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Fatigue post robotic RP

User
Posted 19 Dec 2018 at 19:48

Now on day 8 following my robtic RP and begining to feel a bit more human but I am looking forward to the catheter coming out on Friday. Despite getting unbroken nights sleep and enjoying very restful days under the care of my wife, I find that I am still very tired. Is this the medication or due to operation itself? I am still taking codine since it’s the only thing that makes the catheter bearable. It is draining well and there is no infection but I have never really been very comfortable with it. I am otherwise feeling fine, but I did not expect to feel so tired. The cancer was localised and is hopefully gone, so I think that it is unlikely to be the cause.

Thanks

Alan

User
Posted 19 Dec 2018 at 20:34
It’s actually a much bigger operation than you think. I was 48 at my op and I think it took 4 1/2 hrs. That’s a lot of anaesthetic tbh and at day 8 I’m not surprised your still crackered , especially if you have a lovely wife tending to you. Drag it out lol ......

If life gives you lemons , then make lemonade

User
Posted 19 Dec 2018 at 20:45
You may have lost quite a bit of blood during the op, this will contribute to the fatigue as will codiene!

So long as you are not in significant pain or feverish it all sounds pretty normal after a major op

User
Posted 19 Dec 2018 at 20:06

The tiredness is a natural process as the body is healing itself... 

Your body has had a bit of a hammering lately... so it's to be expected..  I used to go back to bed for a snooze in the afternoon for a few weeks after my op.. 

Everyone's recovery rate is different....just go with the flow ( pun intended ) wink

Best Wishes 
Luther 


User
Posted 20 Dec 2018 at 05:47

If you click below you will see my contemporaneous notes made following my operation on a daily basis, and although I was skipping about from the moment I was discharged, there were days a while after surgery where I felt tired and didn’t leave the house until afternoon.

I didn’t need anyone to look after me, fortunately.

Get well soon.

Cheers, John.

https://community.prostatecanceruk.org/posts/t16224-Retzius-Sparing-Laparoscopic-Radical-Prostatectomy

Edited by member 20 Dec 2018 at 05:49  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 20 Dec 2018 at 08:23

Alan

I think once you have the catheter out you will breath a sigh of relief and things will rapidly improve. It takes time for the body to flush out all the anesthetic and medication etc.   I was back at work after four weeks, I did have a nap at lunchtimes, after six weeks I was driving all over the UK but needed to take sleep breaks on longer journeys.

Tomorrow is your trial without catheter day, the expectation is worse than the actual event, the removal should be a painless experience, but can feel quite weird. Stay calm and relaxed and you will sail through the process. Twoc at our hospital involes removal of the catheter followed by drinking water in a  "controlled and steady" manner and then having to pass two or three samples of urine, it can take between one and three hours depending  on how quickly the water passes through. I have had numerous twocs and never failed one, I  drink plenty of water (little and often) on the day. Listen to what the staff tell you. 

Make sure you have some pads for the journey home, if you are lucky you will not need them. I always took a  towel to put on the car seat just in case of accidents. Getting in and out of the car can make you leak as can standing up.

My first catheter got stuck on the way out, a senior nurse came across and gave it a quick pull out, no pain, but my surgeon blames that for my ongoing stricture, if it gets stuck get a consultant involved , he spent a long time sewing your urethra back together.

Hope all goes well best wishes.

Thanks Chris

 

 

 

 

User
Posted 20 Dec 2018 at 09:40
As already mentioned it is a big op and takes it out of you. Different people take it different ways. The codeine will tend to make you drowsy and I wouldn’t have thought you really need it now?

As also mentioned, there may have been some blood loss which definitely won’t help. You might hope that if significant enough to make you feel tired it would have been picked up and at least mentioned, but don’t bet on it.

I had big blood loss post op (known to operating hospital but not reported) and finished up at my local A&E after further losses needing a transfusion. I was flattened for weeks, but we knew why!

In your case, my thought (non-medical!) is that some fatigue at 8 days is still (just) in the normal range, but you ought to be coming out of it with in the next few days. I’d also strongly consider stopping the the codiene and using paracetamol/brufen instead as in addition to making you drowsy it can also cause constipation, which is not a happy combination with recent prostatectomy.

Worth mentioning the continuing fatigue to the nurses when you see them. I guess you’ll be having the catheter out soon, which will be a big step on the road to recovery, physically and psychologically.

Get well soon!

Nick

User
Posted 20 Dec 2018 at 12:18

Just a note of reassurance, my experience too was that I felt much more tired than previously for quite a while after the operation. Improvement was gradual rather than sudden.

The thing that made the most difference suggested there was a psychological element to it – when I started doing more adventurous things again despite the inconvenience of dependence on pads, it seemed to boost my general liveliness. But actually a little tiredness persisted long term, I seemed to feel exhausted and ready for bed earlier in the evening than I used to. Even two and a half years later I feel the effects if I don't get a full 8 hours sleep for a couple of nights on the trot.

(And by the way, I think the advice of moving off codeine and on to over-the-counter painkillers would be helpful).

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User
Posted 19 Dec 2018 at 20:06

The tiredness is a natural process as the body is healing itself... 

Your body has had a bit of a hammering lately... so it's to be expected..  I used to go back to bed for a snooze in the afternoon for a few weeks after my op.. 

Everyone's recovery rate is different....just go with the flow ( pun intended ) wink

Best Wishes 
Luther 


User
Posted 19 Dec 2018 at 20:34
It’s actually a much bigger operation than you think. I was 48 at my op and I think it took 4 1/2 hrs. That’s a lot of anaesthetic tbh and at day 8 I’m not surprised your still crackered , especially if you have a lovely wife tending to you. Drag it out lol ......

If life gives you lemons , then make lemonade

User
Posted 19 Dec 2018 at 20:45
You may have lost quite a bit of blood during the op, this will contribute to the fatigue as will codiene!

So long as you are not in significant pain or feverish it all sounds pretty normal after a major op

User
Posted 20 Dec 2018 at 05:47

If you click below you will see my contemporaneous notes made following my operation on a daily basis, and although I was skipping about from the moment I was discharged, there were days a while after surgery where I felt tired and didn’t leave the house until afternoon.

I didn’t need anyone to look after me, fortunately.

Get well soon.

Cheers, John.

https://community.prostatecanceruk.org/posts/t16224-Retzius-Sparing-Laparoscopic-Radical-Prostatectomy

Edited by member 20 Dec 2018 at 05:49  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 20 Dec 2018 at 08:23

Alan

I think once you have the catheter out you will breath a sigh of relief and things will rapidly improve. It takes time for the body to flush out all the anesthetic and medication etc.   I was back at work after four weeks, I did have a nap at lunchtimes, after six weeks I was driving all over the UK but needed to take sleep breaks on longer journeys.

Tomorrow is your trial without catheter day, the expectation is worse than the actual event, the removal should be a painless experience, but can feel quite weird. Stay calm and relaxed and you will sail through the process. Twoc at our hospital involes removal of the catheter followed by drinking water in a  "controlled and steady" manner and then having to pass two or three samples of urine, it can take between one and three hours depending  on how quickly the water passes through. I have had numerous twocs and never failed one, I  drink plenty of water (little and often) on the day. Listen to what the staff tell you. 

Make sure you have some pads for the journey home, if you are lucky you will not need them. I always took a  towel to put on the car seat just in case of accidents. Getting in and out of the car can make you leak as can standing up.

My first catheter got stuck on the way out, a senior nurse came across and gave it a quick pull out, no pain, but my surgeon blames that for my ongoing stricture, if it gets stuck get a consultant involved , he spent a long time sewing your urethra back together.

Hope all goes well best wishes.

Thanks Chris

 

 

 

 

User
Posted 20 Dec 2018 at 09:40
As already mentioned it is a big op and takes it out of you. Different people take it different ways. The codeine will tend to make you drowsy and I wouldn’t have thought you really need it now?

As also mentioned, there may have been some blood loss which definitely won’t help. You might hope that if significant enough to make you feel tired it would have been picked up and at least mentioned, but don’t bet on it.

I had big blood loss post op (known to operating hospital but not reported) and finished up at my local A&E after further losses needing a transfusion. I was flattened for weeks, but we knew why!

In your case, my thought (non-medical!) is that some fatigue at 8 days is still (just) in the normal range, but you ought to be coming out of it with in the next few days. I’d also strongly consider stopping the the codiene and using paracetamol/brufen instead as in addition to making you drowsy it can also cause constipation, which is not a happy combination with recent prostatectomy.

Worth mentioning the continuing fatigue to the nurses when you see them. I guess you’ll be having the catheter out soon, which will be a big step on the road to recovery, physically and psychologically.

Get well soon!

Nick

User
Posted 20 Dec 2018 at 12:18

Just a note of reassurance, my experience too was that I felt much more tired than previously for quite a while after the operation. Improvement was gradual rather than sudden.

The thing that made the most difference suggested there was a psychological element to it – when I started doing more adventurous things again despite the inconvenience of dependence on pads, it seemed to boost my general liveliness. But actually a little tiredness persisted long term, I seemed to feel exhausted and ready for bed earlier in the evening than I used to. Even two and a half years later I feel the effects if I don't get a full 8 hours sleep for a couple of nights on the trot.

(And by the way, I think the advice of moving off codeine and on to over-the-counter painkillers would be helpful).

 
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