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Surgery recovery time

User
Posted 02 Jun 2015 at 13:11

I have been diagnosed with localised prostate cancer with a Gleason score of 3+4 on one side and 3+3 on the other with the recommendation of surgery being the preferred option for treatment. The rationale being that should surgery not be 100% successful then radiotherapy would be possible as opposed to Radoitherapy first preventing a surgical remaoval of the gland should the cancer reappear. I can understand that thinking and have resigned myself to going down the surgical route. RD&E in Exeter has the Da Vinci robot so I would hope that is the option that will be offered to me and would be grateful for some feedback from others who have been down this avenue as to how long I will be out of action for and the time it takes to recover to a reasonably active life. I am aware of the incontinence issues and how that varies from person to person but its more how long before I can expect to have to spend on "light duties" for and the experience of others.

User
Posted 11 Jul 2015 at 06:58
Hi Dick,

As you know Stuart is now 2 days post op and will be coming home today, he was surprisingly good yesterday obviously uncomfortable but in good spirits. I am guessing it will be a but different when we are home as he won't have the safety of hospital and Nurses on tap! For preparation just make sure you buy some jogging bottoms to wear when you are home with the catheter bag which is strapped to your leg. I was also advised to buy pants 1 size bigger as your stomach will be swollen for a few days because of the gas they use to expand you to do the op. Also buy some Tena for Men level 2 pads, I bought 120 on Amazon for 40 pounds which is a bit cheaper than buying individual packs in Sainsbury. We also bough pyjamas with shorts which he was wearing yesterday in hospital they were a good buy. I can't think of anything else but I'm sure the others that are s bit further down the road will have some tips too.

Trish

User
Posted 02 Jun 2015 at 14:16

Hi Dick B,

I had daVinci surgery last June 2014 ( you can check out my profile and the profile of others by clicking on usernames )

I had no complications and so I was discharged from hospital within 24 hours. You may be kept in longer if you have a drain or temperature etc.

You will leave hospital with a catheter fitted and this will remain in place for up to 2 weeks depending on individual surgeons preference. 

Although the op wounds are quite small it's a major operation and you will feel a little delicate for the first few days / weeks.

Once your catheter has been removed you will be more mobile and can start to slowly increase your exercise levels.


Depending on your job, I would allow yourself at least  6 weeks before you consider 'normal ' work again. I was fortunate to be retired so never had that factor to consider.

Recovery rates for individuals vary, so listen to your body and try to be patient and not  overdo things too early or you may end up going backwards..
Many on here have had a RP and will be able to explain things far better than me ( I'm no good with words! http://community.prostatecanceruk.org/editors/tiny_mce/plugins/emoticons/img/smiley-smile.gif )

Good luck with the op if that's the path you choose to take.

Best Wishes
Luther

User
Posted 25 Jun 2015 at 14:57

Hi Dick
I am still in hospital 10 days after op but have had serious UNRELATED issues ok. I think to come home after 1 nite would be a rush , but after 2 nites would be fine. I had my catheter out in hospital today which was painless and am wearing pads. I feel fit enough to walk , sit , bend , stairs etc. I wouldn't lift. I'd be wary driving as the a anaesthetic is obvs still in me. Good luck. You can follow my progress on my own post when I get home
Good luck Trish xx

Edited by member 25 Jun 2015 at 14:58  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 26 Jun 2015 at 22:50

I had my prostate removed by Da Vinci in April 2015. I was also 70yrs in April as well. From January I trained fairly hard, running off road, 3 - 5 miles a day working on the principle that if I was fit(ish) the op would be easier to take on. No idea if this made any difference but it kept my mind occupied. I was in hospital for three days, no real problems except I had to sleep on the most uncomforable mattress in the world!!!

My catheter was in for 14 days which seemed a lifetime! On the fifth day after discharge I decided to start a daily three mile daily hike in my favourite wood. A five mile drive to the wood with a catheter in wasn't much fun but I soon learned how to manage it.

When the catheter came out the nurse gave me a load of free samples, including some pads. That night I wore one and then wet the bed, my one and only time. I really hated those pads!

At first I had to wear a urine bag but I noticed day by day on each walk I was improving. I soon gave up the bags and tried the pads again. When they ran out (I hated them but did not want to waste them) I improvised and made myself some 'penis cradles' from some cheap incontinence sheets. I just cut little oblongs of 3" x 2", folded them longways and sellotaped one end and carried a few of these in my pocket. After I wee'd I just placed my penis in one of these and they were held in place by my underwear. They worked a treat!

I was improving all the time and soon, except for odd occasions, stopped using them. I decided to stop being a patient on 1st June and to resume normal life. On June 2nd I caught the train to Chepstow and walked and camped along Offas Dyke Path for 108 miles (7 days) just to prove to myself I was OK. I was fine except for one small problem. On steeper downhill sections I found that the jarring and the quick movements to steady myself had the effect of making me drip small amount of urine into my underwear. A real irritation!

I quickly bought some new underwear in Monmouth and threw the soiled one in a bin and bought some cheap ladies sanitary towels as well. I cut each pad into three and used one on an as and when I needed basis. This solved my problem until I returned home.

I have since realised that this problem has stayed with me and is the last difficulty for me to overcome. I do not know if I will ever become 100% continent again so I still use my little cradles to keep it well under control. Like today for example, I was in control and peeing normally until at about 13.30hrs, then in an unguarded moment I sneezed and bingo, a small amount of urine passed through. I then had to quickly find a toilet to wee properly.

Luckingly I was only two miles from home so was quickly able to nip home, have a shower and change. This little incident reminds me that I always have to be ready for the odd 'accident' so will start from tomorrow to keep a few of my 'cradles' in my pocket each time I go out.

User
Posted 11 Jul 2015 at 11:06

A bucket


Might not need to buy any Tena pads - with a bit of luck, Trish will be giving you Stuart's stock. 120 Trish??? I bought a pack of thirty and ended up throwing most of them away!

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

User
Posted 11 Jul 2015 at 11:40

Most of my level 2 pads ( 160 ) came from a very nice man on this site , and I will probably pass them on soon . He got them for free in his NHS area

User
Posted 11 Jul 2015 at 12:08

Lets just hope you are one of the really lucky ones x

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User
Posted 02 Jun 2015 at 13:39

Hello Dick.B. Just to say welcome really.
I expect somebody will be along soon to point you in the right direction.
I don't know much about the surgery, only what I've read on here but there are many members who have taken that road and their experience will be helpful to you in general terms.

As you know you are going down the surgery route you could perhaps download relevant information from the publications section of this site.
If you go to page 10 on the publications page you will see something called a Surgery Support Pack.
This contains a few samples of pads, wet wipes and disposable bags. You can obtain a pack by speaking to a Specialist Nurse on the confidential helpline.

Best Wishes
Sandra

We can't control the winds - but we can adjust our sails
User
Posted 02 Jun 2015 at 14:16

Hi Dick B,

I had daVinci surgery last June 2014 ( you can check out my profile and the profile of others by clicking on usernames )

I had no complications and so I was discharged from hospital within 24 hours. You may be kept in longer if you have a drain or temperature etc.

You will leave hospital with a catheter fitted and this will remain in place for up to 2 weeks depending on individual surgeons preference. 

Although the op wounds are quite small it's a major operation and you will feel a little delicate for the first few days / weeks.

Once your catheter has been removed you will be more mobile and can start to slowly increase your exercise levels.


Depending on your job, I would allow yourself at least  6 weeks before you consider 'normal ' work again. I was fortunate to be retired so never had that factor to consider.

Recovery rates for individuals vary, so listen to your body and try to be patient and not  overdo things too early or you may end up going backwards..
Many on here have had a RP and will be able to explain things far better than me ( I'm no good with words! http://community.prostatecanceruk.org/editors/tiny_mce/plugins/emoticons/img/smiley-smile.gif )

Good luck with the op if that's the path you choose to take.

Best Wishes
Luther

User
Posted 02 Jun 2015 at 16:26

Luther summed it up nicely. In my case, I was in hospital for three days because I had low blood pressure and had to stay in ICU for a bit longer than expected. Catheter was out a week later. I had a fair amount of pereneal pain at first, but it was controlled nicely with pain killers. I went back to work eight weeks later, but luckily was able to work from home (I was an IT consultant) for the next month or so.

The crucial thing is to take life steadily at first (I used the time to catch up on back numbers of StarTrek). The trouble with these laparascopic and robotic operations is that they mask the severity of what has been done. You must not overdo things. Ignore those who tell you that they were running marathons, chopping down trees etc. in week 2. My consultant's words were wise - listen to your body, it will tell you if you are doing too much.

Tony

TURP then LRP in 2009/2010. Lots of leakage but PSA < 0.1 AMS-800 Artificial Sphincter activated 2015.

User
Posted 02 Jun 2015 at 18:04
Hi Dick,

Your story is very similar to mine. Please seee my profile. I had laperascopic surgery 9 weeks ago. I am able to virtually do all the things I used to before surgery except risking lifting anything too heavy.

Paul

THE CHILD HAS GROWN, THE DREAM HAS GONE
User
Posted 02 Jun 2015 at 18:46

Best of luck Dick with your op. Me too on 15th June !! The advice on here is wonderful. Thankyou guys for answering my questions also.

User
Posted 02 Jun 2015 at 20:20

D

 

There are no guarantees with any surgical procedures, I consider myself very fortunate. I was almost dry 4 days post catheter removal, back at work four weeks after Da vinci. Listen to your body and listen to your team. See my profile for more details. Best of luck to you and C.

Thanks Chris

User
Posted 04 Jun 2015 at 10:26

Hi Dick B

I'm on a similar journey to you. I haven't yet had the operation so I'm afraid can't help with the experience and it's after - effects at this stage. I  also opted for DaVinci  which I'm hoping will take place in September - something I requested - so it's possible you'll be there before me. You've already been given some helpful info from others on this site, as indeed I have - have a look at the posts I've received. 

Meanwhile I'll keep an eye on how things are going for you and wish you the very best of luck.

Cobbles

User
Posted 20 Jun 2015 at 23:54
Hi dick

My OH had da Vinci rrp on 1st dec last year.

Seven months on, he is struggling with incontinence. He is dry at night, and dry most mornings, but towards the end of the day, he leaks and is on 2-3 pads a day.

He has just gained some EF back within the last couple of weeks, but it's going to be a long distance race not a sprint.

However, he's ALIVE, and prognosis is good

Hope it goes well for you

Louise

User
Posted 21 Jun 2015 at 10:45
Hi dick I might be just the man as had op 15th. I think everyone is different. I will have been in a week tomorrow but ONLY because a lapro hole is infected quite badly , and my white cell count keeps dropping. Otherwise no pain at all in the prostate area nor the catheter area. They might remove that today as I have really worked my pelvic floor muscles and can squeeze quite well. I genuinely believe I cud walk the dogs for 45 mins , and do most daily light chores. I wouldn't dare risk lifting anything though. You can follow me on Chris j journey , and also cobbles. Very best wishes to you

Chris

User
Posted 21 Jun 2015 at 11:12
Chris,

Just be careful not to rush back to doing things too strenuous, you can get caught out judging by others' experiences.

Steve

User
Posted 21 Jun 2015 at 15:45

From my experience Id have to say that everyones cancer is different ,some more serious some less, alot of it wont be detected until the surgery guys get it there up close and personal, hence no two people will have the same recovery time, its a very individual thing,

I had my surgery last May, its taken longer to recovery than I thought, its been a long hard road with many bumps along the way, but I'm 80-90% there, the quickest part was having the surgery,

in on one morning and out the next day...too quick really should have stayed longer looking back, felt like I'd been on a mass production line , but thats how the the NHS is, I even met the consultant who invented the da Vinci method !

good luck with the surgery and dont try and rush your recovery, it will take as long as it takes IMO

 

User
Posted 22 Jun 2015 at 23:00

Originally Posted by: Online Community Member

I have been diagnosed with localised prostate cancer with a Gleason score of 3+4 on one side and 3+3 on the other with the recommendation of surgery being the preferred option for treatment. The rationale being that should surgery not be 100% successful then radiotherapy would be possible as opposed to Radoitherapy first preventing a surgical remaoval of the gland should the cancer reappear. I can understand that thinking and have resigned myself to going down the surgical route. RD&E in Exeter has the Da Vinci robot so I would hope that is the option that will be offered to me and would be grateful for some feedback from others who have been down this avenue as to how long I will be out of action for and the time it takes to recover to a reasonably active life. I am aware of the incontinence issues and how that varies from person to person but its more how long before I can expect to have to spend on "light duties" for and the experience of others.

Hi Dick

Don't want to put a spanner in the works and Da Vinci may well be the best option for you. However there are other options and in my view the best option is the one that you are happy with after you have considered all the options.

Like you I was advised that Da Vinci was the best option for me because of my 'youthful' age (58 when diagnosed) and because radiotherapy was an option if the cancer returned. However it was clearly suggested that a prostatectomy after radiation treatment was not possible - which is not the case!

I decided against Da Vinci after considering all the options and opted as LD brachytherapy as the most suitable for me. RD&E do not do LD brachy as an option although Plymouth do.

All I saying here is .... consider all the options and not only the recommendation from your consultant. Make sure you discuss options with an Oncologist (not just a surgeon), consider the stats re. side effects, look at the experiences of folk on this site and decide which is the best option for you. Then stick by your choice.

dl

User
Posted 25 Jun 2015 at 10:55

Todays the day! Meeting the surgeon today to discuss the best way forward but my thoughts are on surgery hopefully by Da Vinci. Get the little B****R out and move on hopefully returning to "normal" ASAP. I will keep you posted.

Dick

User
Posted 25 Jun 2015 at 13:26

Good Luck Dick,

 

My husband will be having Da Vinci on 9th of July so I will keep you updated on his progress.

 

Trish

User
Posted 25 Jun 2015 at 14:57

Hi Dick
I am still in hospital 10 days after op but have had serious UNRELATED issues ok. I think to come home after 1 nite would be a rush , but after 2 nites would be fine. I had my catheter out in hospital today which was painless and am wearing pads. I feel fit enough to walk , sit , bend , stairs etc. I wouldn't lift. I'd be wary driving as the a anaesthetic is obvs still in me. Good luck. You can follow my progress on my own post when I get home
Good luck Trish xx

Edited by member 25 Jun 2015 at 14:58  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 25 Jun 2015 at 19:28
Thanks Chris I hope you get home soon x
User
Posted 26 Jun 2015 at 09:47

Having met the consultant yesterday I feel far more comfortable. All my questions were answered before I even had to ask them and I was very reassured to learn that had I lived a little nearer to RD&E it would have been done as a day care treatment without even an overnight stay. Plus the catherter should only be in for a week. The only downside was that it is likely to be August before the op and I suspect that may well be the latter part of the month but at least I have a rough time frame to work to now. Been trying the pelvic floor excercises with a little difficulty so far. I cant seem to get the right muscles to move but practice makes perfect.

User
Posted 26 Jun 2015 at 10:15

Having read about the procedure using the Da Vinci Robot I searched a little more online and found the following video which shows the robot being used to stitch a grape together inside a bottle. It does instill confidence in me at least, I doubt I could even tie stitches let alone with such accuracy.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0XdC1HUp-rU

User
Posted 26 Jun 2015 at 13:02

D

I imagine you have been given instructions how to do the PFEs, I was told to do the same action as if you were trying not to break wind. My incontinence nurse said she could check if I was doing the exercises right, but it would involve a probe.

If you feel a bit braver have a look at some of the Da Vinci Ops on you tube.

I am 14 months on from my Da Vinci Op and despite a couple of minor issues life is almost back to normal. 

All the best for the future.

Thanks Chris

 

 

User
Posted 26 Jun 2015 at 22:50

I had my prostate removed by Da Vinci in April 2015. I was also 70yrs in April as well. From January I trained fairly hard, running off road, 3 - 5 miles a day working on the principle that if I was fit(ish) the op would be easier to take on. No idea if this made any difference but it kept my mind occupied. I was in hospital for three days, no real problems except I had to sleep on the most uncomforable mattress in the world!!!

My catheter was in for 14 days which seemed a lifetime! On the fifth day after discharge I decided to start a daily three mile daily hike in my favourite wood. A five mile drive to the wood with a catheter in wasn't much fun but I soon learned how to manage it.

When the catheter came out the nurse gave me a load of free samples, including some pads. That night I wore one and then wet the bed, my one and only time. I really hated those pads!

At first I had to wear a urine bag but I noticed day by day on each walk I was improving. I soon gave up the bags and tried the pads again. When they ran out (I hated them but did not want to waste them) I improvised and made myself some 'penis cradles' from some cheap incontinence sheets. I just cut little oblongs of 3" x 2", folded them longways and sellotaped one end and carried a few of these in my pocket. After I wee'd I just placed my penis in one of these and they were held in place by my underwear. They worked a treat!

I was improving all the time and soon, except for odd occasions, stopped using them. I decided to stop being a patient on 1st June and to resume normal life. On June 2nd I caught the train to Chepstow and walked and camped along Offas Dyke Path for 108 miles (7 days) just to prove to myself I was OK. I was fine except for one small problem. On steeper downhill sections I found that the jarring and the quick movements to steady myself had the effect of making me drip small amount of urine into my underwear. A real irritation!

I quickly bought some new underwear in Monmouth and threw the soiled one in a bin and bought some cheap ladies sanitary towels as well. I cut each pad into three and used one on an as and when I needed basis. This solved my problem until I returned home.

I have since realised that this problem has stayed with me and is the last difficulty for me to overcome. I do not know if I will ever become 100% continent again so I still use my little cradles to keep it well under control. Like today for example, I was in control and peeing normally until at about 13.30hrs, then in an unguarded moment I sneezed and bingo, a small amount of urine passed through. I then had to quickly find a toilet to wee properly.

Luckingly I was only two miles from home so was quickly able to nip home, have a shower and change. This little incident reminds me that I always have to be ready for the odd 'accident' so will start from tomorrow to keep a few of my 'cradles' in my pocket each time I go out.

User
Posted 27 Jun 2015 at 01:56

Naughty boy Gunwharfman, your exploits are interesting to read but you are a very bad role model. Most car insurance companies would not cover you to drive so soon after surgery so I hope you gave them a call to check? And I don't think there would be many surgeons that would be okay with their patient taking a 3 mile hike after 5 days :-(

Dick, for mere mortals, this operation is major surgery .... despite the tiny external wounds there is some major stitching on the inside and it is really important to rest properly and not rush things if you want to reduce the risk of permanent side effects. Not just recovery of bladder control but also in the hope of avoiding a hernia later on.

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

User
Posted 10 Jul 2015 at 15:15

The clock is now running down. My appointment for pre assessment checks has arrived today for the end of the month. A phone call to RD&E has confirmed that I am provisionally scheduled for the 19th of August. It suddenly becoming very real and somewhat scary. I have been working down a list of things to complete before the op and trying to ensure I am prepared as I can be, but whilst I can deal with the practical side of things reasonably well the realisation of what is to come now seems somewhat daunting. Any suggestions from those who have been there before me gratefully received!

User
Posted 10 Jul 2015 at 16:15

Hi Dick -- You are going to be just Fine ok , Follow me Chris J , Raiden , Trailetrish and all the many others . We have 3 just had RP ok and were all besides ourselves with fear , but have got through so far . Private message me if you have ANY questions ok , or keep it on here . You have IMMENSE support and can ask anything you want without fear .
Best wishes Chris

User
Posted 10 Jul 2015 at 16:28

Hi Dick.B

I think everyone has their own way of dealing with their impending op / treatment.

For me the day of the operation couldn't come quickly enough, although I knew that life would be 'different' afterwards.

I never had much time to think about too much on the day itself other than hope for a good outcome.

Approx 24 hours later I was out of hospital with the offending gland removed and concentrating on my recovery.

My PCa was discovered by accident so I was grateful  to learn that I was still in the 'cure camp ' and able to have radical treatment.

Nearly 13 months on from my op I'm leading a pretty normal life..... my recovery to full continence is taking longer than I would have hoped for and my ED is improving ( I had 50% nerve sparing ) but on the whole I can't complain..

As someone on here once said, the biggest side effect is, I'm alive and well! http://community.prostatecanceruk.org/editors/tiny_mce/plugins/emoticons/img/smiley-smile.gif

You will be fine I'm sure, it's  normal to be a little apprehensive a few weeks beforehand.

Best Wishes

Luther

User
Posted 11 Jul 2015 at 06:58
Hi Dick,

As you know Stuart is now 2 days post op and will be coming home today, he was surprisingly good yesterday obviously uncomfortable but in good spirits. I am guessing it will be a but different when we are home as he won't have the safety of hospital and Nurses on tap! For preparation just make sure you buy some jogging bottoms to wear when you are home with the catheter bag which is strapped to your leg. I was also advised to buy pants 1 size bigger as your stomach will be swollen for a few days because of the gas they use to expand you to do the op. Also buy some Tena for Men level 2 pads, I bought 120 on Amazon for 40 pounds which is a bit cheaper than buying individual packs in Sainsbury. We also bough pyjamas with shorts which he was wearing yesterday in hospital they were a good buy. I can't think of anything else but I'm sure the others that are s bit further down the road will have some tips too.

Trish

User
Posted 11 Jul 2015 at 11:06

A bucket


Might not need to buy any Tena pads - with a bit of luck, Trish will be giving you Stuart's stock. 120 Trish??? I bought a pack of thirty and ended up throwing most of them away!

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

User
Posted 11 Jul 2015 at 11:36
Lyn I know LOL, the nurse found it very funny yesterday I am just one of those strange people who likes to be organised😜 Possibly a bit OTT I will probably be offering them in here in a few weeks!
User
Posted 11 Jul 2015 at 11:40

Most of my level 2 pads ( 160 ) came from a very nice man on this site , and I will probably pass them on soon . He got them for free in his NHS area

User
Posted 11 Jul 2015 at 11:51
Chris,

I am glad it seems that we wouldn't need much of these, I was imagining 1 month at 3 per day but obviously not ☺️☺️☺️

Trish

User
Posted 11 Jul 2015 at 12:08

Lets just hope you are one of the really lucky ones x

 
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