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PSA elevation

Posted 16 December 2017 08:51:05(UTC)
In 2010 I had a TURP. The result of this was a diagnosis of prostate cancer. Gleason 3+3 pT1a. Consequently I have had my PSA monitored every 3 months. The TURP was not successful and I also have to self-catheterise on a daily basis. The PSA levels have fluctuated over the last seven years but are usually around the 1.0 to 1.5 levels.
In September this year a regular PSA test came back as 2.0. A month later another test came back 2.4 and at the beginning of December it was 4.0. I saw my consultant yesterday who carried out a DRE which indicated no abnormalities. He suspects a possible infection but also suspects the intermittent self-catheterisation (ISC) is also elevating the PSA. The plan is to put me on a two week course of Ciprofloxacin and then have another PSA test in the new year. I would be interested in any thoughts on the plan?
Also is there any body out there who ISC’s and has noticed this affecting their PSA? If so when should I stop the ISC prior to the PSA test?
Thanks in anticipation.
Posted 16 December 2017 12:46:32(UTC)

Post RARP I was told the ISD and dilatations could be affecting my PSA, but I think it was wishful thinking on the part of my team. My PSA only rose from 0.03 to .27 in two years of ISD. Post RT my PSA dropped from 0.27 to 0.04 and I was still performing ISD up until a few weeks ago.

You presumably still have some of your prostate left whereas mine was removed so not exactly the same situation.

Hope all goes well and you get it sorted.

Thanks Chris
Posted 21 December 2017 13:22:04(UTC)

I assume Wairds that you were tested for infection so that antibiotics could be given?

Every time a catheter is used it has the potential to cause infection, after all it is a foreign body being introduced into yours, so great must be taken, which I am sure you so

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