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Running/excercise

User
Posted 27 Oct 2019 at 15:54

Hi folks, I wonder if anyone has any advice on running fitness whilst on hormone therapy treatment. I was diagnosed in March 2018 and for the first six months I was still going at my normal pace doing two 10ks in just over the hour but since I have become increasingly fatigued. I still go out three or four times a week but   now manage run for say one mile then walk for around two hundred yards and so on. I understand the the effects are accumulative but I was thinking if anyone else has any ideas to pass on. Oh I'm seventy next January. Thanks in advance.

User
Posted 27 Oct 2019 at 21:00

Hi Chris, 

Thank you for replying, I know it's probably easy for me to say as my situation is totally different to yours but you can really help yourself to get rid of this horrible illness. Exercise and diet are really important whilst you are going through any form of cancer related therapies. Just try and think positively about this treatment, get used to walking every day for say half an hour for a start, drink at least three litres of water per day etc. Make this period a fresh start for the rest of your life. Hope it goes well mate and never give up. 

 

User
Posted 28 Oct 2019 at 13:34
Best avoided.

Cheers, John.

User
Posted 28 Oct 2019 at 21:22

Hi as Lyne said I still run ultramarathons, I am only 54 but have been on HT for 5 years now.

i push myself hard and most of the time any pain is usually treatment related ie I am not actually injured so I just ignore it and run through it. That does have a downside as sometimes I am actually injured so I have learnt that a sensible training plan stops those injuries. 

The same applies to being tired, I am only tired so I ignore it. The benefits of exercise and a few hours sleep outweigh ( in my opinion) no exercise .

i also have learnt that speed/distance is not important it’s just about going out and feeling alive. I plan something good for tomorrow before I go to bed the night before, that way I avoid dark thoughts and stick to my health plan. I am not perfect and have bad days like everyone but most of the time the thought of some form of exercise is enough.

i also book a race, trek or charity event months in advance so I have something to train for as the triple aim of exercise, fund raising and proving to others anything is possible is good motivation to get me out of bed when it’s wet and cold!

i can only say what works for me but I intend to die living if it’s in my control.

One day maybe I won’t  be able to do stuff but I don’t want to ever look back and say I didn’t push myself when I could have, no regrets and all that.

Enjoy your run tomorrow, I will be enjoying mine, Kev 

Dream like you have forever, live like you only have today Avatar is me doing the 600 mile Camino de Santiago May 2019

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User
Posted 27 Oct 2019 at 19:42
I totally admire you and your stamina at 70. I’m only 52 but due to meds and past work choices etc can’t even run across a road. And I have a 9 year old boy. Sometimes my knees ache so bad I can’t sleep a wink at all. And I’ve not started HT yet but it’s just around the corner with psa over 190. I utterly dread to think of my life when I start on HT and Chemo and not sure whether to even bother ...

If life gives you lemons , then make lemonade

User
Posted 27 Oct 2019 at 21:00

Hi Chris, 

Thank you for replying, I know it's probably easy for me to say as my situation is totally different to yours but you can really help yourself to get rid of this horrible illness. Exercise and diet are really important whilst you are going through any form of cancer related therapies. Just try and think positively about this treatment, get used to walking every day for say half an hour for a start, drink at least three litres of water per day etc. Make this period a fresh start for the rest of your life. Hope it goes well mate and never give up. 

 

User
Posted 27 Oct 2019 at 23:04

Aged 74 only started C25K June, now circa run every other day mostly 5K with occanssily 10K runs and 12+K hikes, so not at your level. Since running hot flushes have returned. However whilst on HT (2004 - 2008) had the not unusual fatigue. Advice was try to keep your energy usage at a constant level even if that means slowing right down to begin with. It worked well and was a base I could build on. Thus perhaps you could slow your pace right down to firstly achieve 5K continuous running and slowly improve pace/distance. Its as though because your body is changing you have to go back to square one.

Good luck

Ray

Edited by member 27 Oct 2019 at 23:06  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 27 Oct 2019 at 23:49
There are a fair few runners, cyclists and other fit guys on here - check out Irun (who competes in ultra-marathons despite advanced cancer with multiple bone mets) as one example. The general advice is to understand how your body has changed with the loss of testosterone and adjust your training / activity to suit - if you need to walk episodically, so be it. Some find they are not so affected by the loss of muscle but the loosening ligaments mean increased joint pain - for others it is the breathlessness that is hardest to overcome.

PCUK did some research on managing fatigue during HT a couple of years ago; you could give the nurses a ring (number at the top of this page) to talk through.

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

User
Posted 28 Oct 2019 at 07:05

Ray, 

        Thank you, that sounds like a good plan, all the best. 

  John 

User
Posted 28 Oct 2019 at 07:07

Lyne, 

Thank you very much, sound advice again. 

User
Posted 28 Oct 2019 at 12:32
An after thought have you tried healthunlocked C25K forum.. Different forums (click on block of 9 dots next to home icon) C25K, Bridge 5 - 10K, HM, Marathon. Longstanding very helpful folks who might offer further advice.

https://healthunlocked.com/couchto5k

I'm member 'Skeg' on there.

Ray

User
Posted 28 Oct 2019 at 13:34
Best avoided.

Cheers, John.

User
Posted 28 Oct 2019 at 21:22

Hi as Lyne said I still run ultramarathons, I am only 54 but have been on HT for 5 years now.

i push myself hard and most of the time any pain is usually treatment related ie I am not actually injured so I just ignore it and run through it. That does have a downside as sometimes I am actually injured so I have learnt that a sensible training plan stops those injuries. 

The same applies to being tired, I am only tired so I ignore it. The benefits of exercise and a few hours sleep outweigh ( in my opinion) no exercise .

i also have learnt that speed/distance is not important it’s just about going out and feeling alive. I plan something good for tomorrow before I go to bed the night before, that way I avoid dark thoughts and stick to my health plan. I am not perfect and have bad days like everyone but most of the time the thought of some form of exercise is enough.

i also book a race, trek or charity event months in advance so I have something to train for as the triple aim of exercise, fund raising and proving to others anything is possible is good motivation to get me out of bed when it’s wet and cold!

i can only say what works for me but I intend to die living if it’s in my control.

One day maybe I won’t  be able to do stuff but I don’t want to ever look back and say I didn’t push myself when I could have, no regrets and all that.

Enjoy your run tomorrow, I will be enjoying mine, Kev 

Dream like you have forever, live like you only have today Avatar is me doing the 600 mile Camino de Santiago May 2019

User
Posted 29 Oct 2019 at 15:57
Thanks for the info, will try different methods me thinks, then chose one that suits. Thank again.
User
Posted 03 Nov 2019 at 10:02

I’m another runner who was diagnosed stage 4 with widespread bone mets in May 2017. In fact I was training for an ultra marathon when I was diagnosed aged 60 and went from ultra training to terminally ill in 36 hours. Like @Irun I still run but I’ve been affected quite adversely by treatment side effects, particularly fatigue. I try to run 3 to 4 timers per week and do one strength training session but it ain’t easy. You can read more of my story at www.justgiving.com/970miles4men 

 
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