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Recently Diagnosed and Concerned about Diet

User
Posted 11 July 2017 11:19:07(UTC)

I am 63 and have been recently diagnosed with Gleason 3-4.  Diagnosis followed a TURP operation.  I haven't eaten much red meat in the last 20 years, our diet was mostly chicken, fish and vegetarian, my real weakness was cheese.  Following my diagnosis I have cut out all dairy, I use soya milk and soya yoghurt instead and have completely given up cheese.  I have also stopped eating chicken and now only eat fish and vegetables.  I have started eating a can of tomatoes most days.  I have also stopped eating eggs although I keep reading conflicting reports on eggs.

 

My question is this, am I taking this too far or am I doing the right things.  I have read so much about prostate cancer and diet and much of it is contradictory and it is very difficult to know what diet I should be following.  I would be grateful for any advice.

User
Posted 11 July 2017 17:39:19(UTC)

It's all a matter of opinion regarding diet and prostate cancer.

My opinion, for what it's worth, is if diet does indeed impact on the development of prostate cancer, then I should have changed my diet at least 20 years before I was diagnosed.

I didn't. My diet is still the same as it was at the time of diagnosis. Has that helped or harmed me? I have no way of knowing.

There is one certainty though. Prostate cancer hates real beer. Therefore, drink more real beer. 

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User
Posted 11 July 2017 17:24:23(UTC)
Hello Shetland

From what I have read, you seem to be doing all the right things with respect to diet.

A lot of us on here have read up a lot on diet. But as you say it can contradict itself.

All I can add is that some of us use turmeric in soups and in sauces, some of us try to have more cauliflower and broccolii, some of us add supplements such as Pomi T, or drink pomegranate juice, but you need to find a version that is not too high on sugar.

Important that you get your calcium especially if you are on HT as this treatment can weaken bones.

All the best

Alison

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User
Posted 12 July 2017 10:35:06(UTC)

We all know that smoking causes lung cancer.
We all know that someone with lung cancer should stop, even though he has cancer.
We also all know that stopping smoking will neither slow the cancer, not reverse it.
Once you have cancer., you have cancer.
But still, stopping will help him breathe better, be less prone to chest infection, and may prolong his life - though not significantly.

With every cancer, a good diet enables your body to make the best of the treatment, to cope better with recovery, and, yes, perhaps marginally extend life.

But that's  a good diet, not a fad diet. There's nothing wrong with vegetarianism, and if a vegetarian diet suits you, that's fine. But if it doesn't, your body will be weaker and your immune system compromised. Plus, for example,  if you enjoy chicken, cutting it out will be one more misery, one more reminder of your cancer,  with zero evidence of any benefit.

If you are concerned about diet, ask your GP to refer you to a qualified dietitian (it's on the NHS!) and get good solid evidence-based advice to complement your evidence-based medical treatment.

Get the best, don't go through life with your fingers crossed. Quality of life is something people without cancer can take for granted. We who have cancer should make sure we get the best of life while we can!

 

-- Andrew --

"I intend to live forever, or die trying" - Groucho Marx
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User
Posted 11 July 2017 17:24:23(UTC)
Hello Shetland

From what I have read, you seem to be doing all the right things with respect to diet.

A lot of us on here have read up a lot on diet. But as you say it can contradict itself.

All I can add is that some of us use turmeric in soups and in sauces, some of us try to have more cauliflower and broccolii, some of us add supplements such as Pomi T, or drink pomegranate juice, but you need to find a version that is not too high on sugar.

Important that you get your calcium especially if you are on HT as this treatment can weaken bones.

All the best

Alison

Thanked 2 times
User
Posted 11 July 2017 17:39:19(UTC)

It's all a matter of opinion regarding diet and prostate cancer.

My opinion, for what it's worth, is if diet does indeed impact on the development of prostate cancer, then I should have changed my diet at least 20 years before I was diagnosed.

I didn't. My diet is still the same as it was at the time of diagnosis. Has that helped or harmed me? I have no way of knowing.

There is one certainty though. Prostate cancer hates real beer. Therefore, drink more real beer. 

Thanked 6 times
User
Posted 12 July 2017 10:35:06(UTC)

We all know that smoking causes lung cancer.
We all know that someone with lung cancer should stop, even though he has cancer.
We also all know that stopping smoking will neither slow the cancer, not reverse it.
Once you have cancer., you have cancer.
But still, stopping will help him breathe better, be less prone to chest infection, and may prolong his life - though not significantly.

With every cancer, a good diet enables your body to make the best of the treatment, to cope better with recovery, and, yes, perhaps marginally extend life.

But that's  a good diet, not a fad diet. There's nothing wrong with vegetarianism, and if a vegetarian diet suits you, that's fine. But if it doesn't, your body will be weaker and your immune system compromised. Plus, for example,  if you enjoy chicken, cutting it out will be one more misery, one more reminder of your cancer,  with zero evidence of any benefit.

If you are concerned about diet, ask your GP to refer you to a qualified dietitian (it's on the NHS!) and get good solid evidence-based advice to complement your evidence-based medical treatment.

Get the best, don't go through life with your fingers crossed. Quality of life is something people without cancer can take for granted. We who have cancer should make sure we get the best of life while we can!

 

-- Andrew --

"I intend to live forever, or die trying" - Groucho Marx
Thanked 1 time
User
Posted 12 July 2017 16:06:03(UTC)

Shetland, so far so good re your diet!

Now throw in some Pomegranate juice (not the concentrated stuff mixed with other fruit juices), some vit D3 and selenium.

Shan't kill you (unless you choke on the pills) and may, just may give you the edge when keeping those annoying PCa cells under control.

Best of luck.

Roger
User
Posted 12 July 2017 16:42:29(UTC)

Shetland, as you can see, lots of strongly felt conflicting advice out there. What you have to do, is ask what clinically proven, that is to say peer reviewed properly designed large scale trials are there to guide us with good advice. Sorry, but the answer is zilch. My strongly held advice is to listen to your body. What keeps you fit, heart and lungs-wise is moderate exercise and a balanced diet. Follow that and aim to die with PCa rather than of it. If the food and exercise regime is good for your heart, it will be help you fight this cursed disease.

Junk the faddy stuff, aim to enjoy your food (and drink!) of all sorts in moderation and please don't punish yourself with depleted diets.

AC

User
Posted 12 July 2017 17:44:26(UTC)

I found changing my diet after diagnosis was the only thing I could really control myself. Am I a Pomi-t, tumeric, pomegranate, green tea, soya milk, red grape, and (now I read) apple rind junkie? Probably!

Flexi

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User
Posted 13 July 2017 09:42:42(UTC)

Hi Shetland,

I think you are looking at the topics most of us have gone down to study.

Other than the Chicken you have given up, I agree with what you have changed your diet to.

My personal friend & Nutritionalist suggested one such product, Prostate Phytonutrition, my wife then found Pomi-T, and now because of colestrerol changes I have now Cardiace Plus which means I no longer need the first suggested by my Nutritionalist because it duplicates.

Dropped out all red meat, as much processed food as is possible, so its chicken and all the natural veg, loose not packeted, everything washed before cooking, with much tomatoes brocili, tumeric, herbal teas, Alpro milk at 50p a pot, no dairy, but once a week I have a cheese on toast with Worcester Sauce. Love my eggs too & veggy bacon, advacados, limited pomigramite & cranberry juice and real oranges sqwezed.

Despite all that, the consultants dismiss the diet change & appear not interested in that or what alternative tabs I have been taking.

If its not sanctioned by the NHS and NICE as a pharmaceutical drug they appear to just ignore that.

Does seem a bit led by those all powerful drug companies within the NHS but maybe Im a bit cinical.

I list my progress in my profile.

Eat healthily, take regular exercise and keep positive.
See my profile for PSA & my archived thread too.
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User
Posted 13 July 2017 12:35:03(UTC)

Following on from RockerG's comment about consultants dismissing or showing no interest in dietary changes and alternative tablets, I have found some who most positively embraced such changes and on asking them why they had different views to that of their colleagues they all said it was because they had read various papers on the subject and been swayed by what they had read.

They also said that they had seen how positively such changes had made to those patients that had embarked on such changes and although not directly promoting such changes, they would react positively when a patient raised the matter.

I suspect that the rest of the profession who dismiss such ideas either don't read all the Urology papers that are published or they are fearful of the repercussions if they do read them and act on what they learn.

Roger
User
Posted 13 July 2017 13:53:14(UTC)

Post-diagnosis, I started reading about diets and supplements. After the RP, I changed my diet quite notably - reduced red meat, more fish, less dairy. For the rest, my diet was fairly good anyway, fresh veg, almost no processed food (except, of course, bacon) etc. I now also take aspirin and vit D3 daily.

However, when the RT started and the accompanying fatigue, it's back to whatever makes me feel happy. One of my client pays me in very high quality pork products which are too good to miss out on, so that's not helping! I do plan to tidy up my diet again when the numbing fatigue starts to lift. But how much? I don't know, my feeling is as long as my diet is fairly balanced, I'm OK with it. Mostly, it has to be enjoyable otherwise what's the point. Food has always been a big part of my life. I do not want to be focussing on the dreaded PCA for too much time and in too many aspects of my life.

User
Posted 13 July 2017 14:03:21(UTC)

Diagnosed Gleason 8 2004, have a balanced diet which includes red meat and dairy. No supplements. No treatment since 2008. Still here doing fine.

Ray

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User
Posted 25 September 2017 11:51:09(UTC)

Many thanks for all the replies.  Since my original post I have started drinking a glass of pomegranate juice about 5 times per week.  I have just given up soya products as I have now found out they conflict with Levothyroxine which I take for an underactive thyroid.

I have to say I find my diet very depressing, not he red meat, I never eat that anyway.  I miss chicken and cheese.  It is also very difficult when we visit friends and family.

I am very unclear about eggs but at the moment I am avoiding them.

I am uncertain about supplements, I was interested in Selenium but have heard conflicting reports about it.

User
Posted 25 September 2017 14:09:13(UTC)

I've not changed a thing. Nothing. Why make your life even more miserable. In fact if anything I'm enjoying my food and wine even more whilst I still can. Has any health specialist anywhere at any time suggested I alter my diet or eat more or less of anything ?
No !!
Just my own opinion
Best wishes




If life gives you lemons , then make lemonade
User
Posted 25 September 2017 16:38:45(UTC)
If you find your diet depressing, then I feel, it's time to think about what you want or what you fancy. I believe that changes in diet helps the guys with prostate cancer to feel that they have control over their disease but as others say unless the foods or supplements have been stringently researched, peer reviewed and therefore proven it's not worth changing your diet. My husband has such varied levels of appetite from just wanting soup only to fancying a full seafood grill. So I simply go with the flow and eleven years gone we're still going with the flow. I tend to basically follow a Mediterranean type diet, buying organic and growing my own vegetables
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User
Posted 25 September 2017 17:53:12(UTC)

My husband was diagnosed on 22nd December 2016 and on 1st January added low dose aspirin and vitamin D3 to his diet based on this clinical trial that he was ineligible for but seems to be having interesting results.


http://www.cancerresearchuk.org/about-cancer/find-a-clinical-trial/a-study-of-active-surveillance-aspirin-and-vitamin-d-in-men-with-prostate-cancer-provent#undefined

He also has given up dairy and restricted red meat ( he does fab home made sorbets though). He takes Pom-IT too, drinks green tea ( he always did) and pomegranate juice and broccoli and tomatoes are featuring highly. Daily numeric too! Flexi above made me smile as I think my husband may be a supplement junkie too...

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