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Immunotherapy

User
Posted 31 Jul 2016 at 21:34
There is a new type of treatment being developed that is called immunotherapy where a cancer cell is retrained to attack existing cells and there is a 90%success rate where terminally ill patients have had all their symptoms and cancer simply vanish.

This is being developed at Cambridge university. There is a video explanation on AJ+ and it could be a move in the right direction for all cancer sufferers.

Chris/Woody

Life seems different upside down, take another viewpoint
User
Posted 01 Aug 2016 at 21:33
Chris
work ongoing at Glasgow University for this too, As far as I am aware it is only being trialled on blood or "liquid" cancers at the momennt. This and targeted biological therapies seem to offer a lot of hope.

xx Mo
User
Posted 04 Aug 2016 at 01:48

To do justice to your question would take a lengthy reply and  I will just give a short if inadequate view on it. Great Britain has an enviable record of research and innovation in many fields and even now punches above it's size with regard to medical research.  It is particularly galling when one considers discoveries and developments here are sometimes introduced in other countries long before being made available to NHS patients. It can also take a seemingly inordinate time for GB to adopt cutting edge advances from the USA who are able to employ considerable men and resources in this area, as well as contributions from other countries.  Why is this - probably a combination of reasons?  Some of these are no doubt due to the lack of will and drive of successive Governments, often due to monetary constraints and too low priority.  NICE not only does the Government's bidding but is slow in coming to decisions - sometimes waiting  exceedingly long in considering new/improved treatments/drugs.  As well as deciding whether a treatment offers good value on a cost effective basis, there is a reluctance to approve new treatments until trials and follow ups also show there to be no or minor side effects/adverse outcomes. 


Forum members may recall the case of Ashya King whose parents took him to Prague for Proton treatment for remnants of a brain tumour that could not be completely removed by his surgery.  Thankfully, he is doing well.  In fact a number of people - mainly young - have had UK funding for treatment in the USA to have Proton Beam for brain tumours.  But the decision to go ahead with the two Proton Beam facilities at UCLH in London and The Christie in Manchester was put on the back burner by Governments, so now some years beyond original projected commissioning.  This this an example of us  lagging behind due to Government policy.     

Barry
User
Posted 04 Aug 2016 at 07:16
My dad who has P/C lives in a small sleepy village in Northumberland which is a five minute drive from this state of the art facility although not yet completed, although proton beam therapy may or may not be of benefit to P/C sufferers ? It' will hopefully be of help to others (and it's amazing for this to be built near where we live !!
Revolutionary cancer treatment to be brought to Northumberland village as a private centre unveils plans to open

732
SHARES

Proton Partners International brings proton beam therapy to Earth Balance near Bedlington
A village just outside Bedlington in Northumberland is today unveiled as the site of the first multimillion pound Proton Beam Therapy cancer treatment centre to be built in England.

The centre will be situated on the Earth Balance wellness suite in Bomarsund, and will operational by early 2017.

The multi-million pound facility, which will be able to treat up to 700 patients annually, will be one of only three proton beam therapy centres in UK to offer the treatment used to help brain cancer survivor Ashya King.

Proton Partners International Ltd is to open the centre, with similar treatment facilities planned for Cardiff and London. The Northumberland base will be available for NHS patients from England, Scotland and Wales, medically-insured private patients and self-paying patients.


Councillor Grant Davey, leader of Northumberland County Council, said: “We are delighted Northumberland has been chosen as the first place in England to be able to provide high energy Proton Beam Therapy. This is not only good news for the county – it will provide a great economic boost to the whole region and highlight our commitment as a place to invest for the future.”

Proton Beam Therapy has had a high profile in recent months following the controversial case of five-year-old Ashya King.

The youngster’s parents, Brett and Naghmeh King, sparked an international manhunt after taking their sick son out of hospital in Southampton without doctors’ consent. He later received successful treatment at the Proton Therapy Centre (PTC) in Prague.

Chairman of Earth Balance, Alan Rutherford said: “We are delighted that Proton Partners are coming to the site and we are working hard with local healthcare partners, energy partners, health and wellbeing partners and the local community to ensure that the training and care opportunities are meeting local needs.”

Earlier this year, the Government has announced that it is to create two NHS proton beam therapy units which will open in 2018.

Gordon McVie, chairman of Proton Partners International Ltd, said: “Our goal is to herald a new era of cancer care provision in the UK, bringing the first high energy Proton Beam Therapy centres to the UK and therefore unveiling our site today marks another significant milestone.

“It is estimated that around 10% of patients who receive radiotherapy would be better treated by Proton Beam Therapy. Across the world Proton Beam Therapy has been shown to deliver significant results for patients, especially in lowering side effects. The sooner we can start treating patients in the UK the better.”
The only time you should look back is to see how far you have come
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User
Posted 31 Jul 2016 at 21:49

Hi Chris/ woody,
Where did you get this info from, can you post some details.
Thanks Leila X

User
Posted 31 Jul 2016 at 22:25

Massive successful trials here in Southampton , but not yet for prostate cancer alas


If life gives you lemons , then make lemonade
User
Posted 01 Aug 2016 at 06:33
Chris,

I came across this too and think it's great that there is constant research going on to help all cancer patients. Let's hope trials can be extended to PCa too.

John
User
Posted 01 Aug 2016 at 07:29

There is information about immunotherapy on cancer research/immunotherapy. I saw a short video from AJ+ and they mentioned research going on at Cambridge Uni and on Cancer research site they mention research at Southampton Uni and also Leeds Uni.

It is obviously ongoing work but they are having great success with it. Out of 29 terminally ill patients treated 27 of them had their symptoms completely disappearing. I wonder how long before the technique is adapted for us with PCa. At Southampton they are doing trials on patients with Lymphoma.

I expect there is lots more to add to this but there is hope for a new fast and cost effective treatment in the future for everyone with all cancers.

Research is amazing, long may it continue.

Regards Chris/Woody

Life seems different upside down, take another viewpoint

User
Posted 01 Aug 2016 at 21:33
Chris
work ongoing at Glasgow University for this too, As far as I am aware it is only being trialled on blood or "liquid" cancers at the momennt. This and targeted biological therapies seem to offer a lot of hope.

xx Mo
User
Posted 02 Aug 2016 at 12:18

Thanks Mo, I thought that at least what little information that comes to light by whatever means can only be good and Hopeful for those in the future that have any of the cancers and I am sure that the trials will spread to other types of cancer.

I was interested to read what is on cancer research site about immunology and also a general sweep of Dr Google adds to the knowledge bank.

Long live research.

Chris / Woody

Life seems different upside down, take another viewpoint

User
Posted 03 Aug 2016 at 00:34

Not sure if it's quite the same but immunotherapy for PCa is being used for some in the USA http://www.cancercenter.com/prostate-cancer/immunotherapy/

Barry
User
Posted 03 Aug 2016 at 07:37

Thanks Barry. It is the same principal as what is being done here in GB but looks like they are actually using a tried and tested manufacturers product.

What's happening with the NHS, they could be trailing this themselves or maybe they are waiting for a home grown version that will take donkey's years to develope and put into use after NICE put their brakes on it as well.

Cheers Chris/Woody

Life seems different upside down, take another viewpoint

User
Posted 04 Aug 2016 at 01:48

To do justice to your question would take a lengthy reply and  I will just give a short if inadequate view on it. Great Britain has an enviable record of research and innovation in many fields and even now punches above it's size with regard to medical research.  It is particularly galling when one considers discoveries and developments here are sometimes introduced in other countries long before being made available to NHS patients. It can also take a seemingly inordinate time for GB to adopt cutting edge advances from the USA who are able to employ considerable men and resources in this area, as well as contributions from other countries.  Why is this - probably a combination of reasons?  Some of these are no doubt due to the lack of will and drive of successive Governments, often due to monetary constraints and too low priority.  NICE not only does the Government's bidding but is slow in coming to decisions - sometimes waiting  exceedingly long in considering new/improved treatments/drugs.  As well as deciding whether a treatment offers good value on a cost effective basis, there is a reluctance to approve new treatments until trials and follow ups also show there to be no or minor side effects/adverse outcomes. 


Forum members may recall the case of Ashya King whose parents took him to Prague for Proton treatment for remnants of a brain tumour that could not be completely removed by his surgery.  Thankfully, he is doing well.  In fact a number of people - mainly young - have had UK funding for treatment in the USA to have Proton Beam for brain tumours.  But the decision to go ahead with the two Proton Beam facilities at UCLH in London and The Christie in Manchester was put on the back burner by Governments, so now some years beyond original projected commissioning.  This this an example of us  lagging behind due to Government policy.     

Barry
User
Posted 04 Aug 2016 at 07:16
My dad who has P/C lives in a small sleepy village in Northumberland which is a five minute drive from this state of the art facility although not yet completed, although proton beam therapy may or may not be of benefit to P/C sufferers ? It' will hopefully be of help to others (and it's amazing for this to be built near where we live !!
Revolutionary cancer treatment to be brought to Northumberland village as a private centre unveils plans to open

732
SHARES

Proton Partners International brings proton beam therapy to Earth Balance near Bedlington
A village just outside Bedlington in Northumberland is today unveiled as the site of the first multimillion pound Proton Beam Therapy cancer treatment centre to be built in England.

The centre will be situated on the Earth Balance wellness suite in Bomarsund, and will operational by early 2017.

The multi-million pound facility, which will be able to treat up to 700 patients annually, will be one of only three proton beam therapy centres in UK to offer the treatment used to help brain cancer survivor Ashya King.

Proton Partners International Ltd is to open the centre, with similar treatment facilities planned for Cardiff and London. The Northumberland base will be available for NHS patients from England, Scotland and Wales, medically-insured private patients and self-paying patients.


Councillor Grant Davey, leader of Northumberland County Council, said: “We are delighted Northumberland has been chosen as the first place in England to be able to provide high energy Proton Beam Therapy. This is not only good news for the county – it will provide a great economic boost to the whole region and highlight our commitment as a place to invest for the future.”

Proton Beam Therapy has had a high profile in recent months following the controversial case of five-year-old Ashya King.

The youngster’s parents, Brett and Naghmeh King, sparked an international manhunt after taking their sick son out of hospital in Southampton without doctors’ consent. He later received successful treatment at the Proton Therapy Centre (PTC) in Prague.

Chairman of Earth Balance, Alan Rutherford said: “We are delighted that Proton Partners are coming to the site and we are working hard with local healthcare partners, energy partners, health and wellbeing partners and the local community to ensure that the training and care opportunities are meeting local needs.”

Earlier this year, the Government has announced that it is to create two NHS proton beam therapy units which will open in 2018.

Gordon McVie, chairman of Proton Partners International Ltd, said: “Our goal is to herald a new era of cancer care provision in the UK, bringing the first high energy Proton Beam Therapy centres to the UK and therefore unveiling our site today marks another significant milestone.

“It is estimated that around 10% of patients who receive radiotherapy would be better treated by Proton Beam Therapy. Across the world Proton Beam Therapy has been shown to deliver significant results for patients, especially in lowering side effects. The sooner we can start treating patients in the UK the better.”
The only time you should look back is to see how far you have come
User
Posted 04 Aug 2016 at 14:02

There are also Proton Beam Therapy Centres being built for the NHS at Christies Manchester and UCLH London.

User
Posted 04 Aug 2016 at 14:51

Very interesting development Vivienne and something I had not heard of. So a private venture will likely be operational before the 2 Government sponsored Proton facilities at The Christie Manchester and UCLH London which were at one time expected to be completed by 2014! You are correct in saying that the one near you will be the first high energy facility in the UK but it will not be the first Proton centre in the UK as Proton Partners International state on their web site. This is because Clatterbridge has been treating eye melanomas with low power Proton Beam for some 25 years. This illustrates how slow UK Government's and our health system has been to capitalise on this success and despite Proton Beam facilities having been built in other countries and proved particularly advantageous for some cancers. Even the Government planned facilities will not be able to treat with Carbon ions and other ions so will not be so advanced as some already operational in other countries such as Germany, Japan and Italy to name just three. Typical UK - little and late! The few studies on the theoretical advantage of Proton Beam for treating PCa over conventional methods of radiation using Photons show less certainty. (With the latter, radiation damages everything in it's path including healthy cells. With Proton Beam the dose is preset largely to paint only the cancer target - the narrow so called BRAGG PEAK, so damage to healthy cells should be very minimal.)


http://www.clatterbridgecc.nhs.uk/professionals/physics-department/cyclotron



http://www.proton-int.com/who-we-are


 


This is rather removed from Immunotherapy and I only used this an an example to partly answer why we lag behind with implementation of medical innovation. Nevertheless, it has produced an interesting aside.

Edited by member 04 Aug 2016 at 15:38  | Reason: Not specified

Barry
 
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