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Going back to work

User
Posted 26 Jun 2017 at 06:50
Not sure how many people are like me, but I have PC with secondary bone Mets and have recently completed 8 cycles of Chemotherapy.

Anyway, that aside, I have been off work for 7 months due to the chemo and am now going back to work today, be it on a part time basis.

Looking forward to getting back in to the real world.

Some people think I am mad and should retire, but not me.

Are any others in my situation still working?

Regards

Dave
"Incurable cancer does not mean it is untreatable and does not mean it is terminal either"
User
Posted 26 Jun 2017 at 07:47

Some men on here have worked right through the chemo without any time off - others have taken ill health retirement as soon as they were diagnosed. I guess it depends on a) your financial situation b) how much you enjoy your work and c) what you would do instead.

For men with very late diagnosis it is often sensible to remain in employment to get the death in service benefit, which is usually a much higher amount than any pension provider will pay as a lump sum. But advice from a financial adviser is as important as the oncologist's view.

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard
User
Posted 26 Jun 2017 at 06:50
Not sure how many people are like me, but I have PC with secondary bone Mets and have recently completed 8 cycles of Chemotherapy.

Anyway, that aside, I have been off work for 7 months due to the chemo and am now going back to work today, be it on a part time basis.

Looking forward to getting back in to the real world.

Some people think I am mad and should retire, but not me.

Are any others in my situation still working?

Regards

Dave
"Incurable cancer does not mean it is untreatable and does not mean it is terminal either"
User
Posted 26 Jun 2017 at 07:45

Hi Dave and all the best when you return to work , I'm beginning to think I'm married to superman ! Gary was diagnosed December 2015 PSA 23 Gleason 4/5 with node involvement at the age of 55 ,which was quite a shock as he had no symptons .
Like you he had the chemo but only 6 sessions ,I'm not sure where he got his physical strength from but only took 1 day off during the chemo and that was after the last session ,he even managed to work in the mornings of the chemo treatment .
The only thing that's changed is he's not working Saturdays ,well only on the youngest sons new house !
I hope all goes well for you and I wish Gary would go part time as it's such a worry for me that I'll get a phone call to say that he's over done it or even worse .
Best wishes
Debby

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User
Posted 26 Jun 2017 at 07:45

Hi Dave and all the best when you return to work , I'm beginning to think I'm married to superman ! Gary was diagnosed December 2015 PSA 23 Gleason 4/5 with node involvement at the age of 55 ,which was quite a shock as he had no symptons .
Like you he had the chemo but only 6 sessions ,I'm not sure where he got his physical strength from but only took 1 day off during the chemo and that was after the last session ,he even managed to work in the mornings of the chemo treatment .
The only thing that's changed is he's not working Saturdays ,well only on the youngest sons new house !
I hope all goes well for you and I wish Gary would go part time as it's such a worry for me that I'll get a phone call to say that he's over done it or even worse .
Best wishes
Debby

User
Posted 26 Jun 2017 at 07:47

Some men on here have worked right through the chemo without any time off - others have taken ill health retirement as soon as they were diagnosed. I guess it depends on a) your financial situation b) how much you enjoy your work and c) what you would do instead.

For men with very late diagnosis it is often sensible to remain in employment to get the death in service benefit, which is usually a much higher amount than any pension provider will pay as a lump sum. But advice from a financial adviser is as important as the oncologist's view.

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard
User
Posted 26 Jun 2017 at 09:32
A very insightful response Lyn, couldn't give better advice. John retired straight away due to the impact of zoladex and that fact that his RAF career was coming to an end and who on earth would employ someone with advanced PCA? We don't regret that though he missed his colleagues and the mental stimulation. It's completely random as to how people are affected, probably depends where the mets are too.

Good luck with your return to work.

Devonmaid

Edited by member 26 Jun 2017 at 11:21  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 26 Jun 2017 at 10:17

I want to wish you all the best with your return to work. My husband is about to start Chemo and intends to keep working if he can so very interested in this thread.

User
Posted 26 Jun 2017 at 10:25

Originally Posted by: Online Community Member


I want to wish you all the best with your return to work. My husband is about to start Chemo and intends to keep working if he can so very interested in this thread.



I think you should consider this very carefully particularly during the neutropenic period of each chemo cycle. I bitterly regret developing pneumonia shortly after my ninth infusion.

 
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