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Which pads?

User
Posted 12 August 2017 13:50:21(UTC)
Just got home after my prostatectomy and preparing for what's coming.
I've been warned to expect urinary incontinence once the catheter is removed and that I'll need pads or pants of some sort for a while at least.
My question...
What products are good? Which ones should I avoid?
There's so much out there I'm finding it a bit overwhelming.
User
Posted 12 August 2017 19:41:51(UTC)

Hi, I am continually surprised at how the response/help/service from the NHS differs from town to town - why would that be? Bye the by, when I had the catheter taken out the hospital gave me a bunch of No.2 pads and a few No.1 pads. Within days I was contacted by the 'continence clinic' . . . great . . . I thought they were going to teach me how to be continent, NO they just wanted to know how many pads I wanted AND there was no choice, just No.2's. They sent me 6 months supply in the post by DHL! That was 6 months ago and for me (good control by day and inconsistent control at night) the No.2's are the most appropriate because, for me, I am either dry or disaster (at night).

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User
Posted 12 August 2017 19:51:54(UTC)

It's worth having a try at a couple of different options to see what suits you. At this point you won't have much of an idea of how much, if any, leakage you will have.

As a safety measure lay in some pads just in case - probably Tena Level 2 or the Abri-man equivalent would be a good guess, but don't buy too many just yet.... (NB Other brands of pads are available. I don't have any personal financial interest in either of these!!! I have just used them as examples.) Both are stocked in Boots so easily available. If you are relatively dry, go down to level 1. If you flood the pads, go up to level 3. BUT if you have been treated by the NHS, you may be given some basic pads anyway after catheter removal. You will have plenty of time while recovering from the operation to make your mind up as to what is best.

From personal experience, pads are probably the best to start with. For extreme leakage, disposable pants are an option (e.g. Depends) - fine provided you can change them at home. However trying to change them in a toilet cubicle while away from home is a logistic nightmare, even when the floor is dry.

Following on, there are lots of options, but I don't think you need to worry about them just yet.

Please give yourself time to recover after the operation. There is no rush.

Tony

TURP then LRP in 2009/2010. Lots of leakage but PSA < 0.1 AMS-800 Artificial Sphincter activated 2015.
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User
Posted 13 August 2017 07:56:33(UTC)

Hi Fotografics, I'm nearly two months since having my catheter removed ten days post op. Everybody is different continence wise. I was dry at night from the off but during the day I leaked. I use Tena level 2. I was using three a day (including the night just in case). I'm now down to one during the day. I have used Boots own brand but found them to be not as good a fit or as comfortable but that's not to say they don't suit others. Hope this helps.

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User
Posted 12 August 2017 19:41:51(UTC)

Hi, I am continually surprised at how the response/help/service from the NHS differs from town to town - why would that be? Bye the by, when I had the catheter taken out the hospital gave me a bunch of No.2 pads and a few No.1 pads. Within days I was contacted by the 'continence clinic' . . . great . . . I thought they were going to teach me how to be continent, NO they just wanted to know how many pads I wanted AND there was no choice, just No.2's. They sent me 6 months supply in the post by DHL! That was 6 months ago and for me (good control by day and inconsistent control at night) the No.2's are the most appropriate because, for me, I am either dry or disaster (at night).

Thanked 1 time
User
Posted 12 August 2017 19:51:54(UTC)

It's worth having a try at a couple of different options to see what suits you. At this point you won't have much of an idea of how much, if any, leakage you will have.

As a safety measure lay in some pads just in case - probably Tena Level 2 or the Abri-man equivalent would be a good guess, but don't buy too many just yet.... (NB Other brands of pads are available. I don't have any personal financial interest in either of these!!! I have just used them as examples.) Both are stocked in Boots so easily available. If you are relatively dry, go down to level 1. If you flood the pads, go up to level 3. BUT if you have been treated by the NHS, you may be given some basic pads anyway after catheter removal. You will have plenty of time while recovering from the operation to make your mind up as to what is best.

From personal experience, pads are probably the best to start with. For extreme leakage, disposable pants are an option (e.g. Depends) - fine provided you can change them at home. However trying to change them in a toilet cubicle while away from home is a logistic nightmare, even when the floor is dry.

Following on, there are lots of options, but I don't think you need to worry about them just yet.

Please give yourself time to recover after the operation. There is no rush.

Tony

TURP then LRP in 2009/2010. Lots of leakage but PSA < 0.1 AMS-800 Artificial Sphincter activated 2015.
Thanked 1 time
User
Posted 13 August 2017 07:56:33(UTC)

Hi Fotografics, I'm nearly two months since having my catheter removed ten days post op. Everybody is different continence wise. I was dry at night from the off but during the day I leaked. I use Tena level 2. I was using three a day (including the night just in case). I'm now down to one during the day. I have used Boots own brand but found them to be not as good a fit or as comfortable but that's not to say they don't suit others. Hope this helps.

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User
Posted 13 August 2017 10:57:41(UTC)

When I bought them myself then I found Tena level 2 comfortable, but I now get NHS level 4, not so comfortable but free.

Chris.

User
Posted 13 August 2017 16:58:21(UTC)

Further to Nomad's comments, in our area you have to have been incontinent for 6 months to be entitled to any pads on the NHS.

Foto, as well as pads, you might find it a good idea to buy a waterproof sheet or some disposable bed pads. The sheets aren't rubber like in the old days, and are fairly easy to buy from places like Dunelm. John didn't wear pads at night so knowing that the mattress wouldn't get ruined allowed him to feel less worried and therefore to sleep better.

Asda, Tesco and Morrisons regularly do buy 1 get 1 free on Tena - make sure you buy the men's ones not the ladies (it isn't always obvious to a new user that there is a difference) but don't buy loads to begin with as you may not need them for long.

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard


User
Posted 14 August 2017 08:16:49(UTC)

Thanks!
Good advice there. I have no idea what is available on the NHS, I just didn't want to end up getting into a state, not knowing what to get.
Tena, seems to be the make you recommend, so I think I'll start of with those (if I don't get any free from the hospital) and see what develops.
Lynn, the waterproof matress cover is already in place. Not as bad as I was expecting!

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User
Posted 14 August 2017 19:17:13(UTC)
My hubby is permanently incontinent and we only got any thing free while he was continually in need of full pant style pads, he now only leaks (he has a supra pubic catheter) during spasms, possibly 15-20 times a day, that's not enough locally to get free ones! Ah well we do get PIP so can use that to pay for them.the rules locally are very severe. We use Tena by the way.
User
Posted 14 August 2017 20:51:10(UTC)

Again, I repeat myself . . . we have a NHS but it seems clear that we the word National has nothing to do with any form of national standards as (including tenna pads) there is NO standards! Why?

User
Posted 14 August 2017 21:18:02(UTC)

I suppose because each clinical commissioning group has the power (and challenge) of deciding what the priorities are for healthcare in their area, and how best to meet all the needs from a decreasing budget. Some CCGs seem to rate preventive strategies while others just stick with offering the absolute minimum they can get away with.

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard


User
Posted 15 August 2017 15:20:36(UTC)
Like Devonmaid's OH I have a SPC and frequent leaks with the spasms. I wrap a few sheets of loo roll in a nappy liner and change the paper following a small leak, that way I do not soil the pad( provided it is only a small leak). The biggest problem was sourcing nappy liners. I am lucky to be in an area where I get free pads, free Conveen sheaths and leg bags etc. If you have a continence service in your area you can self refer yourself. I also use the tenna 2 pads and when I was traveling around stopping in hotels used tenna 4 pants at night just as a bit of insurance.

Thanks Chris
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User
Posted 20 November 2017 11:02:17(UTC)

Had op 02 Nov (robotic radical prostatectomy). Bit of a shock when catheter removed, only took a couple of Tena pads result was used 2 nhs nbr 4 given 2 nhs nbr 2 was confused. got home was a bit confused 2 weeks on now using Tena Men Premium Fit pants and also Tesco Free Spirit pads Leaking is problem but have it covered with these items just hope it will becomee less and less as these products are not cheap...

 
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