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Dads recent diagnosis.

User
Posted 11 Jan 2019 at 21:45

Hey all, 


 


After some information, advice, support not really sure just stumble across this doing the usual googling everything the doctor said. 


 


my dad was diagnosied yesterday with g7 prostate cancer with spread to his lower spine.  he was started on hormone pills today and will get injection every 3 months starting in 2 weeks. he will also be getting chemotherapy. 


 


i am just wondering if anyone else here has been in this situation and can help shed some light on whats ahead of us. its the unknown that scares me the most. 


 


thanks 


 


Amy. x 

User
Posted 12 Jan 2019 at 12:56

Hi Amy, sorry to read about your Dad’s diagnosis. It sounds like he is on exactly the right treatment path. The tablets and then the injections will starve the cancer cells of testosterone which fuels their growth. This means the cancer is alteady under attack and shrink.


The early chemotherapy will damage the cells further and help the hormone therapy work for longer.


This was shown to prolong life in the Stampede trial.


They may also consider targeted radiotherapy to the spine mets to help with pain.


There are many men on here with dimilar diagnoses, I'm sure you will get more responses.


Best wishes to you, your Dad and the family.


Ian

User
Posted 12 Jan 2019 at 22:45

Hi Amy,


My profile will give you the info re my situation.


You asked about the chemotherapy unknown being worrying. Below I have posted info from my own experience. This is Copied & Pasted from a message I set to someone else so when you see references to “your dad” don’t get confused as I’m referring to someone else’s dad.


As you already know infection can be an issue so any increase in temperature or feeling unwell should not be ignored. Your dad said you have bought him a thermometer - a great ideal!


My two sons and daughter made up their own chemotherapy survivors kit for me. Not sure I can remember everything that was in it but I’ll try:


Anti-bacterial hand gel, I used that regularly and always carried a bottle with me when out and about. Tended to not go very far at the low white blood cell points though; Queasy Pops - they actually helped with the metallic bitter taste which is very common. I froze fresh pineapple pulp for that as well; Hand and foot moisturiser as skin is prone to drying out. I used the hand cream throughout the day and the foot cream every night. I don’t know if it helped but I certainly never experienced any skin issues. There was also a very thick book “Extreme Fishing” to take to chemotherapy sessions. Cuticle drops for my nails. I had bother with them - all my nails lifted but didn’t detach. Some did get infected though and required an antibiotic. And lastly in the kit was a VR headset because they thought I was going to have to spend a lot of time in bed. I didn’t but the headset was/is a lot of fun.


Going back to the risk of infection - Chris, my wife, and I used to take turns wiping over surfaces, knobs, handles, sinks etc with anti-bacterial wipes once a week or so. Chopping boards and kitchen surfaces were done every time they were used. We used a lot of those and baby wipes 😀


Hair on my head and beard fell out but only thinned and went pure white. I didn’t go bald and according to my nurses nor do most men. There isn’t a lot you can do about that anyway and it grows back afterwards.


Your dad will be given antI-sickness pills throughout treatment. I would suggest he takes them for the first three days or so of each cycle even if he doesn’t feel sick. I was never actually sick but had regular bouts of retching.


Tiredness will almost certainly be an issue for dad at some point with extreme fatigue maybe showing up. With tiredness it’s a good idea to try and remain active to some extent and with the fatigue...he’ll know when he has that. I had a couple of bouts of it and it’s really a case of waiting for it to pass.


Your dad asked me if his life would change due to his treatment. Obviously I can’t know how he will react but even with the things I have told you about I pretty much sailed through it. Life does change during the four months of chemotherapy but my life has got back to normal. And despite the fact that I have cancer is always on my mind life is pretty much perfect. This is mostly due to the love and support of my wife and realising how much I mean to my sons and daughter. I always thought of myself as dad, who would help out whenever I could and drive them nuts with “dad jokes” It’s actually humbling to realise I’m more than that. I’m sure your dad feels the same way with the support you are giving him.


I hope this helps.


Dave

Edited by member 13 Jan 2019 at 10:31  | Reason: Not specified

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User
Posted 12 Jan 2019 at 12:56

Hi Amy, sorry to read about your Dad’s diagnosis. It sounds like he is on exactly the right treatment path. The tablets and then the injections will starve the cancer cells of testosterone which fuels their growth. This means the cancer is alteady under attack and shrink.


The early chemotherapy will damage the cells further and help the hormone therapy work for longer.


This was shown to prolong life in the Stampede trial.


They may also consider targeted radiotherapy to the spine mets to help with pain.


There are many men on here with dimilar diagnoses, I'm sure you will get more responses.


Best wishes to you, your Dad and the family.


Ian

User
Posted 12 Jan 2019 at 14:40

Amy,


Im not on chemo but had a similar dx 4 months ago. If you read my profile it may help you. I think like others have said ,the first few weeks and months are tough until you get a treatment plan under way. Some guys, me included gained a lot of strengh and understanding after that, plus the  info and knowlege from this forum  sometimes helps  to manage this awfull illness.


Chris.

User
Posted 12 Jan 2019 at 16:16

Hi Amy


My husband was diagnosed in march 2018, G7 PSA 26.3 micromets on pelvis. He started Prostap (hormone) then chose to have early chemo. He had 6 sessions over the summer which he tolerated really well. Managed to work (all be it from home) all the way thru. His PSA has been 0.1 since july.  It was a very scary time at the beginning but like everyone says once you start on your treatment it is not a bad as you think.  Husband is back working abroad and life is a new normal.


Any questions please feel free to ask.


Regards Karen

User
Posted 12 Jan 2019 at 17:14

Thabks for all the reply’s. Its the chemo unknown i think is the worst. I have shown dad these response and i think he might get himself set up on here, hes not one for online stuff but i think he see how useful and supportive it could be for him .


 


 


A x 

User
Posted 12 Jan 2019 at 22:45

Hi Amy,


My profile will give you the info re my situation.


You asked about the chemotherapy unknown being worrying. Below I have posted info from my own experience. This is Copied & Pasted from a message I set to someone else so when you see references to “your dad” don’t get confused as I’m referring to someone else’s dad.


As you already know infection can be an issue so any increase in temperature or feeling unwell should not be ignored. Your dad said you have bought him a thermometer - a great ideal!


My two sons and daughter made up their own chemotherapy survivors kit for me. Not sure I can remember everything that was in it but I’ll try:


Anti-bacterial hand gel, I used that regularly and always carried a bottle with me when out and about. Tended to not go very far at the low white blood cell points though; Queasy Pops - they actually helped with the metallic bitter taste which is very common. I froze fresh pineapple pulp for that as well; Hand and foot moisturiser as skin is prone to drying out. I used the hand cream throughout the day and the foot cream every night. I don’t know if it helped but I certainly never experienced any skin issues. There was also a very thick book “Extreme Fishing” to take to chemotherapy sessions. Cuticle drops for my nails. I had bother with them - all my nails lifted but didn’t detach. Some did get infected though and required an antibiotic. And lastly in the kit was a VR headset because they thought I was going to have to spend a lot of time in bed. I didn’t but the headset was/is a lot of fun.


Going back to the risk of infection - Chris, my wife, and I used to take turns wiping over surfaces, knobs, handles, sinks etc with anti-bacterial wipes once a week or so. Chopping boards and kitchen surfaces were done every time they were used. We used a lot of those and baby wipes 😀


Hair on my head and beard fell out but only thinned and went pure white. I didn’t go bald and according to my nurses nor do most men. There isn’t a lot you can do about that anyway and it grows back afterwards.


Your dad will be given antI-sickness pills throughout treatment. I would suggest he takes them for the first three days or so of each cycle even if he doesn’t feel sick. I was never actually sick but had regular bouts of retching.


Tiredness will almost certainly be an issue for dad at some point with extreme fatigue maybe showing up. With tiredness it’s a good idea to try and remain active to some extent and with the fatigue...he’ll know when he has that. I had a couple of bouts of it and it’s really a case of waiting for it to pass.


Your dad asked me if his life would change due to his treatment. Obviously I can’t know how he will react but even with the things I have told you about I pretty much sailed through it. Life does change during the four months of chemotherapy but my life has got back to normal. And despite the fact that I have cancer is always on my mind life is pretty much perfect. This is mostly due to the love and support of my wife and realising how much I mean to my sons and daughter. I always thought of myself as dad, who would help out whenever I could and drive them nuts with “dad jokes” It’s actually humbling to realise I’m more than that. I’m sure your dad feels the same way with the support you are giving him.


I hope this helps.


Dave

Edited by member 13 Jan 2019 at 10:31  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 13 Jan 2019 at 09:40

Thank you for the reply. I think I may invesg in a chemo survial kit. 

User
Posted 13 Jan 2019 at 10:45
The thought of chemotherapy is more scary than it actually is. There are risks involved, mostly because of susceptibility to infection. There is a lot to take at first but I found the actual treatment procedure quite relaxing. The whole process takes several hours but I always had something to read, iPad and music to while away the time. It was also helped by the friendliness, thoughtfulness and kindness of the nurses treating me.

Dave
 
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