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PSA Increase After Stopping Prostap

User
Posted 09 May 2018 at 10:23

I am now 51 years old...

It is just over 2 years since I was diagnosed with PC and just under 2 years since I had a prostatectomy. I also had 6 1/2 weeks of radiotherapy and then I was put on the Prostap hormone injection which I hated.

I became depressed and separated from my wife but my PSA came down to 0.004 which I understand is the lowest it can be...?

I asked my consultant if I could come of the injections because of the side-effects and she agreed.

My last injection was October 2017 but I still get some side-effects such as hot sweats. I also have complete ED which is being treated separately.

I have just had another PSA test and my reading is now 0.1

I don't see my consultant until mid-June but I am guessing that the rise is because I have stopped having the Prostap injection.

Has anyone else seen a similar rise in their PSA after stopping Prostap and is the rise considered normal?

I have absolutely no interest in going back to the injection...

On a side note, I am still separated from my wife although we now talk, I am on medication for my depression and I feel 100% better than I did a year ago!

Prostate Cancer didn't take my life but boy did it take some of it away!

Keep fighting...

User
Posted 09 May 2018 at 17:03

AJC67,

It looks as though you have changed from the ultra sensitive test to the usual one, judging by the decimal p!aces. Are you sure the 0.1 was not <0.1? If so, no difference and nothing to worry about. If not, you need to bear in mind that it will probably take 18 months to clear the HT from your system and until then you won't really know what your new "normal" is going to be. Again no worries yet. I'd add that a small amount of PSA is produced from your adrenal gland and it may be that in your case 0.1 or a little more is "normal". I'd speak to your urologist or specialist nurse about all this, rather than taking anything I suggest as gospel though!!

AC

User
Posted 09 May 2018 at 17:08

John had RP 8 years ago and salvage RT 6 years ago - he has been bumbling along at 0.09 - 0.11 for a couple of years now. Onco says if it goes any higher then we will need to accept that the treatments did not get rid of the cancer but until we get to that point we are assuming he just has a naturally high PSA production.

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

User
Posted 25 Sep 2018 at 22:52

I was on Zoladex for three years and my PSA was constant at 0.6. I stopped the injections two years ago and my PSA has been between 0.1 - 0.6. My latest test, last month,  shows a sudden increase to 2.9. I have no idea why this has happened. I see the consultant in January and expect some info then. Hopefully my PSA will not rise any more.

User
Posted 26 Sep 2018 at 00:27
You still have a prostate and the healthy cells will have regenerated by now which means they produce PSA. 2.9 is a little higher than you would hope but doesn't necessarily mean you will need more treatment. January seems a long time to wait though - perhaps contact the onco's secretary to see if you can bring the appointment forward?
"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

User
Posted 26 Sep 2018 at 14:06

Thanks for your reply. I saw the oncologist  last January ( my PSA was 0.1) and he said I am where I should be and made my appointment in a years time. I saw the urology nurse in June when my PSA had risen to 2.8 and was given my next appointment also in a years time (next june) so I am now seeing someone every six months instead of the previous 3 monthly. I took it on myself to see my GP in August and asked for my PSA to be checked because of the sudden increase. It  had only risen to 2.9, which is in the normal range. I can wait for my next appointment in January unless this sudden increase is indicative of anything serious. 

 
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