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Psa 102 on HT confused

User
Posted 28 Mar 2019 at 10:28

Hi

Dad just told he has pc.  Psa 102. Was started on HT. Then week later bone scan and biopsy.  Bone scan back and it's in neck, spine and pelvis.  Very confused as reading reports that HT is not done before scan and biopsies.  

Don't have a clue what's next and worried out my mind. Any advice ??

User
Posted 28 Mar 2019 at 12:05

I think HT can be started as soon as they know raised PSA is due to PCa (and not, for example, prostatitis). Maybe the 102 level was the trigger for that in this case? I suppose they could even start the HT tablets (such as bicalutamide) before being sure, as a couple of weeks then coming off if they later found it wasn't PCa would be relatively harmless, although I haven't heard of this being done before. You can't easily undo a 3-month HT injection once that's been given, so I think they'd have to be certain before going down that path.

The HT will stop it spreading for now, so he's on the right treatment.

They might decide that's all that's required for the time being, or they might suggest adding early chemo.

Being told you have cancer is always a shock. However, PCa is slow moving and can be stopped for some time with HT, and so doesn't demand the urgent actions that are more familiar with other cancers. Once you are on HT, they have plenty of time to work out the best treatment options, and for you to choose which one is best for you, plan around holidays, etc.

Sorry you've ended up here, but you will get lots of good support and advice.

Edited by member 28 Mar 2019 at 12:08  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 28 Mar 2019 at 12:07
Hi jgw,

Sorry you join us due to your Dad's PCa diagnosis. We don't know his histology but it seems likely that with a PSA of 102 and possibly exhibiting other symptoms, it was thought advisable to get him started on HT to help constrain further spread in his case. It's possible he may be offered Chemo at some stage and some RT to specific areas to reduce pain.

Dad should have regular PSA checks to monitor how effective treatment is as this can vary considerably with PCa.

Barry
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User
Posted 28 Mar 2019 at 12:05

I think HT can be started as soon as they know raised PSA is due to PCa (and not, for example, prostatitis). Maybe the 102 level was the trigger for that in this case? I suppose they could even start the HT tablets (such as bicalutamide) before being sure, as a couple of weeks then coming off if they later found it wasn't PCa would be relatively harmless, although I haven't heard of this being done before. You can't easily undo a 3-month HT injection once that's been given, so I think they'd have to be certain before going down that path.

The HT will stop it spreading for now, so he's on the right treatment.

They might decide that's all that's required for the time being, or they might suggest adding early chemo.

Being told you have cancer is always a shock. However, PCa is slow moving and can be stopped for some time with HT, and so doesn't demand the urgent actions that are more familiar with other cancers. Once you are on HT, they have plenty of time to work out the best treatment options, and for you to choose which one is best for you, plan around holidays, etc.

Sorry you've ended up here, but you will get lots of good support and advice.

Edited by member 28 Mar 2019 at 12:08  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 28 Mar 2019 at 12:07
Hi jgw,

Sorry you join us due to your Dad's PCa diagnosis. We don't know his histology but it seems likely that with a PSA of 102 and possibly exhibiting other symptoms, it was thought advisable to get him started on HT to help constrain further spread in his case. It's possible he may be offered Chemo at some stage and some RT to specific areas to reduce pain.

Dad should have regular PSA checks to monitor how effective treatment is as this can vary considerably with PCa.

Barry
 
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