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More tests tomorrow then we will really know ?

User
Posted 29 Jan 2015 at 07:54
tomorrow my husband has a bone scan and CT. We are hoping the Cancer is contained. We may have been lucky because his pca was picked up during a routine colonoscopy. His psa would not have raised concern at 2.4 and aged 73.. Today I was discouraged when I heard from a woman at work that a radical open prostatectomy is a very delicate operation. She had the story of her brother who had the operation and nearly died because the surgeon perforated his bowel. How common would this occur I am wondering. Along with the risk of blood clots I am having some second thoughts re surgery...
User
Posted 29 Jan 2015 at 15:12

Please dont be put off by this . Could you consider robotic or laporoscopic prostatectomy? Ask the nurses on this site. EL

User
Posted 29 Jan 2015 at 15:40

My other half has just been treated by brachytherapy but is only in his 50's but we were told that prostate removal is only done for men under 70. It may just be our hospital, but there are other treatments to consider.

User
Posted 29 Jan 2015 at 19:42


The same would apply for any other major operation ie the health of the patient and understanding there are risks with any surgery.

However, for a number of reasons it is important to check that your surgeon is experienced in his/her chosen method of prostate removal

Hope all goes well tomorrow

Bri

Edited by member 29 Jan 2015 at 19:50  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 29 Jan 2015 at 21:32

I had keyhole surgery and I was warned by my surgeon that there was a remote possibility of him "nicking" (my word) part of my gut when he went through all the risks of the surgery; but this must be a rare occurrence or we would hear about it on this site. My surgeon told me that he would repair the problem and he might give me a temporary colostomy while it healed. It did not happen.

The possibility isn't surprising when you consider how deep in the tummy he was working, and that the prostate is right next to the rectum

A quick search revealed this paper
Eur Urol. 1996;29(3):337-40.
Rectal perforation after retropubic radical prostatectomy: occurrence and management.
Häggman M1, Brändstedt S, Norlen BJ.
where 10 cases out of 270 were reported (3.6% of those cases)

Management of thrombosis is very good these days, they make you wear compression stockings (I used mine for 2 weeks), my lower legs were encased in a massaging cuffs for 24hrs after the op and I had to inject Heparin an anti-coagulant for 30 days after the op (a very good reason to take things easy after the op by the way).

Hope this is useful info
good luck
Andy

Edited by member 29 Jan 2015 at 21:41  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 29 Jan 2015 at 21:41

As stated above, the chances of that particular complication are very rare indeed.

Once he has had all the checks and tests then you can start to decide what treatment option is best for you both.

Don't discount anything at this stage.

atb

Dave

User
Posted 30 Jan 2015 at 00:15

Hi,
at 73 he might be more concerned about the risk of incontinence and impotence than perforated bowel. Once you know all the results, it would be worth discussing whether active surveillance, radiotherapy and brachytherapy are options.

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

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User
Posted 29 Jan 2015 at 15:12

Please dont be put off by this . Could you consider robotic or laporoscopic prostatectomy? Ask the nurses on this site. EL

User
Posted 29 Jan 2015 at 15:40

My other half has just been treated by brachytherapy but is only in his 50's but we were told that prostate removal is only done for men under 70. It may just be our hospital, but there are other treatments to consider.

User
Posted 29 Jan 2015 at 19:42


The same would apply for any other major operation ie the health of the patient and understanding there are risks with any surgery.

However, for a number of reasons it is important to check that your surgeon is experienced in his/her chosen method of prostate removal

Hope all goes well tomorrow

Bri

Edited by member 29 Jan 2015 at 19:50  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 29 Jan 2015 at 21:32

I had keyhole surgery and I was warned by my surgeon that there was a remote possibility of him "nicking" (my word) part of my gut when he went through all the risks of the surgery; but this must be a rare occurrence or we would hear about it on this site. My surgeon told me that he would repair the problem and he might give me a temporary colostomy while it healed. It did not happen.

The possibility isn't surprising when you consider how deep in the tummy he was working, and that the prostate is right next to the rectum

A quick search revealed this paper
Eur Urol. 1996;29(3):337-40.
Rectal perforation after retropubic radical prostatectomy: occurrence and management.
Häggman M1, Brändstedt S, Norlen BJ.
where 10 cases out of 270 were reported (3.6% of those cases)

Management of thrombosis is very good these days, they make you wear compression stockings (I used mine for 2 weeks), my lower legs were encased in a massaging cuffs for 24hrs after the op and I had to inject Heparin an anti-coagulant for 30 days after the op (a very good reason to take things easy after the op by the way).

Hope this is useful info
good luck
Andy

Edited by member 29 Jan 2015 at 21:41  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 29 Jan 2015 at 21:41

As stated above, the chances of that particular complication are very rare indeed.

Once he has had all the checks and tests then you can start to decide what treatment option is best for you both.

Don't discount anything at this stage.

atb

Dave

User
Posted 30 Jan 2015 at 00:15

Hi,
at 73 he might be more concerned about the risk of incontinence and impotence than perforated bowel. Once you know all the results, it would be worth discussing whether active surveillance, radiotherapy and brachytherapy are options.

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

 
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