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Who do I ring at the end?

User
Posted 06 Sep 2019 at 09:58

When my husband dies who do I ring first? He’s filled in the end of life form or whatever it’s called and requested no CPR so I know I don’t ideal 999 but if it’s in the middle of the night say, who do I ring. The GP out of hours goes directly to 111 so do I ring that? TIA 

User
Posted 06 Sep 2019 at 23:15
It depends, Barb. Let's assume that his disease progresses as expected and he wants to remain at home rather than go into a hospice. The palliative care team (probably from your local hospice) will put a package in place and hand responsibility for his care to the GP and district nurses. If he dies in the night and you don't have a night sitter at the time, you phone the out of hours GP number. Once there has been a home visit to confirm death, you call the undertaker. If he died suddenly before he gets to that stage, you ring 999 and they will send an ambulance and probably the police. If he has died, they then tell you to call an undertaker and arrange to have the body moved. If it is classed as a sudden and unexpected death, the ambulance would take him to the hospital mortuary first and then tell you when the undertaker is allowed to collect him.
"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

User
Posted 07 Sep 2019 at 06:51

Hi Barb

Our Doctor has given us a form that the district nurses can sign to certify death at home. So we call them to come out. I was thinking about this last night and wondering about funeral directors, but decided to deal with all that when the time comes.

 I understand your worry, I think you need more support. Has the GP/hospice engaged the district nurse service yet?

love Devonmaid xxx

User
Posted 07 Sep 2019 at 08:17

Remember you will need a death certificate before you call an undertaker. I assume the GP has to issue this.

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User
Posted 06 Sep 2019 at 23:15
It depends, Barb. Let's assume that his disease progresses as expected and he wants to remain at home rather than go into a hospice. The palliative care team (probably from your local hospice) will put a package in place and hand responsibility for his care to the GP and district nurses. If he dies in the night and you don't have a night sitter at the time, you phone the out of hours GP number. Once there has been a home visit to confirm death, you call the undertaker. If he died suddenly before he gets to that stage, you ring 999 and they will send an ambulance and probably the police. If he has died, they then tell you to call an undertaker and arrange to have the body moved. If it is classed as a sudden and unexpected death, the ambulance would take him to the hospital mortuary first and then tell you when the undertaker is allowed to collect him.
"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

User
Posted 07 Sep 2019 at 06:51

Hi Barb

Our Doctor has given us a form that the district nurses can sign to certify death at home. So we call them to come out. I was thinking about this last night and wondering about funeral directors, but decided to deal with all that when the time comes.

 I understand your worry, I think you need more support. Has the GP/hospice engaged the district nurse service yet?

love Devonmaid xxx

User
Posted 07 Sep 2019 at 08:17

Remember you will need a death certificate before you call an undertaker. I assume the GP has to issue this.

User
Posted 08 Sep 2019 at 11:47

Originally Posted by: Online Community Member
It depends, Barb. Let's assume that his disease progresses as expected and he wants to remain at home rather than go into a hospice. The palliative care team (probably from your local hospice) will put a package in place and hand responsibility for his care to the GP and district nurses. If he dies in the night and you don't have a night sitter at the time, you phone the out of hours GP number. Once there has been a home visit to confirm death, you call the undertaker. If he died suddenly before he gets to that stage, you ring 999 and they will send an ambulance and probably the police. If he has died, they then tell you to call an undertaker and arrange to have the body moved. If it is classed as a sudden and unexpected death, the ambulance would take him to the hospital mortuary first and then tell you when the undertaker is allowed to collect him.

He’s been diagnosed for 13 years and has bone mets and Courda Equina as it’s in his spine, pelvis and patches in other areas. We have a palliative package in place so his death won’t be classed as unexpected so no need to ideal 999 

User
Posted 08 Sep 2019 at 12:46

Yes but for the moment, you perhaps don’t have home carers, night sitters, etc coming in and death is not thought to be imminent so you need to clarify with the palliative care team what you would do if it was sudden. My friend’s mum had DNR in place at the hospital but took ill at home and my friend did not call 999 because she thought the DNR applied anywhere. Her mum died before the GP got there and the police arrested my friend for suspected murder / manslaughter for not phoning an ambulance. It took many months before they dropped the charges. So until you have a written instruction not to phone 999, I would still phone them first. When the care plan is being written, the GP will need to say what number they want you to phone if he dies when the surgery is closed (assuming responsibility for his end of life care is handed back to the GP).

Edited by member 08 Sep 2019 at 13:07  | Reason: Not specified

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

 
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