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Bill Turnbull Update

User
Posted 26 Dec 2018 at 16:28

Hi All,


Dad and I agreed to participate in the recent news story on BBC Breakfast about the Turnbull/Fry effect, in order to raise greater awareness of prostate cancer and encourage men showing any kind of symptoms to get checked out without delay. It was thanks to Bill coming forward about his diagnosis that led to Dad being diagnosed. It was a priviledge to meet Bill who was humble, dignified and incredibly positive. Dad has now completed his radiotherapy for stage 3 PCa and appears to be doing well. His 1st follow up appointment with the consultant is at the end of January so we're keeping everything crossed. Please see below a link to the interview.


https://www.facebook.com/850649164/posts/10157079788829165/


Take care, Lisa x


 

User
Posted 26 Dec 2018 at 16:28

Hi All,


Dad and I agreed to participate in the recent news story on BBC Breakfast about the Turnbull/Fry effect, in order to raise greater awareness of prostate cancer and encourage men showing any kind of symptoms to get checked out without delay. It was thanks to Bill coming forward about his diagnosis that led to Dad being diagnosed. It was a priviledge to meet Bill who was humble, dignified and incredibly positive. Dad has now completed his radiotherapy for stage 3 PCa and appears to be doing well. His 1st follow up appointment with the consultant is at the end of January so we're keeping everything crossed. Please see below a link to the interview.


https://www.facebook.com/850649164/posts/10157079788829165/


Take care, Lisa x


 

User
Posted 27 Dec 2018 at 00:17
Thank you for posting and hope your Dad continues to do well.

It goes without saying that men exhibiting symptoms of PCa should go to their GP for a PSA and DRE as suggested by celebrities. However, PCa does not always cause symptoms to be exhibited and I think this should be made clear lest some affected men do nothing about being tested due to lack of symptoms, even if they are in more at risk groups.
Barry
User
Posted 27 Dec 2018 at 02:14
Quite right. Mine was found with the annual DRE. No other symptoms. Radiation early next month.
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User
Posted 27 Dec 2018 at 00:17
Thank you for posting and hope your Dad continues to do well.

It goes without saying that men exhibiting symptoms of PCa should go to their GP for a PSA and DRE as suggested by celebrities. However, PCa does not always cause symptoms to be exhibited and I think this should be made clear lest some affected men do nothing about being tested due to lack of symptoms, even if they are in more at risk groups.
Barry
User
Posted 27 Dec 2018 at 02:14
Quite right. Mine was found with the annual DRE. No other symptoms. Radiation early next month.
User
Posted 27 Dec 2018 at 06:18
I had no symptoms, and was refused a DRE. There was a seven year gap between my first PSA (2.2) and second (16.7).

Am I bitter? Yes, regarding the GP ‘care’, but not as far as the NHS hospital side who appear to have saved the day, (and my life).

Cheers, John.
User
Posted 27 Dec 2018 at 10:48

Whole-heartedly agree Barry. I encouraged by 69 year old neighbour to get his psa checked and his GP refused on the basis he had no symptoms. His wife called back the surgery and insisted he had one. Fortunately his PSA was normal but its worrying he had to fight for the psa test x

User
Posted 27 Dec 2018 at 11:42
After telling a friend I was playing golf with that I had no symptoms and was lucky enough to be picked up on routine blood test he went to his doctor for check, he was give blood test and DRE without any bother.
Fortunately he is all clear with a PSA of 1 and all ok with the DRE.
Being one of those that ignored fiends that told me I should be checked I am now the one telling them to get it done.

Bob
User
Posted 28 Dec 2018 at 20:38

Well done Lisa. That shows great ability to make an effect.  Your dad must be very pleased about the help you've given.

User
Posted 28 Dec 2018 at 21:54
Thank you Peter x
User
Posted 30 Dec 2018 at 22:20
My husband was persuaded not to have a psa test by a gp a few years ago because he had no symptoms and the test ‘could cause more problems than it solved.’
She told him to ‘come back if you ever get any symptoms’ despite a strong family history.
He never did get any symptoms but he did get diagnosed with PC out of the blue with a psa of over 6000 - and spread through his bones and lymph nodes.
User
Posted 31 Dec 2018 at 00:28
That makes my blood boil
"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard
User
Posted 31 Dec 2018 at 09:55

Sally, that's so sad to hear. I wonder if, like breast cancer, there will ever be a National Screening Programme for prostate cancer? My partner is 56 and Black so his liklihood of getting prostate cancer is 1 in 4. I'm insisting he has a psa test in the New Year. 

User
Posted 31 Dec 2018 at 12:03
I have my high blood pressure to thank for my detection.

I have to have regular blood tests to check that my medication is controlling my blood pressure and on one occasion the nurse said that they would take extra blood sample and run the full range of tests to include diabetes and PSA.
As I have had no symptoms of PCa apart from trips to the loo at night which I put down to my age I would never have been diagnosed.

Bob
User
Posted 31 Dec 2018 at 14:56

Originally Posted by: Online Community Member


Sally, that's so sad to hear. I wonder if, like breast cancer, there will ever be a National Screening Programme for prostate cancer? My partner is 56 and Black so his liklihood of getting prostate cancer is 1 in 4. I'm insisting he has a psa test in the New Year. 



I think there might be eventually but not until they invent a reliable test - the PSA test and DRE are too vague. There is also little motivation to introduce screening for all men due to the numbers involved - 60% of men in their 60s and 70% of men in their 70s have some cancer cells in their prostate but most never have any problems and are therefore never diagnosed .... the NHS couldn't cope with 70% of an ageing population accessing cancer services. PCUK and others are working on two developments - a prostate cancer test better than PSA and finding a way to determine which prostate cancers are the killers rather than pussy cats. 


In fact, the breast cancer programme is not a national screening programme - it is a reminder to women of a certain age that they may access a mammogram if they wish; but the leaflet spells out the negatives and risks and then says 'if you still want to go ahead, phone for an appointment'. GPs are supposed to offer something similar to men - it is set down in the prostate cancer risk management guidelines.


https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/prostate-specific-antigen-testing-explanation-and-implementation


The only true screening programmes in this country are the blood spot screening of new born babies and pregnancy screening, plus the screening of blood donors. Cervical screening (smear tests) and bowel screening for over 60s are the closest to true screening but even they are dependent on patient choice. 

Edited by member 31 Dec 2018 at 15:06  | Reason: Not specified

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard
User
Posted 31 Dec 2018 at 18:37

Improved and more accurate testing for prostrate cancer would be great. But, in the meantime, GP's and urologists need to be much more informed regarding the risks of PCa in men with a raised PSA - especially those men that don't have any symptoms.


Just found out why I wasn't biopsied, almost three years ago, with a PSA of 6.1.  Urologist wrote to my doctor with a diagnosis of prostatitis - no symptoms, no pain, no infection. Prescribed antibiotics.


Also just learned that my PSA was 6.8 the month before urologist discharged me back to GP.  At no point did anyone mention the risk of PCa and the fact my PSA had increased again after an initial drop. 


Assuming someone doesn't have PCa isn't good enough. 

User
Posted 31 Dec 2018 at 23:33

 I too went to gp with water retention at night a nighttime test was taken after which gp said no problem but come back if problem worsens.It does not but 12 months later total urine retention and one month later diagnosed with locally advanced cancer tb3 no mo!!! No dre test no psa test why??

User
Posted 01 Jan 2019 at 01:33
There is an urgent need for GP's to undergo instruction so that at least one of them in a Practice can be confidently consulted as necessary about potential PCa and treatment. It is almost always GP's who (sometimes much too late and in some cases who know less than some members on this forum about PCa) are responsible for instigating tests and making referrals or declining these.

Patients tend to trust their GP's and patients should be able to rely on their advice. Unfortunately, experience has shown that in too many cases Patient's faith in their GP has been misplaced and that with PCa at least, unless things change, men are going to have to become more knowledgeable and press GP's for more individual and careful scrutiny of their concerns.
Barry
User
Posted 01 Jan 2019 at 01:45
It shouldn’t be so difficult, should it. NICE published (and regularly updates) the prostate cancer risk management guidelines for GPs and young trainee GPs all get training on it so quite why so many men are refused tests or given crap responses like ‘don’t open a can of worms’ is completely beyond me. In my line of work, if professionals failed to follow guidance and someone was harmed as a result, they would probably be dismissed, potentially struck off and also possibly find themselves at the centre of an inquiry.
"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard
 
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