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Still Running

User
Posted 20 May 2016 at 01:16
I'm now 18 months since my diagnosis with PCa and I have been on HT and enzalutamide on A Stampede Trial.

I've always thought that keeping reasonably fit might help slow the cancer down and so far my psa is still at below 0.1.

Though the Medication increases fatigue I've continued running but am reducing my distances from half Marathons I used to do to 10km.

So this Sunday I'm running the Manchester 10k. Im still finding it tough going.

Before I entered the race my Sister in Law Julie was diagnosed with Motor Neuron Disease and so I decided to run for the MNDA charity .

Julie unfortunately passed away last month so I'm running in her memory.

MND is such a terrible disease and I've watched as Julie went through the torture. Thankfully now she is free from that and is at peace.

If anyone would like to donate and support me in my run then please go to my just giving page at

Https://www.justgiving/Paul-Jackson62.

Any donation would be much appreciated.

Even though I'm not running for PCUK I have been interviewed by The Mancunian (which is the largest on line Student Newspaper) and they have promised to publish my story of living with PCa and of the run. So we should at least get some good publicity within the Students population.

Thanks for reading this

Paul

Edited by member 20 May 2016 at 20:45  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 30 May 2016 at 09:44
I agree so much with Nidge, after the initial emotion of diagnosis came the realisation that I will not die tomorrow but just way sooner than I had previously hoped. So I set myself 5 targets in life :-

1) no regrets from then on

2) enjoy myself/live life to the full (but never to the detriment of others)

3) create positive memories for everyone I come into contact with

4) raise awareness for PC

5) raise funds for PCUK

So everything I do, without exception has to tick ( at least) one of the above , running fits that bill even if it is harder than ever. When I completed the Marathon Des Sables last month it was initially for no regrets and selfish however it quickly became a fundraiser for PCUK, then unexpectedly my family and friends made me feel so humble with so much pride and support in what I was doing with my wife and kids so happy for me that I am stil "living" then finally the press both locally and nationally have been over it too. Most recently I have been "cover boy" on my works internal 2 monthly magazine which has been circulated to over 60,000 staff , drawn in another couple of thousand sponsorship from around 100 people, had several hundred positive comments and pushed awareness. On Thursday the chief exec of my company called me to have a "chat" and said he will see what he can do to get more support for the "cause".

So to everyone reading this, don't give up until you have to, find your own inspiration and maybe go outside your comfort zone to tick some more boxes to help others eg I also organised a golf day last Monday with a friend, nothing to do with a club, I don't even play golf but just " rented " a course for an afternoon, had 10 teams , lots of awareness and raised £4,500 net for the charity.

Maybe I should change my name from Irun to Forrest Gump!

Kev

Dream like you have forever, live like you only have today Avatar is me racing in the Sahara April 2018

User
Posted 20 May 2016 at 10:13
Paul,

Good luck with your run and the link for the charity. I'm sorry about your sister in law. I have lost 2 very close friends to MND in recent years and know just awful it is. Please let us know when your interview is available to read. Pleased too for you that your Psa score is below 0.

John

User
Posted 20 May 2016 at 11:08

Good luck Paul and condolences on the loss of your sister in law

We can't control the winds - but we can adjust our sails
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User
Posted 20 May 2016 at 10:13
Paul,

Good luck with your run and the link for the charity. I'm sorry about your sister in law. I have lost 2 very close friends to MND in recent years and know just awful it is. Please let us know when your interview is available to read. Pleased too for you that your Psa score is below 0.

John

User
Posted 20 May 2016 at 11:08

Good luck Paul and condolences on the loss of your sister in law

We can't control the winds - but we can adjust our sails
User
Posted 20 May 2016 at 19:22
Sandra

Thanks so much for your kind donation.

It gives me such a boost to complete the run

Thanks again

Paul

Ps

It's good to read that your Johns PC seems to be under control.

User
Posted 20 May 2016 at 20:18

Grit your teeth - only £5 off your target with nearly 2 days to go x

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

User
Posted 20 May 2016 at 20:35
I'll donate mate, how incredibly sad xxx
User
Posted 20 May 2016 at 20:40
Lynn

I've got to admit I do keep moving the goalposts as the target gets closer.

Thanks very much for your donation.

It his year I'd got a place again in. The Leeds Half Marathon but chickened out - I just could not have got up those hills.

Maybe next year?

Paul

User
Posted 20 May 2016 at 21:58

GNR first my friend - perhaps we could do the Leeds half as a team entry instead but bagsy I don't get the Stonegate Road drag

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

User
Posted 20 May 2016 at 23:20
But who else would do that climb.

😎

User
Posted 21 May 2016 at 00:54

Hi Paul,

The very Best of Luck in the race and thank you for running for such a good cause.  I lost my father-in-law to MND 21 years ago so I understand how you feel and what you've been through.  I was with him when he died and I wouldn't want anyone to go through that. 

I'm so sorry.

Steve

User
Posted 21 May 2016 at 09:21
Paul

condolences on the loss of your Sister In Law, MND is a horrid disease, so any research that provides answers that may give sufferers and their families respite or just hope has to be worthwhile.

I will donate and good luck with the run.

xx

Mo

User
Posted 22 May 2016 at 23:38

Well I finished the Manchester 10k ok albeit slower than last time. It was as usual a great experience and although very hard due to the fatigue well worth the effort.

I had some magnificent support and I'd like to thank all my sponsors and those that wished me well.
I was able to raise £415 towards MNDA .

I'm thinking that's my last run now but then I always think that.

Thanks again everyone

Paul x

User
Posted 22 May 2016 at 23:48

Paul,

Well done. 

I watched some of the coverage on TV.  Looks as if it was quite warm.

Keep running when you can.

Steve

User
Posted 23 May 2016 at 05:10

well done paul, am fully aware of how hard running is

regards
nidge

run long and prosper

'pooh how do you spell love'

'piglet you dont spell love -you just feel it'

User
Posted 23 May 2016 at 06:26
Paul,

Really pleased for you that you completed the run. Raising money for any charity is always worthwhile. Congratulations on the amount raised.

John

User
Posted 23 May 2016 at 07:40

Well done Paul.

We can't control the winds - but we can adjust our sails
User
Posted 23 May 2016 at 09:07
A great achievement Paul for a deserving cause. Very well done .

Kind regards,

Kevan

User
Posted 27 May 2016 at 17:58

Hello all,

Here is the web page of the article in the MancunianMatters re my run.
It makes much mention about Prostate Cancer as well as MNDA for whom I was running this time.

Hope it helps to promote some more awareness

Every bit counts.

I will run it again next year

Paul

http://www.mancunianmatters.co.uk/content/270575926-keep-running-prostate-cancer-sufferer-cherishes-memory-sister-law-great-manchester

Edited by member 27 May 2016 at 18:12  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 27 May 2016 at 18:20
Paul ,

I've just read the feature, thanks for the info. Here's to many more for you.

John

User
Posted 28 May 2016 at 05:23

brilliant article, makes me feel more determined to keep running, thanks

 

regards

nidge http://community.prostatecanceruk.org/editors/tiny_mce/plugins/emoticons/img/smiley-smile.gif

 

 

run long and prosper

'pooh how do you spell love'

'piglet you dont spell love -you just feel it'

User
Posted 28 May 2016 at 20:17
Hi Paul,

A great article which I'm sure will help many. Well done for taking part.

Like Nidge, reading it inspired me to want to try and start running again. Just got to get my body to agree!

Steve

User
Posted 29 May 2016 at 15:00

Steve and Nidge

I've got to say that after I'd finished I said I'll not do another and that's taking 15 minutes longer than my personal best.
Since then my daughter and niece (neither of who have done a 10k) will run with me next year so to keep me motivated.
So sounds like I'm going to have to buy yet another pair of running shoes.

I find that the hardest things about running with PCa is the motivation, the fatigue, heavy legs, getting enough air in my lungs and sweating heavily due to the hot flushes. I've not too much difficulty yet with my mobs bouncing about. (Not a 36+ yet)

Yes you guys and anyone else once you have control of the motivation you're past the hardest.
Good look to you all

Paul

User
Posted 29 May 2016 at 21:15

Hi Paul,

Sounds like you're on course for next year then.

I'm going to try and do the men's Race for Life again this year but I will probably have to walk most of it. Hoping that coming off hormone therapy at the end of June helps me out a bit but it's probably a bit soon to hope for as the race is at the end of July.

Steve

Edited by member 30 May 2016 at 01:22  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 30 May 2016 at 05:32

hi healey

my biggest motivation is thinking about regretting anything, we need to push the boundries as much now as we did before, the long runs where tough before and I treat the runs now just the same

 

regards

nidge

run long and prosper

'pooh how do you spell love'

'piglet you dont spell love -you just feel it'

User
Posted 30 May 2016 at 09:44
I agree so much with Nidge, after the initial emotion of diagnosis came the realisation that I will not die tomorrow but just way sooner than I had previously hoped. So I set myself 5 targets in life :-

1) no regrets from then on

2) enjoy myself/live life to the full (but never to the detriment of others)

3) create positive memories for everyone I come into contact with

4) raise awareness for PC

5) raise funds for PCUK

So everything I do, without exception has to tick ( at least) one of the above , running fits that bill even if it is harder than ever. When I completed the Marathon Des Sables last month it was initially for no regrets and selfish however it quickly became a fundraiser for PCUK, then unexpectedly my family and friends made me feel so humble with so much pride and support in what I was doing with my wife and kids so happy for me that I am stil "living" then finally the press both locally and nationally have been over it too. Most recently I have been "cover boy" on my works internal 2 monthly magazine which has been circulated to over 60,000 staff , drawn in another couple of thousand sponsorship from around 100 people, had several hundred positive comments and pushed awareness. On Thursday the chief exec of my company called me to have a "chat" and said he will see what he can do to get more support for the "cause".

So to everyone reading this, don't give up until you have to, find your own inspiration and maybe go outside your comfort zone to tick some more boxes to help others eg I also organised a golf day last Monday with a friend, nothing to do with a club, I don't even play golf but just " rented " a course for an afternoon, had 10 teams , lots of awareness and raised £4,500 net for the charity.

Maybe I should change my name from Irun to Forrest Gump!

Kev

Dream like you have forever, live like you only have today Avatar is me racing in the Sahara April 2018

 
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