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Supplements and allergies

User
Posted 14 Oct 2018 at 18:56

In 2013 a routine medical examination showed that I had an antigen score for my prostate that was at a level that required further monitoring.

A member of staff at an NHS hospital informed me that some patients had found that drinking green tea reduced their antigen score.

I avoided drinking green tea because I am allergic to salicylates, chemicals that are found in a variety of food and drinks. If I had begun to drink green tea it would have been advisable for me to give up driving.

I instead experimented with a number of supplements.

I began with Turmeric, which was recommended by a colleague with an Islamic Indian heritage. My antigen score was reduced.

I then added a number of other supplements to my diet – pomegranate juice,

pumpkin seed, tablets containing cruciferous vegetables ie cabbage and similar green vegetables, plus Lycopene tablets.  Lycopene is basically the chemical that adds to the bright colouring to some fruits and vegetables, which are by co-incidence, limited in my diet through my reaction to salicylates.

After a period of five years I was informed by a medical professional that my antigen score was stable and that a longer period between consultations would now be appropriate.

I contacted Prostate Cancer UK to discuss the use of supplements. This resulted in the email which is enclosed, that basically states that the supplements that I been taking,- minus green tea but with the addition of pumpkin seed and Lypocene had been used in an experiment in the USA. Positive results were obtained for 63% of the participants in reducing their antigen score.

The charity also explained that they could not recommend these supplements because the evidence of their benefits was not sufficiently established scientifically.

 I however believe that many men who face a shortened life span would find the above information as beneficial.

User
Posted 15 Oct 2018 at 17:47
Huw Mor, you have made an unsustainable leap in your argument. It is one thing to use supplements to reduce a PSA reading (which may be elevated for a number of reasons). It is quite another thing though to assert that men with PCa who may or may not be facing a shortened life span will benefit from this regime. It is unproven.

AC

User
Posted 01 May 2019 at 13:10
At Xmas of this year I suffered a bout of Norovirus. A blood test through my local surgery showed that my PSA score had doubled since the summer. However, within two months it had returned to it's previous score. My GP stated that there is a lot that we do not know about the prostate. I believe that in these circumstances it is reasonable to state that regular moderate intakes of dietary supplements where there is some evidence of beneficial effects without adverse reaction, cannot be dismissed.
User
Posted 01 May 2019 at 16:01

Originally Posted by: Online Community Member
I believe that in these circumstances it is reasonable to state that regular moderate intakes of dietary supplements where there is some evidence of beneficial effects without adverse reaction, cannot be dismissed.

But there is no evidence of beneficial effects.

It's just as likely some of these will induce or speed up PCa and other illnesses. Many of them are known to be dangerous in specific circumstances.

User
Posted 02 May 2019 at 09:15
Reducing 'antigen score' may make you feel better, and that's nice. But what matters is its effect - or lack of - on cancer.

And there is zero evidence to support that. Absolute zero.

Far from dismissing your unsupported claims, I'd urge you to put whatever pressure you can on the snake oil salesmen to have their dubious products tested to see if there is any (real) benefit, and prove that there is no harm. Because while you advertise them for free, they make a hefty profit on every sale.

.

-- Andrew --

"I intend to live forever, or die trying" - Groucho Marx

 
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