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PROSTATE CANCER SPREAD THROUGH SEMEN

User
Posted 21 Nov 2018 at 09:59

Dear All,

 

Please can u tell me if someone having prostate cancer . It can be transmitted while having  sexual activities through semen to women .

 

regards,

 

Aniket Bose

User
Posted 21 Nov 2018 at 10:42
No, it cannot. Prostate cancer (like all cancers) is not "infectious" and cannot be spread through bodily fluids (although some viruses which can lead to cancer such as HPV of course can be).

Chris

User
Posted 21 Nov 2018 at 12:38
Not semen maybe but it certainly can be spread by blood transfusion - or I assume that is why I am now banned from giving blood??
User
Posted 21 Nov 2018 at 15:19

Cancer cells can travel around your own body via the bloodstream (although most do so through the lymph system), but it doesn't get transferred from one person to another via the blood (or any other bodily fluid) in the way that a virus such as HIV can. The recipient's immune system would recognize the other person's cancer cells as a foreign body, and destroy them. The only real way that cancer can be transferred from one person to another is via tissue transplantation.

Chris

Edited by member 21 Nov 2018 at 15:30  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 21 Nov 2018 at 16:11
Bose, you do realise that women don't have prostates and therefore can't get prostate cancer?

AC

User
Posted 21 Nov 2018 at 20:24
Only because of the immune function as mentioned earlier not because it was PCa or the fact that they don’t have a prostate. It would be as mets in the bloodstream but they would hopefully be rejected.

And interestingly women do apparently have some cells that are similar if I recall.

Transgender women can get PCa too. A fact that is often forgotten.

User
Posted 22 Nov 2018 at 20:27
Women have Skene's glands, not a prostate. Cases of cancer in the gland are extremely rare but do happen. It would be silly to describe such cancer as Prostate Cancer, though it may be detectable through heightened PSA which can be produced minutely by these glands. There is a similarity therefore. A primary there could produce secondaries (mets) elsewhere in the woman's body, but talk of mets with no primary cancer is illogical.

I suppose eventually we are bound to have a case of a person who is a biological male but who self-defines as a woman and who is discovered to have prostate cancer. I think I'll go to bed with a blanket over my head when progress reaches that point.

AC

User
Posted 23 Nov 2018 at 01:07
Get your blanket AC - we have members of this forum who are transgender women with prostate cancer - there is a section of the forum devoted to this group. I think trans women with prostate cancer probably have the toughest ride of everyone - having to sit in a male clinic and explain yourself over and over to health professionals must be awful, it is bad enough for gay / bi men having to discuss the implications of treatment with medical staff who only really know about ED & sexual activity in straight men.

There are also recorded cases of PCa mets with no primary so not so illogical after all.

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

User
Posted 23 Nov 2018 at 10:36
Hi,

I recently contacted the Specialist Nurses with this question. I knew I couldn’t give my wife prostate cancer but was concerned that cells could be transferred which could cause her harm in other ways. Once again I received a full and helpful reply. Prostate cancer cells cannot be passed on or cause harm through sex.

Dave

User
Posted 23 Nov 2018 at 16:22
Damned hard to type this in the dark here...

AC

User
Posted 23 Nov 2018 at 19:35

Originally Posted by: Online Community Member
Damned hard to type this in the dark here...

AC

 

😂😂😂😂😂😂

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

User
Posted 08 Dec 2018 at 12:29
DEAR ALL,

THANKS FOR YOUR QUICK RESPONSE.ACTUALLY, MY WIFE LEFT ME FOR PROSTATE CANCER IS GENETIC AND I AM AFRAID THAT IT PASSED THROUGH SEMEN. I am 28 years old.recently, my father is diagnosed with prostate cancer.

REGARDS,

Bose

User
Posted 08 Dec 2018 at 12:40
Sorry to hear that. Do you think she used the prostate cancer as an excuse because she was unhappy? Did your dad's doctor explain to her that she couldn't catch it?
"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

User
Posted 08 Dec 2018 at 16:21
If Prostate or Breast Cancer is in a man's family, there is an increased risk of any male getting PCa but this does not mean that he will get it
Barry
User
Posted 08 Dec 2018 at 17:02
Indeed. According to the PCUK information sheet (which I'm inclined to trust), a close male relative having PCa increases your chance of getting it by 2.5x.

User
Posted 08 Dec 2018 at 18:27
But none of those statements support the idea tha5 it is genetic. Close relatives are often exposed to the same environmental factors, especially when they are still young boys. And since 70% of men get prostate cancer regardless of family history, it is more interesting to discuss who DOESN’T get it.

Cancer research stats have been simplified from other data I think - for example, the final point is supposed to read “I in 6 men are diagnosed with prostate cancer” which is rather different to “1 in 6 get it”

Regardless of that, I think Mr A has misinterpreted Bose. I don’t think he is claiming to know it is genetic; he is saying that his wife left him because she is frightened of it.

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

User
Posted 08 Dec 2018 at 18:51
With reference to mr angry's post, those stats suggest that the link is more envirnmental than genetic. i.e. you more at risk if your brother got it than if your father got it.

Cheers

Bill

User
Posted 08 Dec 2018 at 19:40

Yes but I stopped reading at the mention of RAF - based on the number of men that have passed through this forum over the years who either served in the RAF, flew commercially or tinkered with engines, you were doomed the day you signed up. 

 

Cancer Research UK is paraphrasing more detailed research so many of these statements are rather bald. Increased risk is specifically if the father or grandfather were diagnosed young - father diagnosed over the age of 60 had no increased risk according to the European study. Similarly with breast cancer - it was concluded that the risk of PCa was higher if a mother or other close female relative had been diagnosed young and many mothers would cook their own tea in the same old pans as their sons' food. My mum wrapped everything in clingfilm regardless of who was going to eat it :-/ 

 

Your instinct may be right Mr A that there is a genetic link in your family but based on what you say, it is perhaps more likely to be HOX or another gene rather than BRCA as you don't mention any very young diagnoses, ovarian cancer or pancreatic cancer in the family? 

Edited by member 08 Dec 2018 at 19:50  | Reason: Not specified

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

User
Posted 09 Dec 2018 at 20:25
With that history of 11/11 I would definitely be wondering about HOX and other gene faults but probably not BRCA 1 or 2.
"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

 
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