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Early retirement

User
Posted 09 Jun 2019 at 15:10
After careful consideration, I'm retiring on 1st August this year, at which time I'll be 57. Being diagnosed with two different types of cancer and everything I've been through, treatment-wise, in the last year, has made me realise that there are far more important things in life than work. I've worked out all the finances and I can easily afford to retire with very little (if any) change in my standard of living, so I may as well do it.

Hopefully the cancer is all sorted out, but if either does recur at some point in the future, I want to enjoy whatever time I have, whether that's 5 years or 40 years! All the paperwork for my various pensions in now submitted, so just a matter of waiting for 1st August to come along. I can't wait - I have all sorts of plans.

Best wishes,

Chris

User
Posted 09 Jun 2019 at 18:36

Just picked this up. I had a mental health doctor complete a form, also had forms from my GP, oncologist and rheumatologist plus a report funded by my council employer from occupational health.

 

Ido4

User
Posted 09 Jun 2019 at 22:04
I was advised by our HR dept to see our OH doctor as I have a recurrence. Much as I expected they have said I am not eligible for retirement due to my illness.

Bri

User
Posted 09 Jun 2019 at 22:34

Although I retired on medical grounds I was deemed fit enough to do jobs other than teaching! As a result I didn’t get any enhancement on my pension.

Ido4

User
Posted 10 Jun 2019 at 07:00
With my employer if you are fit to do any other job anywhere you are not eligible. Very high threshold

Bri

User
Posted 10 Jun 2019 at 15:04

And that is the issue - even if I do have a recurrence, the fact that my cancer will then be incurable does not necessarily mean that I am incapable of doing any job in the organisation, if it has one available which meets my skill set.  I think it will only be once I become a burden to the organisation that the pension scheme really kicks in.  It isn't the fact that one has incurable cancer that is the criteria for early medical retirement - it is how that cancer impacts upon your ability to do the job.  And, of course, there are death in service benefits to consider too.  My death in service is three times my annual salary, so as a headteacher, that is a considerable sum.  I need to know how quickly I'm likely to die if I have a recurrence as I wouldn't want my kids to lose out on that.

It's funny how our protective systems almost make want to be ill so that we unlock big sums of money.

And no one should proceed without sound independent financial advice.

Ulsterman

Edited by member 10 Jun 2019 at 15:11  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 10 Jun 2019 at 15:58
My friend with PCa has a stock of Nembutal (Pentobarbital) from a Peruvian Veterinary Surgery, if you want your estate to claim your death in service benefits early😉

He is a member of Exit, the Voluntary Euthanasia Society, or whatever it’s called these days, goes to all their meetings, and is perfectly fit, running five K a day, except for...

As I live next door to a vet, he’s implored me to ‘chat her up, and get some Nembutal for yourself’.

If I ever get to that point, I would rather ‘fall’ off my balcony on a cruise ship, preferably near to one of the poles, rather than the Caribbean where the sea is around 28° C.

Cheers, John.

User
Posted 10 Jun 2019 at 16:31

Hi Bri, the threshold was pretty high, but the reports focused on my ability to sustain 55-60 hour weeks, be on my feet a lot, and deal with fatigue plus toilet issues. Plus the stress of dealing with exam entries, staff issues, pupil discipline, 14 hour days when a patents consultation was happening after school etc.

You can’t just leave a class of teenagers when you need to go to the loo otherwise trouble erupts? Especially as I was teaching Physics so pupils would be doing experiments which adds another layer and of potential health and safety issues.

I was also suffering from anxiety and depression which was taken into account.

My body wasn’t coping and unlikely to recover to a point where it could cope.

I was also suffering visual migraines which intensified with stress and fatigue.

That was what decided it.

After surgery alone I wouldn’t have qualified. I’m sorry to read your employer is setting even higher thresholds.

All the best.

 

 

Ido4

User
Posted 10 Jun 2019 at 17:17

Cheers. I am a qualified professional managing other qualified staff and I am at the top salary scale for my post. I manage lots of very complex work including protecting vulnerable people.  But if I am able to sit in a chair pushing a button somewhere then I’m not eligible. 

Bri 

User
Posted 10 Jun 2019 at 17:58

That’s a tough one Bri. Hope you didn’t mind my more detailed response.

 

Ido4

User
Posted 10 Jun 2019 at 19:56
Interesting post ! Please don’t anyone be offended. I was retired at 46 from a high pressure position only to find at 48 I had prostate cancer and had surgery. At the age of 50 I was so damn bored I’ve had 3 jobs in the last 2 yrs. A whole year as a Healthcare assistant in a nursing home , 3 months washing up , and nearly a year as a school caretaker which is my dream job , and I’ve never felt such appreciation in all my 30+ yrs work. I know it’s all gonna go Pete Tong sooner or later , but my rollercoaster has led me to all sorts of new directions. All take care.

If life gives you lemons , then make lemonade

User
Posted 10 Jun 2019 at 21:01

Originally Posted by: Online Community Member

That’s a tough one Bri. Hope you didn’t mind my more detailed response.

 

 

no not at all 😉

User
Posted 10 Jun 2019 at 21:36

Bri 

how is your decision making and clarity of thought?  I’m on bicalutimide at the moment and several have commented that it can lead to fuzziness of mind.  I find it hard to concentrate, remember things and organise myself.  Hopefully, once I finish bicalutimide in August I’ll be in a better place.  If I have to restart HT, based on my experience of bicalutimide, I wouldn’t be able to do my job.

ulsterman

User
Posted 10 Jun 2019 at 22:38
How long have you been on it, ulsterman? I had the symptoms you describe (I’ve been on 150mg/day bicalutimide since last August) but fortunately in my case they wore off after a few months.

Best wishes,

Chris

User
Posted 10 Jun 2019 at 22:42

16 months, Chris.  2 more to go.  My weight is rising, body hair has all but gone and I only need to shave once a week.  It’s as if all the side effects are gaining more and more ground the longer I’m on it.  Tiredness, lack of focus,  lack of decision making are all getting worse.  Tempted to stop, but I won’t.

User
Posted 11 Jun 2019 at 07:37
Sorry to hear that - HT drugs do seem to affect individuals very differently. I know I've got off lightly in terms of side-effects. I've gained quite a lot of weight (working on that now!) and of course had the expected total loss of libido, but that's pretty much it. The first couple of months I felt as though my head was full of cotton wool, but thankfully that wore off.

I hope that things improve for you once you stop taking the bicalutamide.

Best wishes,

Chris

User
Posted 09 Feb 2020 at 11:46

I’ve come to realise that most people (or so it seems to me) don’t get to plan and choose their retirement date. They either retire through I’ll health or it’s pushed on them via redundancy. I had a lot of time off with my cancer treatment and I guess my employer of 18 years just got fed up with it and made me redundant.

it has taken me a couple of years to come to terms with this and I’m now starting to emotionally accept retirement. I know that money plays a big part in the decision but having gone through cancer treatment I also know that there are things far more important. My advice to you is to find a way to pack in work and use your precious time doing the things you have a passion for. All the best to you.

User
Posted 09 Feb 2020 at 15:45
In my own case, Jim, my cancer diagnosis made me realise that there were far more important things in life than work, so I took early retirement last August. Fortunately I was in a position where I could afford to do so.

Best wishes,

Chris

User
Posted 18 Jul 2020 at 10:16

Just looking at this feed with views that my husband should retire if possible so he can enjoy a more relaxed pace of life....He is 52 with 34 years service under LGPS as a heavy diesel Motor Technician at our local Airport. He could potentially go on redundancy due to the current covid-19 situation with the Airport requiring to downsize its employees.

We haven't asked for figures yet but wonder which route he should look at first 🤔   He is likely to be in HT for life according to the doctor at his diagnosis appointment. 

I work full-time with a healthy salary so could potentially support our lifestyle...any advice would be appreciated as I'm out of my depth as not sure he he will qualify for ill health retirement.

User
Posted 18 Jul 2020 at 10:42

I'm 56, sometimes I think retirement would be lovely. I have a few hobbies, I wouldn't have a lot of money, but maybe enough.

BUT I think it would be a bad idea.

I am lucky I work for myself, even with covid and hardly any work to do i still go in the office I do all the things at work I've been meaning to do. I talk to my colleagues.

If I retired I probably could cope, but plenty of people just can't cope with being at home alone. Once you OH retires I think getting back into work at his age and with his diagnosis may be hard (anti discrimination laws don't work). Now he could start a new business or do voluntary work, and he may have loads of hobbies, or enjoy the garden, so it may be a good idea, but think carefully what will he do with his time?

Edited by member 18 Jul 2020 at 12:54  | Reason: Added a year to my age I forgot I had a birthday this week.

Dave

 
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