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London Marathon 2019

User
Posted 06 Mar 2019 at 11:02

I've got a good-for-age place at the 2019 London Marathon and I was aiming for a sub 3'15 time. BUT cancer recurrence was confirmed yesterday. The oncologist wanted to start radiotherapy as soon as possible but we agreed to wait until a week after the marathon. The problem is he was adamant that I start taking Bicalutamide straight away.

I've always had an aversion to any sort of hormone therapy and thought I would never need it as I thought my RP (April 2015) for locally advanced PC meant I was "cured". I'm really concerned about the side effects particularly in the short term and the effects on my training and racing performance. 

I've read the booklets and I will come to accept the inevitability of side effects on the immediate lead up to and post RT but I need to understand the consequences of starting the tablets today vs delaying until 28th April.

I've twice been Duathlon age-group World Champion and will be striving to be the best that I can be in London. I'm struggling with the idea that a little pill will ruin my ambitions.

Who can help me come to terms with this or comment on the effect it will have on my performance?

PeteW

User
Posted 06 Mar 2019 at 16:11

Hi Pete, you are a better athlete than me however i was diagnosed with T4 prostate cancer 4 years ago and my BC cancer race times will never be seen again. however my AD (after diagnosis) efforts are different and as such i have run further than ever and do my best pb that i can on the day (week)!

tomorrow i start the 6633 arctic ultra , www.6633arcticultra.com which is 383 miles non stop pulling a sledge. i have no idea how long it will take me or even if i will finish. i have been on hormone drugs for 4 years plus chemo and rt and the joy is all about putting my foot on the start line.

my point to you is that the time is not important' its about being alive enough to start to show yourself and others that you can still do amazing things if you dont give up. i know some here are physically unable to get on a running start line but if its your thing and you can then be there and enjoy the journey as the alternative is not a olace i need to be yet,

good luck in the race i wil” be at a cheering station cheering fior you"

kev

Dream like you have forever, live like you only have today Avatar is me doing the 600 mile Camino de Santiago May 2019

User
Posted 09 May 2019 at 18:40

A great achievement. Hope the RT goes smoothly.

Ido4

User
Posted 10 May 2019 at 08:27
Indeed, a great achievement.

Perhaps I should have done my current adventure as a sponsored event. Having walked the London Capital Ring last year I am now walking the London Loop, a 150 mile walk round outer London. Now completed around a third of it, yesterday did the 7 mile leg between Ewell and Kingston. With RT now three years ago and symptoms well under control I am determined to enjoy life while I can. There certainly life after PC.

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User
Posted 06 Mar 2019 at 12:26

Go for the marathon and defer the hormones for six weeks.

It's unlikely to make much difference in the grand scheme of things, and the race is clearly very important to you.

After all, you wouldn't want to be accused of using performance-enhancing drugs 😉

Best of luck anyway.

Cheers, John.

Edited by member 06 Mar 2019 at 14:02  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 06 Mar 2019 at 12:55

See my post in the "Diet and Exercise" thread, but I don't believe 6 months of Bicalutamide made any difference to my fitness, although I won't have been monitoring it as accurately as you probably are.

User
Posted 06 Mar 2019 at 13:20
Thanks John (Bollinge). Hopefully I'll get a few more posts saying the same thing! I'm definitely deferring until after the Bath Half next week. I think denial is the best policy. :-)

User
Posted 06 Mar 2019 at 16:11

Hi Pete, you are a better athlete than me however i was diagnosed with T4 prostate cancer 4 years ago and my BC cancer race times will never be seen again. however my AD (after diagnosis) efforts are different and as such i have run further than ever and do my best pb that i can on the day (week)!

tomorrow i start the 6633 arctic ultra , www.6633arcticultra.com which is 383 miles non stop pulling a sledge. i have no idea how long it will take me or even if i will finish. i have been on hormone drugs for 4 years plus chemo and rt and the joy is all about putting my foot on the start line.

my point to you is that the time is not important' its about being alive enough to start to show yourself and others that you can still do amazing things if you dont give up. i know some here are physically unable to get on a running start line but if its your thing and you can then be there and enjoy the journey as the alternative is not a olace i need to be yet,

good luck in the race i wil” be at a cheering station cheering fior you"

kev

Dream like you have forever, live like you only have today Avatar is me doing the 600 mile Camino de Santiago May 2019

User
Posted 06 Mar 2019 at 16:25
Hi Kev

I've sent you a PM re stage 4 prognosis.

Thanks

John

User
Posted 06 Mar 2019 at 17:14
It depends on your stats - how quickly is your PSA rising and what is it currently?
"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

User
Posted 09 May 2019 at 10:12

Well, I did it! My last good run was on 8 March then on the 10th my back pain got worse and I developed sciatica that stopped my legs working properly. I missed the Bath Half as I could not run even 2 miles the day before it. Tried running several times after but 2 miles at a slow pace was my limit. When it became clear that there was no chance of me being on the start line I started taking the bicalutamide. 

Then two weeks before the marathon, when I got the email asking me to confirm my attendance, I managed a 6 mile run and a couple of days later a slow and uncomfortable 10 miler. As I had prepaid the travel and accommodation and I could not defer again I decided to join the PCUK team on the start line and started a JustGiving page.

With the effects of the HT, the lack of training and continuing back problems I thought that I had no chance of finishing. 

The first 6 miles went quite well but thereafter the back pain slowed my pace. I kept plodding away and to my surprise I went over Tower Bridge and past the half way point. When I got to 19 miles I thought I would be able to finish and even had thoughts of upping the pace in the last 5 miles but soon after my pace suddenly dropped another minute per mile. From then on it was a matter of survival. I crossed the finish line in 3'45'43" with a strange sense of relief and astonishment that despite all my troubles I made it to the finish.

It was great to meet up with the PCUK runners and supporters after the event and to talk other runners and the PCUK staff. So far I have raised about £1200.

I've got a bigger challenge to face now; I started RT yesterday. I'm hoping that I get through it without too much damage and that I can make a comeback to competitive sport next year. 

https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/peter-wheddon1

 

User
Posted 09 May 2019 at 18:40

A great achievement. Hope the RT goes smoothly.

Ido4

User
Posted 10 May 2019 at 08:27
Indeed, a great achievement.

Perhaps I should have done my current adventure as a sponsored event. Having walked the London Capital Ring last year I am now walking the London Loop, a 150 mile walk round outer London. Now completed around a third of it, yesterday did the 7 mile leg between Ewell and Kingston. With RT now three years ago and symptoms well under control I am determined to enjoy life while I can. There certainly life after PC.

User
Posted 10 May 2019 at 11:10
Well done, Pete! I've been on bicalutimide for 8 months now, and completed my RT in March. I didn't find it too bad at all. A bit of bowel upset and, towards the end of treatment, a need to pee very frequently, particularly at night, but the symptoms subsided within a couple of weeks of treatment ending.

Has your oncologist prescribed Tamoxifen to counter the breast-growth side-effect of bicalutimide? If not, I'd suggest asking for it.

Hope your RT goes smoothly.

Best wishes,

Chris

User
Posted 10 May 2019 at 11:50

Thanks Chris. Third session of RT done. Just seven weeks to go! Just been told only 6 months on bicalutamide. Looking forward to getting to the other side. 😀

User
Posted 28 Jun 2019 at 08:15

Originally Posted by: Online Community Member
Indeed, a great achievement.
Perhaps I should have done my current adventure as a sponsored event. Having walked the London Capital Ring last year I am now walking the London Loop, a 150 mile walk round outer London. Now completed around a third of it, yesterday did the 7 mile leg between Ewell and Kingston. With RT now three years ago and symptoms well under control I am determined to enjoy life while I can. There certainly life after PC.

Just as an update, see my report of this week's walk on the London Loop - around 100 miles of the 150 miles done now and still as determined as ever now I have 'cured' this nasty disease:

http://davesergeant.com/loop14.htm

Edited by member 28 Jun 2019 at 08:15  | Reason: Not specified

 
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