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Add aspirin trials

User
Posted 26 Sep 2015 at 19:49
Hi all,

A little birdie has informed me today that there is to be a new trial starting soon that is called "Add Asprin Trial" which will be offered to all cancer patients(not just prostate cancer patients")

The thoughts are that a daily dose of about 250 milligrams of Asprin will prevent cancer cells from growing ( not sure what other things as well) but it will only be offered to those that have just finished their Radio therapy. The Asprin will be taken every day for 3 months.

If anyone has heard about this as well and if there is any more information to add please let me know.

I know it is early days yet and I believe that approx10,000 people are to be trialed.

Sounds interesting , especially if it works and the cost will be minimal to the NHS.

What with this trial and the possibility of the EN2 test to replace the PSA testing the future could be bright...

Hope I am not jumping the gun but I know I am to be offered the trial when I finish my RT in November.

Regards Chris/woody

Life seems different when upside down take another viewpoint.

User
Posted 26 Sep 2015 at 22:05

Hi,

I feel as if I'm on that trial already.

Last November, I finished my Radiotherapy.  Exactly two weeks after, I had a heart attack which meant that I was started on a daily dose of asprin which will continue for the rest of my life.  So, even though it wasn't intentional, I am on my own trial.

The good news is that whatever happens, my PSA seems to be heading in the right direction, from 4.1 before RT to 0.040 now.  I'm happy with that.  Just need the heart to be properly sorted.

Steve

User
Posted 13 Nov 2015 at 22:10

Just a quick update......

I was enrolled onto the add Asprin trials yesterday and was speaking to my oncologist who informed me that I was the first person in the uk to be signed onto the trials.. Hey I have never been first at anything before, what a novel experience, I usually am just a person taking part that or if I buy a raffle ticket I do not win last prize!

On a serious note I am pleased to be part of some research that may help cancer sufferers one day.

Stay well, cheers Chris/ Woody

Life seems different upside down, take another viewpoint

User
Posted 27 Sep 2015 at 01:32
I asked my oncol about 3 months ago if there was anything else I should be taking, he said that there was some evidence to say that a baby asprin a day can reduce the effects of the cancer. Needless to say I have been taking one a day ever since!,

Edited by member 27 Sep 2015 at 16:38  | Reason: Not specified

Dream like you have forever, live like you only have today Avatar is me doing the 600 mile Camino de Santiago May 2019

User
Posted 27 Sep 2015 at 10:14
Hi,

I think that may been the computer or phone altering the word sometimes happens to me.

Steve

User
Posted 27 Sep 2015 at 12:07
Chris/Woody

that was almost certainy a predictive text error on Kev's device... daily aspirin tanscribed to baby adaption .. a bit like cancer cells mutating ! I have to say it is one of the reasons I switch off the "aid" on my tablet! It did make me smile on a sunny Sunday morning though.

A daiy dose of aspirin has been used in treating heart disease and stroke patients or those at risk of heart disease for many years now. It is thought to work by slightly thinning the blood.

In the cancer research field there has been some evidence to show that less sticky blood makes it more difficult for cancer cells to adhere to blood vessel walls. This may reduce their ability to invade the vascular system and therefore gain a free transport system to take them to the next destination (Mets or lymph node invasion). Given time the little horrors can actually build their own blood vessels so that theory may not hold good forever.

Also aspirin contains a basic natural ingredient (willow bark or meadowsweet) that is slightly toxic so it might help to kill off cancerous cells that have recently had their DNA messed up by RT. A kind of mini and less side effect strewn chemo.??

It is such a cheap drug so there is not much to lose trialling it and a lot to be gained if it works.

As a word of caution anyone with a history of bleeding disorders, ulcers, or already on drugs like warfarin do not start taking aspirin without consulting your medical practitioner.

The EN2 test you mentioned has been on the cards for quite a while but the initial study was done on such a small number of patients out of Surrey University. So it had to be tested on a much wider audience, It is proably going to be used to augment the PSA test not replace it. The PSA test will still indicate the possible presence of prostate cancer, the EN2 test is aiming to confirm the presence and possibly the size of a tumour (the higher the EN2 the bigger the tumour I guess) reading between the lines I think the EN2 test could also be used for detection of other cancers.

I think that will give GPs and other clinicians a better tool to treat (or not as the case may be) low grade very slow growing PCa. without the need for biopsies, scans etc. For patients they are not sure about or those who clearly have a much bigger problem all the traditional tests would still need to be done.

That leaves a bit of a problem possibly for many men, who knowing they have cancer no matter how small or currently inactive, just want rid of it out of their body right here and right now.

It is all positive steps forward though which is great news.

best wishes as always

xx

Mo

User
Posted 27 Sep 2015 at 15:38

Hi Guys,

An eminent doctor wrote a letter to the Times last winter, I am guessing January.

He specifically recommended a daily 75mg Asprin as treatment for prostate cancer.

I cut out the letter, showed it to my GP, she agreed and I have been on asprin ever since.

:)

Dave

User
Posted 27 Oct 2015 at 19:54

I have nearly finished my RT (ends on 5th Nov) and have been approached to take part in the Add Asprin trials with the initial period of 8 weeks actually taking Asprin to see my tolerance levels. This will start straight after me RT ends next week.

My view is that even if I end up taking the placebo tablet it will be for the good of future PCa patients.

There is a 2 in 1 chance of being on Asprin anyway so that's better than evens odds. If there are any signs of cancer reoccurring it will be treated as it would if I was not on the trials, so I will not have lost anything by taking part. If at anytime I do not want to continue the trial I can just let them know and stop straight away.

Neither my doctor or myself will know what tablet I will be taking but should an emergency occur, my doctor will be able to find out which one I am on.

There will be initial blood tests and this will be followed up every three months for the first year then six monthly thereafter, they will also need a sample of my cancer (already taken from biopsies) for them to keep and run tests on.

It will be for a minimum term of 5 years but may go on for longer. I told the organisers that it would be good to give something back after getting so much up to date treatment that was probably pioneered by others.

I have not signed up fo it yet and if anyone on the forum thinks there are any reasons for not undergoing the trialit would be good to see your views

Let's have your views please.

Cheers Chris/Woody

Life seems different upside down, take another viewpoint

Edited by member 27 Oct 2015 at 20:00  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 28 Oct 2015 at 01:58

An inexpensive possibility if you want to try it but it is not suitable for everyone, particularly if you are already on certain drugs, so perhaps a good idea to check with GP before self medicating with asprin on a regular basis.

Barry
User
Posted 28 Oct 2015 at 09:43

Look out for the Aspirins labelled 'enteric coated' , the idea being they dissolve in the gut rather than the stomach where they can cause irritation. I've just started taking 75mg enteric coated aspirin a day, it's cheap and there seems to be enough evidence to convince me of the value of doing this regarding cancer and cardiac problems. I'm pretty healthy anyway as far as I know,  but any preventative measure has to be worth a try !

 

Fiona.

User
Posted 07 Nov 2015 at 12:52
Hi

I remember when I finished RT - it was such an emotional time, I was crying my eyes out. The people who I travelled with each day wondered what was up - it was a mixture of the emotion having completed the 37 sessions and missing everyone at the hospital, the staff who were really good, the people having treatment I met there every day. In spite of the situation we all had a good time of sharing and 99% were positive and encouraging and we had a good laugh together.

Keep well

Arthur

User
Posted 08 Nov 2015 at 11:09

Chris/Woody

It's not unusual to go on a bit of downer after RT ends as yes you miss the RT guys but after a couple of weeks it can also feel a bit like limbo land.

Hopefully you will be fine so that was just making you aware. If it does happen you will soon be bouncing back.

As HT turned you into a shopping browser yet. OH couldn't get me out of the shops :-)

Good luck on your journey.

Ray

Show Most Thanked Posts
User
Posted 26 Sep 2015 at 21:20

I have since found out that participants will be taking Asprin 300 mg/or 100mg/or a placebo for up to 5 years to see if Asprin affects cancer developing.

2,120 prostate cancer patients will be needed with a total of 11,000 altogether from 3 other cancer types as well.

There is no start date yet and it will only be available at participating hospitals.

All patients will be at the early stage of cancer treatment and at the end of their radio therapy treatment with Asprin being taken alongside their existing hormone therapy treatment plan

Obviously this I'll not help folk immediately but hopefully will be of benefit to others in years to come, fingers crossed.

Cheers Chris/Woody

Life seems different when upside down, take another viewpoint

User
Posted 26 Sep 2015 at 22:05

Hi,

I feel as if I'm on that trial already.

Last November, I finished my Radiotherapy.  Exactly two weeks after, I had a heart attack which meant that I was started on a daily dose of asprin which will continue for the rest of my life.  So, even though it wasn't intentional, I am on my own trial.

The good news is that whatever happens, my PSA seems to be heading in the right direction, from 4.1 before RT to 0.040 now.  I'm happy with that.  Just need the heart to be properly sorted.

Steve

User
Posted 27 Sep 2015 at 01:32
I asked my oncol about 3 months ago if there was anything else I should be taking, he said that there was some evidence to say that a baby asprin a day can reduce the effects of the cancer. Needless to say I have been taking one a day ever since!,

Edited by member 27 Sep 2015 at 16:38  | Reason: Not specified

Dream like you have forever, live like you only have today Avatar is me doing the 600 mile Camino de Santiago May 2019

User
Posted 27 Sep 2015 at 08:45

Hi Steve, I was thinking that if I started on them anyway it may be a good thing but will wait to see if I am offered the trial first.

I am glad the PSA is down for you lets hope it remains that way. Mine went down to 0.5 at my last test from 63 so was well happy.

Looks like you are stuck on Asprin but if there is a bye product of less chance that PCa getting any worse then that will be a good thing.

Keep taking the pills!

Regards Chris/Woody

Life seems different upside down take another viewpoint

User
Posted 27 Sep 2015 at 08:46

I run, what is a baby adaption? Not heard of that at all..

User
Posted 27 Sep 2015 at 10:14
Hi,

I think that may been the computer or phone altering the word sometimes happens to me.

Steve

User
Posted 27 Sep 2015 at 12:07
Chris/Woody

that was almost certainy a predictive text error on Kev's device... daily aspirin tanscribed to baby adaption .. a bit like cancer cells mutating ! I have to say it is one of the reasons I switch off the "aid" on my tablet! It did make me smile on a sunny Sunday morning though.

A daiy dose of aspirin has been used in treating heart disease and stroke patients or those at risk of heart disease for many years now. It is thought to work by slightly thinning the blood.

In the cancer research field there has been some evidence to show that less sticky blood makes it more difficult for cancer cells to adhere to blood vessel walls. This may reduce their ability to invade the vascular system and therefore gain a free transport system to take them to the next destination (Mets or lymph node invasion). Given time the little horrors can actually build their own blood vessels so that theory may not hold good forever.

Also aspirin contains a basic natural ingredient (willow bark or meadowsweet) that is slightly toxic so it might help to kill off cancerous cells that have recently had their DNA messed up by RT. A kind of mini and less side effect strewn chemo.??

It is such a cheap drug so there is not much to lose trialling it and a lot to be gained if it works.

As a word of caution anyone with a history of bleeding disorders, ulcers, or already on drugs like warfarin do not start taking aspirin without consulting your medical practitioner.

The EN2 test you mentioned has been on the cards for quite a while but the initial study was done on such a small number of patients out of Surrey University. So it had to be tested on a much wider audience, It is proably going to be used to augment the PSA test not replace it. The PSA test will still indicate the possible presence of prostate cancer, the EN2 test is aiming to confirm the presence and possibly the size of a tumour (the higher the EN2 the bigger the tumour I guess) reading between the lines I think the EN2 test could also be used for detection of other cancers.

I think that will give GPs and other clinicians a better tool to treat (or not as the case may be) low grade very slow growing PCa. without the need for biopsies, scans etc. For patients they are not sure about or those who clearly have a much bigger problem all the traditional tests would still need to be done.

That leaves a bit of a problem possibly for many men, who knowing they have cancer no matter how small or currently inactive, just want rid of it out of their body right here and right now.

It is all positive steps forward though which is great news.

best wishes as always

xx

Mo

User
Posted 27 Sep 2015 at 12:22

Thanks for that Mo,I had read some of that but you have filled in the big gaps for me (me being not medically minded so it pays to keep it simple for me lol).

I believe the EN2 test will be able to at least prevent the guys that have enlarged prostates from being unnecessarily worried as it is only cancer cells that the test picks up. So the PSA test will still be a guide but hopefully if used only when cancer is diagnosed, maybe, it will not suggested that they those with enlarged prostates need to undergo all the scans and the added worry of same before finding out that they do not have cancer.

Hope I have put that in the right words?

I still think it is a great step forward to being able to have a more accurate test for cancers and is cheap enough for the NHS to implement at doctors surgeries etc.

Regards, Chris/Woody

Life seems different upside down take another viewpoint.

User
Posted 27 Sep 2015 at 15:38

Hi Guys,

An eminent doctor wrote a letter to the Times last winter, I am guessing January.

He specifically recommended a daily 75mg Asprin as treatment for prostate cancer.

I cut out the letter, showed it to my GP, she agreed and I have been on asprin ever since.

:)

Dave

User
Posted 27 Oct 2015 at 19:54

I have nearly finished my RT (ends on 5th Nov) and have been approached to take part in the Add Asprin trials with the initial period of 8 weeks actually taking Asprin to see my tolerance levels. This will start straight after me RT ends next week.

My view is that even if I end up taking the placebo tablet it will be for the good of future PCa patients.

There is a 2 in 1 chance of being on Asprin anyway so that's better than evens odds. If there are any signs of cancer reoccurring it will be treated as it would if I was not on the trials, so I will not have lost anything by taking part. If at anytime I do not want to continue the trial I can just let them know and stop straight away.

Neither my doctor or myself will know what tablet I will be taking but should an emergency occur, my doctor will be able to find out which one I am on.

There will be initial blood tests and this will be followed up every three months for the first year then six monthly thereafter, they will also need a sample of my cancer (already taken from biopsies) for them to keep and run tests on.

It will be for a minimum term of 5 years but may go on for longer. I told the organisers that it would be good to give something back after getting so much up to date treatment that was probably pioneered by others.

I have not signed up fo it yet and if anyone on the forum thinks there are any reasons for not undergoing the trialit would be good to see your views

Let's have your views please.

Cheers Chris/Woody

Life seems different upside down, take another viewpoint

Edited by member 27 Oct 2015 at 20:00  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 28 Oct 2015 at 01:58

An inexpensive possibility if you want to try it but it is not suitable for everyone, particularly if you are already on certain drugs, so perhaps a good idea to check with GP before self medicating with asprin on a regular basis.

Barry
User
Posted 28 Oct 2015 at 09:43

Look out for the Aspirins labelled 'enteric coated' , the idea being they dissolve in the gut rather than the stomach where they can cause irritation. I've just started taking 75mg enteric coated aspirin a day, it's cheap and there seems to be enough evidence to convince me of the value of doing this regarding cancer and cardiac problems. I'm pretty healthy anyway as far as I know,  but any preventative measure has to be worth a try !

 

Fiona.

User
Posted 07 Nov 2015 at 08:19

Well that's it for the radio therapy, I don't know how anyone else has felt when their RT came to an end but I found that it was a huge relief and was very emotional as I said goodbye to all the fantastic staff at the new Oncology centre at Worcester Royal Hospital. I think the HT had a part to play in that as I have been a bit of a soppy cry baby in the two weeks following my implants.

As I was waiting for the last session it felt completely different from the previous 36.

Now seeing Trials nurse on Thursday to start "add Asprin trial" and Fiona the pills that are given are made up by the pharmaceutical company for the trials and all look identical so will not be labelled at all, they are supplied by the hospital pharmacy.

There are a quite a lot of medical hoops to jump through and forms to sign before commencing as they need to be sure about your medical histology before starting.

For those that that are not eligible for the trials then I would suggest that you see your doctor to get Asprin prescribed and it would be worthwhile trying to take them anyway if you can.


Edited by member 07 Nov 2015 at 11:39  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 07 Nov 2015 at 12:52
Hi

I remember when I finished RT - it was such an emotional time, I was crying my eyes out. The people who I travelled with each day wondered what was up - it was a mixture of the emotion having completed the 37 sessions and missing everyone at the hospital, the staff who were really good, the people having treatment I met there every day. In spite of the situation we all had a good time of sharing and 99% were positive and encouraging and we had a good laugh together.

Keep well

Arthur

User
Posted 08 Nov 2015 at 08:37

Thanks Arthur, that is exactly how I felt and, as you say, the other people that are having treatment that you share information with. It must be the common bond and camerardery of all being in the same boat.
Mind you with the hormone therapy I can cry at the drop of a hat, it is a good job my wife understands but she keeps telling me "now you know what it's like to be a woman" even my onco said the same and she was serious!

Cheers, Chris/Woody

Life seems different upside down, take another viewpoint

User
Posted 08 Nov 2015 at 11:09

Chris/Woody

It's not unusual to go on a bit of downer after RT ends as yes you miss the RT guys but after a couple of weeks it can also feel a bit like limbo land.

Hopefully you will be fine so that was just making you aware. If it does happen you will soon be bouncing back.

As HT turned you into a shopping browser yet. OH couldn't get me out of the shops :-)

Good luck on your journey.

Ray

User
Posted 13 Nov 2015 at 22:10

Just a quick update......

I was enrolled onto the add Asprin trials yesterday and was speaking to my oncologist who informed me that I was the first person in the uk to be signed onto the trials.. Hey I have never been first at anything before, what a novel experience, I usually am just a person taking part that or if I buy a raffle ticket I do not win last prize!

On a serious note I am pleased to be part of some research that may help cancer sufferers one day.

Stay well, cheers Chris/ Woody

Life seems different upside down, take another viewpoint

 
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