I'm interested in conversations about and I want to talk about
Know exactly what you want?
Show search

Notification

Error

DVT post surgery

User
Posted 06 Feb 2019 at 20:22

My husband had an RP on 3 January and all seemed to be well post-surgery allowing for normal associated aches and pains.  Incontinence wise, he’s on 3/4 pads a day but is working hard doing his exercises and knows to be patient.  

Last weekend, he woke to find his right leg had swollen top to bottom; it was also red and aching.  He has been on daily anti-coagulant injections since the operation.  An ultrasound scan earlier this week has revealed a DVT at the top of his inner thigh and he’s been prescribed higher dose anti-coag injections on a daily basis for six months. I’ve read that men are more at risk especially after radiotherapy but can’t seem to find any other info on post surgery DVTs.  

We have yet to have histology results planned for end February, obviously hoping for no further treatment but would be RT if necessary.  He’s 67 in excellent health, fit with slender build.  On diagnosis after MPMRI/TRUS biopsy in August 2018 he was suspected T3a/b Gleason 6 PSA 10.8.   The surgeon did remove lymph nodes and nerves were not spared.  Does anyone have any experience of DVT post-surgery and dealing with it.  I know we were warned of surgery risks but it’s still been a bit of a shock tbh.  Thanks for reading.

User
Posted 07 Feb 2019 at 03:11
Don’t know anything about DVT except that is a risk factor after any surgery involving general anaesthetic - and after any long-haul flight. Hence the compression stockings and anti-coagulant injections. Sorry they didn’t work in his case.

There is also a 3% risk of lymphoedema at some point in the future if lymph nodes have been removed.

Interestingly, I had a blood test this week and I asked if there was an anti-coagulant in the bottom of the test tube. I was told some tubes have anti-coagulant agents in, and others contain coagulants, depending what they are testing for.

Best of luck with the injections and for positive news from the pathology department.

Cheers, John.

User
Posted 07 Feb 2019 at 09:41

As Bollinge said, DVT is a risk attached to any surgery; it's about lying in the same position for a long time. They usually give anti-coag injections pre-op to reduce the risk, as well as post op. It's a different issue with radiotherapy, which can cause damage to blood vessels that get in the way!

Recovery, these days, is usually uneventful, though - even without lymphedema - he may end up with one leg slightly larger than the other, and he's likely to be on long-term anti-coag, even after the high-dose treatments.

.

-- Andrew --

"I intend to live forever, or die trying" - Groucho Marx

Show Most Thanked Posts
User
Posted 07 Feb 2019 at 03:11
Don’t know anything about DVT except that is a risk factor after any surgery involving general anaesthetic - and after any long-haul flight. Hence the compression stockings and anti-coagulant injections. Sorry they didn’t work in his case.

There is also a 3% risk of lymphoedema at some point in the future if lymph nodes have been removed.

Interestingly, I had a blood test this week and I asked if there was an anti-coagulant in the bottom of the test tube. I was told some tubes have anti-coagulant agents in, and others contain coagulants, depending what they are testing for.

Best of luck with the injections and for positive news from the pathology department.

Cheers, John.

User
Posted 07 Feb 2019 at 09:41

As Bollinge said, DVT is a risk attached to any surgery; it's about lying in the same position for a long time. They usually give anti-coag injections pre-op to reduce the risk, as well as post op. It's a different issue with radiotherapy, which can cause damage to blood vessels that get in the way!

Recovery, these days, is usually uneventful, though - even without lymphedema - he may end up with one leg slightly larger than the other, and he's likely to be on long-term anti-coag, even after the high-dose treatments.

.

-- Andrew --

"I intend to live forever, or die trying" - Groucho Marx

 
Forum Jump  
©2019 Prostate Cancer UK