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Dad diagnosed this morning

User
Posted 27 Jun 2018 at 14:20

Hi, 

My dad has been diagnosed this morning, his PSA was 134...I'm not really sure what this means?? 

They are checking to see if it's gone into the bone. Hes booked in for an MRI, ultrasound and biopsy, will we know more after this? 

If it is in the bone, what does this mean? 

Sorry for all the questions, were all just so shocked and confused still! He only went to the doctors initially 2 weeks ago and today at the hospital they almost started treatment immediately. This obviously isn't a good sign and I can't help but think the worst!! 

Any advice would be great. 

Thank you 

User
Posted 27 Jun 2018 at 15:14

Hi Emma,

Sorry you join us due to concern about your Dad's situation. Whilst we have had many men join us with a much higher PSA, unfortunately, his PSA is at a level where the chance of it being PCa is very high. Much will now depend on what is gleaned from Biopsy, MRI, etc.

Dad is being checked out expediously which is good. Perhaps we should not try to second guess what his treatment will be if PCa is confirmed as although HT is frequently a starting point other forms of supplementary or alternative treatment are sometimes given according to circumstances.

Some men live many years after a PCa diagnosis even when it is in their bones (which has yet to be confirmed in your Dad's case). Also, further down the line treatments are being introduced or are in development so try to remain optimistic.

Many men find it helpful to download or obtain a hard copy of the 'Toolkit' available from the publications section of this charity. It provides good information about PCa and treatments.

If you post Dad's full diagnosis and treatment plan when this is known, we will be in a better position to answer questions.

Edited by member 27 Jun 2018 at 15:18  | Reason: Not specified

Barry
User
Posted 27 Jun 2018 at 16:44

Hi Emma, 

Yes it does come as a shock and you can read all sorts of things, some can make you worry more, and others less.  There is a lot to take in.  The psa test is only indicative and true diagnosis comes with scans and biopsies.   Even then it can be found to be different if they remove the prostate.

So in reality there are no hard and fast rules and plenty of people do a lot better than expected. 

You've given your age, the age of your dad would be relevant in what people want to say, although at this time maybe you're feeling in need of thought and this group will offer that help as well, as will Prostate Cancer UK.

Even in a bad case you'll have your dad around for a good few years and in most cases a lot longer.  Don't dwell on bad stories, unfortunately it's bound to be that those who don't have a problem don't write much and so you can get a more worrying view from people's stories on the internet. The internet  is the best place to find out things if you read mainly like Prostate cancer UK or other reputable research organisations and recall that people's stories are possibly a worse picture than the total picture.

Regards

Peter

Edited by member 27 Jun 2018 at 16:45  | Reason: typo

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User
Posted 27 Jun 2018 at 15:14

Hi Emma,

Sorry you join us due to concern about your Dad's situation. Whilst we have had many men join us with a much higher PSA, unfortunately, his PSA is at a level where the chance of it being PCa is very high. Much will now depend on what is gleaned from Biopsy, MRI, etc.

Dad is being checked out expediously which is good. Perhaps we should not try to second guess what his treatment will be if PCa is confirmed as although HT is frequently a starting point other forms of supplementary or alternative treatment are sometimes given according to circumstances.

Some men live many years after a PCa diagnosis even when it is in their bones (which has yet to be confirmed in your Dad's case). Also, further down the line treatments are being introduced or are in development so try to remain optimistic.

Many men find it helpful to download or obtain a hard copy of the 'Toolkit' available from the publications section of this charity. It provides good information about PCa and treatments.

If you post Dad's full diagnosis and treatment plan when this is known, we will be in a better position to answer questions.

Edited by member 27 Jun 2018 at 15:18  | Reason: Not specified

Barry
User
Posted 27 Jun 2018 at 16:44

Hi Emma, 

Yes it does come as a shock and you can read all sorts of things, some can make you worry more, and others less.  There is a lot to take in.  The psa test is only indicative and true diagnosis comes with scans and biopsies.   Even then it can be found to be different if they remove the prostate.

So in reality there are no hard and fast rules and plenty of people do a lot better than expected. 

You've given your age, the age of your dad would be relevant in what people want to say, although at this time maybe you're feeling in need of thought and this group will offer that help as well, as will Prostate Cancer UK.

Even in a bad case you'll have your dad around for a good few years and in most cases a lot longer.  Don't dwell on bad stories, unfortunately it's bound to be that those who don't have a problem don't write much and so you can get a more worrying view from people's stories on the internet. The internet  is the best place to find out things if you read mainly like Prostate cancer UK or other reputable research organisations and recall that people's stories are possibly a worse picture than the total picture.

Regards

Peter

Edited by member 27 Jun 2018 at 16:45  | Reason: typo

User
Posted 27 Jun 2018 at 17:22

Thank you both so much for your replies!

You've really put all of our minds at ease and we feel we understand a lot more now. 

Dad is 59 by the way, realised I never included it 

User
Posted 11 Sep 2018 at 08:41

Hi there

As others have said - wait until you have the full picture. Yes, it is frightening at first but a lot of advancements in treatment are being made.

My PSA at diagnosis was 659 (at age 65) and a bone scan revealed metastases (spread) to ribs, lower spine and pelvis - that was in June 2012.

I don't have a Gleason score (but it would be up there with the best/worse) as a biopsy was deemed inappropriate for me. I have had 6 years plus of hormone therapy (quarterly injections), put on about two stones in weight and suffer the occasional mild hot flush. My last PSA reading was 0.84 although the trend is upward. I am living life to the full.

We are all different and treatment is tailored to what is most applicable to each patient. I am living proof that that a high PSA is not the immediate death sentence that may first spring to mind.

 

Boroboy

Edited by member 11 Sep 2018 at 08:42  | Reason: Not specified

 
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