps stop cancer / cancer spread

4. vitamin D overdose brings its own problems

5. The best way to get vitamin D is by making your own from sunlight, if you can. This will never lead to overdose.

6. Vitamin D by tablet may be quicker and easier (never cheaper), but can be dangerous.


It's true that many older people in the UK have slightly low or borderline vitamin D levels. So it may be worth asking your GP about it. If you have a deficiency, deal with it. If you don't, save yourself money and anxiety.

.

-- Andrew --

"I intend to live forever, or die trying" - Groucho Marx
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User
Posted 17 May 2017 22:02:48(UTC)

Thanks for the replies.

£5 for 96 days of tablets seems cheap for even a slight possibility of slowing any possible recurrence. There are other possible benefits as well.

Having had 2 skin cancers I wear a lot of suncream which blocks Vitamin D in summer. In winter the sun isn't strong enough to create any.

From the NHS website: 'The new advice from Public Health England is that adults and children over the age of one should consider taking a daily supplement containing 10mcg of vitamin D, particularly during autumn and winter.'

In conclusion I will buy some D3 tablets but use them less than the daily dose.

User
Posted 18 May 2017 11:55:25(UTC)

Pete

I don't know what my levels of Vitamin D were and nor did my urologist.

He believes cholesterol isn't good for PCa and hence the statin.  He believes aspirin has cancer fighting properties.  He also prescribed Vitamin D.  I do what he tells me because he's brilliant and known for being so in this area.

Ulsterman

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User
Posted 19 May 2017 07:23:09(UTC)

Does anyone know if all dairy foods are now best avoided? I had RARP last week and asked about this in hospital but no one seemed to know anything about it.

Thanks and best wishes to everyone on here.

Gordon.

User
Posted 05 November 2017 07:58:57(UTC)
When I was diagnosed (Stage 4) in July 2016 I switched to a vegan diet following advise promoted by Dr Gregor. As I don't have another version of myself to do a comparative study against I cannot for certain say what effect it has had on my trestment; but I know it has done no harm! Today I feel healthier that I've ever felt and have no notable medical/side effect issues at all. I am currently on Zytiga till February and three-monthly hormone therapy.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=pib7TS3yITI
User
Posted 05 November 2017 16:34:32(UTC)

For Gordon

Not answering the query about dairy Gordon and I am Definitely not an expert but you might find this interesting :- the research here is not new but with no negative side effects we are thinking there is no downside risk to the suggested increase in fibre and having a more plant based diet

https://nutritionfacts.org/video/treating-advanced-prostate-cancer-with-diet-part-1/?platform=hootsuite

Hope the recovery is going well.

Clare

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User
Posted 05 November 2017 17:00:41(UTC)

For Pete,

The PROVANT clinical trial still seems to be open ( till the end of December)

http://www.cancerresearchuk.org/about-cancer/find-a-clinical-trial/a-study-of-active-surveillance-aspirin-and-vitamin-d-in-men-with-prostate-cancer-provent#undefined

My husband did not meet the criteria as his cancer was too large and bi lateral but he would have considered joining if not so.

The results will take years I'm sure.

Regards

Clare

User
Posted 22 November 2017 15:01:16(UTC)

Pete

Vitamin D is good for you and cod liver oil is the best way to get it, especially if it is not very pleasant outside. In Canada they recommend increases in Vitamin D during the dark winter months.

Regards

Michael

User
Posted 07 December 2017 21:22:04(UTC)

Pete

This is my first post on here.

I am not aware that any hard evidence exists but I believe good Vitamin D3 levels may slow down PC growth for some individuals. Some oncologists such as Snuffy Myers (easy to search) recommend it but not as a sole measure. I started taking Vitamin D 3 supplements post radical prostatectomy  a few months after I was told I had a positive margin and when my post op PSA stayed at a constant 0.06 level. Within 6 weeks of taking a quite powerful Vitamin D3 supplement each day my PSA dropped to 0.03. At the same time I had also added a Lycopene supplement so I can't say whether either or both had an impact or whether it was pure chance. I also take Pomi T supplements (contains pomegranate, broccoli, tumeric and green tea extracts) and have given up dairy and red meats. My PSA stayed stable for about a year and then has started to gradually edge up so that after about 18 months it is back to the 0.06 level and I will shortly be proceeding to salvage radiation which I had hoped to avoid. I personally feel that the combination has bought me some time but that it is not a substitute for conventional treatments but things can have different impacts on different people. You can have too much Vitamin D3 and so if you take supplements it is wise to have Vitamin D3 blood tests from time to time so you don't overdose. You can do these by post if you want using an NHS laboratory at a cost of around £28 if your GP won't authorise a test (i think they normally will). Hope this helps. Good luck with whatever you decide to do.

 

Chrstophe

 
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