I'm interested in conversations about and I want to talk about
Know exactly what you want?
Show search

Notification

Error

Managing hair loss

User
Posted 29 Dec 2019 at 20:49

My second cycle of docetaxel starts tomorrow, meanwhile I’ve been experiencing the beginning of hair loss over recent days. 

Rather messy, so I’m wondering how to deal with it. 

So far:

a) it’s occurred to me to buy a hair net for nighttime use. Anyone done that?

An old cotton hat might be an alternative.

b) I’ve noticed it’s worse when wearing the warmer fabric pyjamas , so reverting to lightweight ‘old fashioned’ (I’m told!) pyjamas should help (less static).

c) As for going out and about later, I haven’t thought about that as yet, but presumably some kind of hat might be useful during the colder months.

All suggestions welcome!

 

 

 

 

User
Posted 29 Dec 2019 at 23:52

Sorry to read that, and must admit I've not previously seen any posts about that so thought it didn't happen with prostate cancer drugs.  

I have thought if it happened to me I'd cut my hair very short. Although it is already short and there isn't much of it. Perhaps you have a lot of hair.   

I always ask for a 4 cut in winter and a 2 in summer, £5.

Also I'd wear a cap or a woolly hat almost all the time.  Also for me that wouldn't be much of a change as I often go into cafes and pubs and don't take my hat off which is usually a woolly one in winter and a baseball cap in summer.  I don't even think about it if that seems strange.

I never used to wear a hat come rain or sun but unfortunately that caused two skin cancers which needed grafts on my head.  I soon got used to wearing one as the doctor made it clear that I'd baked my head to the limit.

Perhaps someone will suggest something else.  All the best, Peter

User
Posted 30 Dec 2019 at 09:03
Stan had his head shaved as soon as the hair started falling out; not shaved with a razor (risk of infection) but a number 2 or maybe a 1.

A hat is important but try to buy only natural fabrics. I have bought bamboo hats as gifts for a number of friends going through chemo; they are the kindest to your skin but don’t always look great so perhaps more for in the house than out and about.

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

User
Posted 30 Dec 2019 at 10:33
You can buy an electric hair trimmer for the price of a couple of haircuts.

This time of year, and while having chemo, you'll want to wear a beany over it, but by the time that's done with, you'll be an expert and happy to appear as Kojak / Yul Brynner wherever you go.

It's not even controversial, these days!

.

-- Andrew --

"I intend to live forever, or die trying" - Groucho Marx

User
Posted 30 Dec 2019 at 11:46
Have you considered asking for and using a cold cap during your chemo session.

I did for all 6 sessions and lost some hair after the first but then managed to keep what was left. It's uncomfortable at first but you get used to the feeling after about 20 minutes. The sensation as your scalp is cooling is often described as 'the worst ice creme head ever!!'

It will add 30 minutes to your cycle at the beginning as it lowers your scalp temp down to 6-8 degC and an hour at the end whilst your body processes the Doxcetaxal.

It worked really well for me but the scariest thing was when my hair started growing again it became curly but thankfully that went after a couple of cuts and now back to normal but with more on top than I started with. Joy!!

All the best

Andy

User
Posted 30 Dec 2019 at 14:04

HT can halt, and even reverse balding.

I didn't have chemo, but I had RT. I thought my pubes had survived RT, but 2 weeks afterwards, they fell out. Wasn't sure if I'd get them back given I'm on HT too, but they have regrown straighter and darker than they were, which was a bit of a surprise.

Edited by member 30 Dec 2019 at 14:11  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 30 Dec 2019 at 18:00

My oh has lost some hair after his second chemotherapy treatment but it looks thinner. He will see how it goes and shave it shorter if the loss becomes excessive. Woolly hats or caps should disguise it if necessary.

Show Most Thanked Posts
User
Posted 29 Dec 2019 at 23:52

Sorry to read that, and must admit I've not previously seen any posts about that so thought it didn't happen with prostate cancer drugs.  

I have thought if it happened to me I'd cut my hair very short. Although it is already short and there isn't much of it. Perhaps you have a lot of hair.   

I always ask for a 4 cut in winter and a 2 in summer, £5.

Also I'd wear a cap or a woolly hat almost all the time.  Also for me that wouldn't be much of a change as I often go into cafes and pubs and don't take my hat off which is usually a woolly one in winter and a baseball cap in summer.  I don't even think about it if that seems strange.

I never used to wear a hat come rain or sun but unfortunately that caused two skin cancers which needed grafts on my head.  I soon got used to wearing one as the doctor made it clear that I'd baked my head to the limit.

Perhaps someone will suggest something else.  All the best, Peter

User
Posted 30 Dec 2019 at 09:03
Stan had his head shaved as soon as the hair started falling out; not shaved with a razor (risk of infection) but a number 2 or maybe a 1.

A hat is important but try to buy only natural fabrics. I have bought bamboo hats as gifts for a number of friends going through chemo; they are the kindest to your skin but don’t always look great so perhaps more for in the house than out and about.

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

User
Posted 30 Dec 2019 at 10:33
You can buy an electric hair trimmer for the price of a couple of haircuts.

This time of year, and while having chemo, you'll want to wear a beany over it, but by the time that's done with, you'll be an expert and happy to appear as Kojak / Yul Brynner wherever you go.

It's not even controversial, these days!

.

-- Andrew --

"I intend to live forever, or die trying" - Groucho Marx

User
Posted 30 Dec 2019 at 11:46
Have you considered asking for and using a cold cap during your chemo session.

I did for all 6 sessions and lost some hair after the first but then managed to keep what was left. It's uncomfortable at first but you get used to the feeling after about 20 minutes. The sensation as your scalp is cooling is often described as 'the worst ice creme head ever!!'

It will add 30 minutes to your cycle at the beginning as it lowers your scalp temp down to 6-8 degC and an hour at the end whilst your body processes the Doxcetaxal.

It worked really well for me but the scariest thing was when my hair started growing again it became curly but thankfully that went after a couple of cuts and now back to normal but with more on top than I started with. Joy!!

All the best

Andy

User
Posted 30 Dec 2019 at 14:04

HT can halt, and even reverse balding.

I didn't have chemo, but I had RT. I thought my pubes had survived RT, but 2 weeks afterwards, they fell out. Wasn't sure if I'd get them back given I'm on HT too, but they have regrown straighter and darker than they were, which was a bit of a surprise.

Edited by member 30 Dec 2019 at 14:11  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 30 Dec 2019 at 18:00

My oh has lost some hair after his second chemotherapy treatment but it looks thinner. He will see how it goes and shave it shorter if the loss becomes excessive. Woolly hats or caps should disguise it if necessary.

 
Forum Jump  
©2020 Prostate Cancer UK