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Having an operation

User
Posted 15 Jun 2018 at 13:07

I apologise in advance if this is a rather daft question to ask!


I'm hopefully nearing the end of my diagnostic road. I've been diagnosed thus far with Gleason 3+3 PCa via an mpMRI and a TRUS biopsy, but my oncologist is concerned that this doesn't really gel with my PSA score of 31, so he suspects something more advanced or active may be lurking in the parts that a TRUS can't reach (although nothing showed up on the MRI), and has recommended me for a template biopsy under general anaesthetic.


I'm not the least bit concerned about the biopsy itself. My question is simply this: I've managed to reach my current advanced age (55) never having had an operation under general anaesthetic. Can someone tell me what actually happens when you have a general anaesthetic? Ie how is it done? Presumably (at least I certainly hope so!) I'll just go to sleep and then wake up in a recovery ward elsewhere in the hospital?


Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Not concerned about the biopsy, just want to know what's likely to happen to me!


Thanks,


Chris


 

User
Posted 15 Jun 2018 at 14:15
Hi , I’m Cheshire Chris too from Wilmslow lol. I’m similar to you in that my psa hit 43 before surgery. Two TRUS were inconclusive , as was MRI. So I had template biopsy. The cancer was high at the back and against the bladder G9.
The day of the op is easy. They normally walk you to the theatre in your gown. You enter the anaesthetic room adjacent to the theatre. They hook you up to heart monitor etc and simply put a canular in the back of your hand. Mildly sore but ok. They then inject up to 3 medicines into your hand. Sometimes they place a mask near your face and ask you to breathe in. My anaesthetist said “ Havea good sleep — I hear this is great s**t “
Then you’re gone. No memories no nothing. I woke up with a stunning Portuguese nurse holding my hand and smiling. Often sore throat as they stick one of those tubes down your throat when you’re unconscious. You will also be very very thirsty so they have water. Once they satisfied you’re ok you get wheeled back to the ward. Good luck mate

If life gives you lemons , then make lemonade
User
Posted 15 Jun 2018 at 14:28

Thanks, Chris - that's very helpful to know. I've had cannulas stuck in me many times for CT scans, etc, so that's not a concern at all. My understanding is that I'll just be a day case, but I'm seeing the consultant tomorrow morning so I'll know more then.


REALLY hoping that they don't find anything more advanced (TRUS result was 8% positive cores on one side, 16% on the other, all Gleason 3+3), but they need to find out.


Thanks again,


Chris

Edited by member 15 Jun 2018 at 14:29  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 15 Jun 2018 at 14:30
I was given the option of general or spinal anaesthetic. I chose the spinal one (not had one of them before) which meant I was awake throughout the procedure. It's weird, and you get to see NHS in action. That was interesting. I would say if you go for the spinal option, be wary about drinking too much afterwards. All muscles around the bladder will be switched off, which means you will not be able to have a wee until they wake up again. I made the mistake of drinking lots (thinking this was a good idea!) and then ended up in severe pain, desperately waiting for my bladder to reactivate. As long as you keep your water intake low, I think it was more interesting and lower risk than a general.
User
Posted 15 Jun 2018 at 14:36

Absolutely nothing to worry about. You get down to the little room outside theatre, start chatting up the nurses whilst you just feel them putting in the cannula, you'll maybe get a nice whiff of entenox, then the next thing you know is that you are wide awake back in the ward asking for a cup of tea.
Ive had many ops, but Ive never rembered going to sleep nor waking up.
Except, that is, when I had my tonsils removed 65 years ago, when we had the swirling pits as we went off to sleep, and an hour of puking when we woke up.
Fantastic improvements in anaesthetics!!
You'll wake up with a pad between your legs to collect any little weeps of blood.
You'll pee a bit of blood first time, which stops very soon (half an hour or so), but then prove you can empty your bladder, then you are off home.
Enjoy your little rest😀

Edited by member 15 Jun 2018 at 14:37  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 15 Jun 2018 at 14:44

I chose a general, because the last time I had a spinal, my bladder wouldn't reactivate either. Lots of discomfort! Eventually I had a catheter fitted - never again!


This was in a knee replacement ward, and the bloke in the next bed couldn't stop peeing .We were lnown as Cant stop and Can't start

User
Posted 15 Jun 2018 at 14:54

Cheers, Tykey - that's very reassuring. I had quite heavy bleeding in my urine for about a week and a half after my TRUS, so I know to expect that.


Graham, I feel faint watching any medical procedure on TV, so have absolutely no wish to see one in the flesh - particularly when it's my flesh! I'm a total wimp when it comes to anything involving medical stuff, I'm afraid.


Chris

Edited by member 15 Jun 2018 at 14:58  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 15 Jun 2018 at 20:26

Originally Posted by: Online Community Member


 


This was in a knee replacement ward, and the bloke in the next bed couldn't stop peeing .We were lnown as Cant stop and Can't start




 

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard
User
Posted 16 Jun 2018 at 04:05

Originally Posted by: Online Community Member


my oncologist is concerned that this doesn't really gel with my PSA score of 31, so he suspects something more advanced or active may be lurking in the parts that a TRUS can't reach (although nothing showed up on the MRI), and has recommended me for a template biopsy under general anaesthetic



This is why I counsel people to avoid a TRUS biopsy (as indeed I was advised likewise by two friends) when possible, as all too often the TRUS is inaccurate and a subsequent template is required. There is one guy on here right now who has had two TRUS, now due a template - third time lucky?


A friend with BUPA coverage had a 3T mpMRI and a template biopsy within two weeks. No low-res MRI or TRUS biopsy were ever mentioned.


The template procedure is quite straightforward, wait around for hours nil by mouth, height, weight and BP check, go down to theatre, cannula fitted, big sleepies, wake up in “intensive care” for a few minutes, back on the ward. You are encouraged to eat and drink, and once you have urinated once or twice, can go home to watch a big purple, yellow and blue bruise develop on your perineum. I was out within four hours of going to theatre.


Not really any discomfort (it seems I am fine with modern anaesthetics), you will have pink urine for a couple of days and red/pink semen for a week or two. No big deal at all, and as it turns out, neither was my R.P.


And I am a big baby as far as pain is concerned!

Edited by member 16 Jun 2018 at 10:26  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 20 Jun 2018 at 10:38
I have had 2 template biopsies; both times I had spinal anaesthesia. Both times I went into theatre at 13:00 hrs and left the recovery ward for home by 17:00 hrs. No issues with peeing, absolutely no pain during the procedure and no pain afterwards once I learnt not to plonk myself down on a seat too roughly.
You don't see yourself being operated on as that part of you is not visible during the op.
User
Posted 20 Jun 2018 at 16:04
Another question about this. The hospital has said that I should "spend the night with someone" following the general anaesthetic. I live alone, so this might be rather difficult to arrange! Is this really essential and, if so, do you think that checking into a hotel for the night would suffice?

Thanks,

Chris
User
Posted 20 Jun 2018 at 16:43

Hi Chris, The after effects of general anaesthesia are such that you need to be with someone for the first 24 hours or so.


They also advise about not making any important decisions for a few days as there is reduced cognitive ability.


Is there no-one you could stay with or stay with you?


I realise this can be difficult. They may just have to keep you in hospital overnight.


 


Ian


  

User
Posted 20 Jun 2018 at 17:26
Thanks, Ian. I do have a friend who may be able to oblige. Failing that, I'll ask the hospital.

Cheers,

Chris
 
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