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PSA reading interpretation

User
Posted 01 December 2017 15:10:25(UTC)

I have metastatic prostate cancer that I have been treating with diet and supplements (no sugar of fats or meats, barley grass and MCP, etc).  My Psa has been steadily rising but seems to have speeded up lately.  Now around 6.  My question is when do I need to start really worrying? i had a prostatectomy in 2004 so my PSA originates from cancerous cells.  Anybody else in similar circumstances?

User
Posted 01 December 2017 21:26:53(UTC)

You are having real treatment as well, aren't you?

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard


Thanked 1 time
User
Posted 01 December 2017 22:20:31(UTC)

You say your PSA has been rising and is now speeding up. I assume these figures are being fed back to whoever is monitoring your case in which situation I would have thought you will have been given some idea of what the next treatment option was and when it should take effect. Options could be dependent on what treatments you have had so far.

It's difficult to say at what point you should really start worrying as most men diagnosed with mets would be very concerned already. Others might not feel this so strongly until told there were no further treatment options left to them or somewhere between these points. We have had other members with a gradually rising but then accelerating PSA after quite a number of years after Prostatectomy and have undergone various down the line medical treatments. Some of them have adopted diets believed this might help slow the progress of the disease but I can't recall any man relying exclusively on diet/supplements to slow their cancer advancement.

Barry
User
Posted 02 December 2017 10:21:24(UTC)

Brutal answer ahead. Read at your own risk.

Originally Posted by: Online Community Member
My question is when do I need to start really worrying?

Six months ago, if you are relying on placebos alone.

A Good Diet is great for avoiding certain cancers, but there's not a scintilla of evidence that dietary changes delay / slow down / cure an existing cancer. If that were the case, smokers could reverse lung cancer by packing it in and breathing extra Fresh Air.

Time to get referred back to medical science. Now.

-- Andrew --

"I intend to live forever, or die trying" - Groucho Marx
User
Posted 02 December 2017 15:41:28(UTC)

Thanks for replying.  No I have not had any other medical treatments.  And I do not have a doctor monitoring my situation.  I did go to an oncologist a couple of times and they do not have any treatment available to me.  Because my PSA is over 2.0 radiation is not an option and from what I have read, chemotherapy or drugs only help for around 2 years and then you lose control and die quickly.  Diet and supplements have worked well for me for 13 years however, I am getting a little concerned now.  I am thinking of colloidal silver and DMSO as well as Rick Simpson's Oil.  What do you think.  As well, do you think an oncologist can help my situation, and how?

Thanked 1 time
User
Posted 03 December 2017 01:11:41(UTC)

You have done well so far but not necessarily and most probably not because of diet and snake oil. Indeed many men live a long life not even knowing they have PCa but die of something else. In other cases PCa can both mutate and spread elsewhere and become a serious problem over the years. If you are having PSA tests but these are not being followed or acted on what is the purpose of them? If mets are few it might be possible to treat with radiation along with the prostate bed. There are a variety of treatments that can be adopted. Some work longer for some men than others so at some point an alternative may have to be tried. We are at a disadvantage here, we are not doctors and lack your complete diagnosis and histology. But from what you have told us, I agree it would be sensible to see an oncologist soonest. He/she might well want to have a new MRI scanto access your present situation before suggesting individualized treatment(s).

Barry
User
Posted 03 December 2017 10:31:17(UTC)

I share your doubts about chemo 100%, but we're each unique, and it's a variable situation. When my turn comes, I shall see the oncologist and try to get straight answers. Personally, I wouldn't accept the treatment on a "2 year Deal", but neither would I seek quack therapies. 

Once there's no real prospect of treating the disease, I'll concentrate on living to the full while I can. And I'd stop having PSA tests straight away. There's always hospice care at the end - and it's excellent for the majority. And If my symptoms refuse to be managed, then  there's the Swiss Solution or a DIY equivalent.

Once the day comes that I have to accept it's 'downhill all the way', the up side is I'll be free of worrying about it; there'll be no point.

-- Andrew --

"I intend to live forever, or die trying" - Groucho Marx
User
Posted 03 December 2017 18:44:23(UTC)
A similar situation to my husband but he’s had a number of high contrast CT scans and bone scans to check if in fact the cancer had metastised but no his various scans were clear. But and it’s a big but, he has been having hormone therapy and he has survived for ten years since his RP. I can’t emphasise that his survival is down to medical treatment and close monitoring by the oncologists, his oncologist is vehement about quality of life and advocates a good, sensible diet. But there is absolutely no evidence to support this treatment. I strongly recommend that you go back to your oncologist and have a long talk.
User
Posted 03 December 2017 19:48:41(UTC)

Thanks again to all for your replies.  I think Barry's suggestion of an MRI is wise.  However, a CAT SCAN is out of the question as they rely on too much radiation.  I'm glad to hear that someone has survived for 10 years and counting on hormone therapy, and the advice on seeing an oncologist to discuss my options will certainly be considered.  

I know that diet and supplement has not been scientifically proven to be effective however I am certain that it has helped me survive thus far.  I take monthly PSA tests in order to see how my diet is affecting the readings.  Sugar and fats and any processed foods shoots my PSA up.  And believe it or not, I have brought my PSA levels down a bit by just maintaining a strict vegetables and grains diet.  However, this is hard and I tend to "treat" myself once in awhile and pay a price for it.  Without a doubt, diet and certain supplements has extended my life thus far.

That said, it is time to consider other options.  Thank you all.

User
Posted 08 January 2018 00:15:32(UTC)

Great philosophy, Andrew. Live life sensibly; eat, drink and exercise in moderation and not die of worrying about what might or might not have happened if we had chosen differently. 

Tony

 

 
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