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going on a bike and riding a bike bike riding

User
Posted 16 Mar 2017 at 20:45

tried posting a query about cycling.  Filled in a long post giving background and detail but that was rejected, apparently.

 

The site would not allow it and will not allow cut and paste from a word doc.

 

Do I need to worry about cycling?

 

dave

Do all you can to help yourself, then make the best of your time. :-)
User
Posted 06 Apr 2017 at 13:47

I've looked into this being a keen cyclist. Having had hormone therapy and radiotherapy followed by a recent TURP procedure, I've been on and off the bike. My intention when I start back in May is not to take very long rides that it takes time to recover from, thereby keeping my immune system at the optimum. There has been a small study which said that the cyclists riding more than nine hours a week were more prone to prostate cancer. I think there could be a number of factors at play here, including the amount of energy products they consume (loaded with dairy and sugar), sun screens they might use, as well as the effect of fatigue on the immune system.

Although I've not had a prostatectomy, I have invested in a new saddle to maximise comfort.

I feel the fitness benefits, the fresh air and the social aspect outweigh any potential risk.

I hope this helps.

 

 

User
Posted 06 Apr 2017 at 14:03

Hello Dave
You did have a big post up a while ago about cycling. I reckon there is more danger of getting splattered by a lorry than damaging your prostate. Go for it. Ride ride ride. Don't forget to stop regularly for refreshments during the summer , and remember that a pint of beer is 90% water so it's good for you .........

If life gives you lemons , then make lemonade

User
Posted 10 Apr 2017 at 07:34

Hi Gordon,

Not been ignoring you, its taken me 3 days to access the site.

My PSA tests followed the guidelines until I moved house and surgery in 2015. The new GP wanted their own data, and I was tested 3 monthly. The 3 monthly testing was allowed to run, the GP surgery did not stop it, I did not mention it, until it was looked at and I am now back to 6 months for a year. So I should be tested again in July?

My PSA readings post op:

25/10/13 - 0.05

14/01/14 - 0.05

22/04/14 - 0.01

15/10/14 - 0.1

24/03/15 - 0.1

29/05/15 - 0.1

24/08/15 - 0.001

26/11/15 - 0.01

05/08/16 - 0.1

20/01/17 - 0.02

Initially I was worried about my next reading, the wait for the result occupied my mind constantly for the 3 days I had to wait. I am so fortunate that my readings have been as they are for 4 years now.

I no longer worry about it. It will be what it will be. If something happens I'll deal with it. I am inspired by the stories and accounts of others here who are dealing with situations, their attitudes. There is hope in their treatment and recovery.

All that said I am considering at least 6 monthly tests even if I have to pay for the 6 month one. Maybe even extra tests at 3, 6 and 9 months as well? Or maybe at 4 and 8 months? My reasoning is that if I am tested and all clear on 01 January one year, but my next annual test shows a rise, I want to make sure that rise is detected as soon as reasonably practicable, and then start any treatment.

You will discuss what you and your wife feel is best for you both, and your diagnosis?

I get on with my life. I was diagnosed with PCa. It was dealt with. Life is great.

There is no point worrying so much about tomorrow that you forget to enjoy today. Achieving acceptance of what will be, and getting to that state of mind can take time.

atb

dave

Edited by member 10 Apr 2017 at 07:35  | Reason: Not specified

Do all you can to help yourself, then make the best of your time. :-)
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User
Posted 06 Apr 2017 at 13:47

I've looked into this being a keen cyclist. Having had hormone therapy and radiotherapy followed by a recent TURP procedure, I've been on and off the bike. My intention when I start back in May is not to take very long rides that it takes time to recover from, thereby keeping my immune system at the optimum. There has been a small study which said that the cyclists riding more than nine hours a week were more prone to prostate cancer. I think there could be a number of factors at play here, including the amount of energy products they consume (loaded with dairy and sugar), sun screens they might use, as well as the effect of fatigue on the immune system.

Although I've not had a prostatectomy, I have invested in a new saddle to maximise comfort.

I feel the fitness benefits, the fresh air and the social aspect outweigh any potential risk.

I hope this helps.

 

 

User
Posted 06 Apr 2017 at 14:03

Hello Dave
You did have a big post up a while ago about cycling. I reckon there is more danger of getting splattered by a lorry than damaging your prostate. Go for it. Ride ride ride. Don't forget to stop regularly for refreshments during the summer , and remember that a pint of beer is 90% water so it's good for you .........

If life gives you lemons , then make lemonade

User
Posted 06 Apr 2017 at 15:22

CB, you did ask this recently so I will give you the same response as I did then ... you don't have a prostate so stop worrying and get on your bike. The only issue with cycling is that it may delay the nerve repair and increase the risk of permanent ED in the weeks after RP ... you are way past that stage my friend.

Digger, that survey must have been very small scale as it is completely at odds with large scale research on this. Frequent cyclists (professionals and very frequent amateurs) were shown to have higher than average pSA but no more likely to get prostate cancer than any other group of men. The guidance issued to urologists as a result was to consider the PSA of frequent cyclists in conjunction with other information / signs / indicators to reduce the number of unnecessary biopsies in that group.

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

User
Posted 06 Apr 2017 at 15:55

As keen cyclists ourselves I wanted OH to hear directly that it was OK to get back on his bike post RARP and the resounding answer from our Urologist is that it is perfectly fine and will do no harm whatsoever. Yippeee.

User
Posted 06 Apr 2017 at 23:59
Hi Dave

Just reading your profile. When is your next PSA test now ?

I'm still on 3 monthly incidentally, until the 'system' twigs. .

Gordon

User
Posted 07 Apr 2017 at 00:06

Originally Posted by: Online Community Member

As keen cyclists ourselves I wanted OH to hear directly that it was OK to get back on his bike post RARP and the resounding answer from our Urologist is that it is perfectly fine and will do no harm whatsoever. Yippeee.

 

Unusual circumstance though wife as your OH has already recovered full erectile function. Many urologists would say not to ride a bike for 3 or 6 months post op - our uro said it would have made the effort of nerve-sparing pointless.  

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

User
Posted 07 Apr 2017 at 18:24

Gordon, are you asking ME when my next PSA is?

The site is playing up again. so I am unclear.

If you are asking me, I am now on 6 monthly checks. Robotic RP was 13 May 2013.

As I understand it the first year post op you are tested after the op, then 3 monthly. Year 2 six monthly. If all okay, thereafter annually.

I was lucky, I think I was lucky, in that I was teased 3 monthly for about 2 - 3 years until the GP sussed, and then went 6 monthly. I am due again in July ish, might well sneak on early and get one in at 5 months.

Have a good weekend all.

dave

Do all you can to help yourself, then make the best of your time. :-)
User
Posted 07 Apr 2017 at 22:48
Hi Dave.

Thanks. I was unsure of what you had been recommended as your psa was 0.02. So unclear if you are offered a re test in case in error or at 3 months in case you felt you needed a quicker test. I've read profile. Or do you get on with life as you say and only get concerned if rise continues. . My wife today discussed the merits of quaterly or annual tests. She is very supportive and knowledgable as we have both learnt a great deal since op. In many ways I think she feels more anxious awaiting results than me now albeit only a couple a days per quarter. We have been very fortunate.

Gordon

User
Posted 10 Apr 2017 at 07:34

Hi Gordon,

Not been ignoring you, its taken me 3 days to access the site.

My PSA tests followed the guidelines until I moved house and surgery in 2015. The new GP wanted their own data, and I was tested 3 monthly. The 3 monthly testing was allowed to run, the GP surgery did not stop it, I did not mention it, until it was looked at and I am now back to 6 months for a year. So I should be tested again in July?

My PSA readings post op:

25/10/13 - 0.05

14/01/14 - 0.05

22/04/14 - 0.01

15/10/14 - 0.1

24/03/15 - 0.1

29/05/15 - 0.1

24/08/15 - 0.001

26/11/15 - 0.01

05/08/16 - 0.1

20/01/17 - 0.02

Initially I was worried about my next reading, the wait for the result occupied my mind constantly for the 3 days I had to wait. I am so fortunate that my readings have been as they are for 4 years now.

I no longer worry about it. It will be what it will be. If something happens I'll deal with it. I am inspired by the stories and accounts of others here who are dealing with situations, their attitudes. There is hope in their treatment and recovery.

All that said I am considering at least 6 monthly tests even if I have to pay for the 6 month one. Maybe even extra tests at 3, 6 and 9 months as well? Or maybe at 4 and 8 months? My reasoning is that if I am tested and all clear on 01 January one year, but my next annual test shows a rise, I want to make sure that rise is detected as soon as reasonably practicable, and then start any treatment.

You will discuss what you and your wife feel is best for you both, and your diagnosis?

I get on with my life. I was diagnosed with PCa. It was dealt with. Life is great.

There is no point worrying so much about tomorrow that you forget to enjoy today. Achieving acceptance of what will be, and getting to that state of mind can take time.

atb

dave

Edited by member 10 Apr 2017 at 07:35  | Reason: Not specified

Do all you can to help yourself, then make the best of your time. :-)
User
Posted 10 Apr 2017 at 12:03

Hi Dave

Thanks for clarification.  I now understand looking at your results.   Mine have always been at same lab and same dec. places

so far easier to analyse.    ie < 0.01 and to date every 3 months.   (so no idea if mine is or was 0.001 )

All these can therefore be 0.001 ? Agree     24/08/15 - 0.001  26/11/15 - 0.01    05/08/16 - 0.1

Maybe cut / paste results into your profile, as posts tend to get lost and these are helpful to see the result of differing  labs  ?

One value won't show trend as you know,   so  20/01/17 - 0.02 could even be a inaccurate value and only of use if your next test is to 2 dec places (or 3).     I assume folks like us with in theory no prostate cells at all, PSA values shouldn't go up and down.  However I understand 'other glands' do produce PSA and obviously tests have 'background noise' (temp/calibration etc etc)

We are talking minuscule amounts.    I assume yours are always done at the same lab now.

To answer your question : July seems a good time for you.  I will organise mine circa. June (which will be 5 months)

 

 

 

Best Wishes

Gordon

User
Posted 11 Apr 2017 at 09:07

Morning Gordon,

The results are all low, and I am aware that there are various factors that can affect the readings, such as: calibration of machine, different machine, for all I know grubby petri dish or slide?

In theory, after RRP we should not have a PSA reading, but then women have PSA readings.  In theory everyman who has the same RRP should recover the same way.  Unfortunately we do not live in theory.

Your question as to whether they can all be regarded as 0.001?  My levels are all "there or thereabouts".  From the patients perspective, not an ideal situation given the potential consequences of raised readings for us, but there we go.  It is what it is.  

The upshot is I am not going to worry until I am told I need to.  

I would not tell anyone else to view their situation like this, but if and when they get their head around the issue, they may reach the state of acceptance and calmness that comes with time.  Well, time and some good readings under their belt.

Good luck for June.

dave

Do all you can to help yourself, then make the best of your time. :-)
User
Posted 13 Apr 2017 at 00:35
Hi Dave

Thanks for response. Forum is great as I didn't realise all the anomalies of testing etc.. so much better aware and informed.

Gordon

 
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