I'm interested in conversations about and I want to talk about
Know exactly what you want?
Show search

Notification

Error

Deleted

User
Posted 30 Dec 2019 at 13:09

 


 


 


 

Edited by member 01 Jan 2020 at 12:25  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 31 Dec 2019 at 20:58

Must admit the fatigue is one of my biggest worries.  I go back Wednesday next week (8th) to "choose" my treatment path, but as the surgical team has already said they do not think that's an advisable option for me I'm going for HT/RT.  I live a solitary life so have to do everything for myself - shopping, cooking, laundry etc.  Plus I have an energetic Jack Russell that needs two good walks each day!  Hope your hubby comes out the other side ok.  Nothing associated with this illness is ever easy it seems.  All the best

User
Posted 30 Dec 2019 at 17:53

Jane


i had a prostatectomy, radiotherapy and hormone therapy.  I’ve been off treatment now since August.  Fatigue is a major issue for me.  I’m not at all surprised to read about how Jonathan is feeling.  PCUK does have a fatigue service - speak to the specialist nurses about it.


Ulsterman

User
Posted 30 Dec 2019 at 18:17
I had RT/HT as primary treatment, Zoladex for 3 yrs (finished June 18) treatment included planned 2 yrs with abiraterone, enzalutimide and prednisone on trial. I 'suffered' from fatigue tried to carry on with some exercise but struggled really. I would say it's perfectly normal to be so tired in the circumstances. Although I finished Zoladex a while ago now I still complain of being too tired but could be that way up to 2 yrs post HT. The HT/RT has done its job up to now anyway.
Peter
User
Posted 30 Dec 2019 at 18:24

Jane,
At the moment, he's in a double whammy of causes of tiredness.


HT causes tiredness, and the workaround for that is exercise. Indeed, exercise makes a big positive difference to many of the side effects. Many local prostate cancer support groups run weekly gym exercise classes cheaply or for free, and you should see if you can hook up with that.


The RT also causes tiredness because it will be lowering the red blood cell count (I lost 8% in 23 RT sessions, it will be more for someone on a full 6 week treatment). This will also make him feel tired, adding on top of the HT tiredness. This red blood cell count will take about a month to recover after the RT finishes, and until then, it's probably better to avoid any strenuous exercise, but some leisurely walking should be in order.

User
Posted 30 Dec 2019 at 21:07
I experienced major fatigue during my RT in Feb/Mar this year, so I’d say it’s a pretty common side-effect. As Lyn says, it can be a heck of a lot more than feeling a bit tired! In my case it went away within a few weeks of finishing the RT. HT can also cause fatigue. Ever since I’ve been on my HT (I started in August 2018) I’m generally in bed by 10pm and out like a light. My energy levels are way, way down on what they were before I started HT - I used to do 10-12 mile walks with my local Ramblers group and think nothing of it. These days the most I can manage is about 4-5 miles.

Best wishes,

Chris
User
Posted 31 Dec 2019 at 21:10

I live on my own too, Stephen, and got through RT just fine. It’s generally not a treatment regime that requires that one be “looked after”. Take it easy and I’m sure you’ll be absolutely fine. The worst thing about it for me, to be honest, was the tedium of the 90-mile round trip to the hospital Monday to Friday for six weeks. That rapidly got VERY boring indeed. The actual treatment, though, was no big deal.


Best wishes,


Chris

Edited by member 31 Dec 2019 at 21:10  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 31 Dec 2019 at 21:27
Thanks, and very best wishes for your treatment. Generally people are on HT for either 3 or 6 months prior to RT, so it’ll probably be a while yet before you have your RT.

Cheers,

Chris
User
Posted 31 Dec 2019 at 21:43

Bean,
Not everyone gets severe fatigue - actually, I don't personally know any people on HT who have it. The biggest way to avoid fatigue on HT is exercise, and it sounds like you are already doing that with your dog walks, although you might think how you can step it up - the more, the better. Exercise combats many of the HT side effects.


You will get more tired towards the end of the RT, and this is probably due to a reduction in red blood cells (although there has been no research as to the cause). Again, if you are fit, the effect is lessened (I still rode my bicycle), but you probably can't plough on through that with high levels of exercise, and might have to slow down a bit, until your body replenishes the red blood cells (about a month).

User
Posted 31 Dec 2019 at 22:36

Originally Posted by: Online Community Member
I'll be having 37 fractions so I can well imagine the journey will become tedious. Thinking of getting some audio books on CD to listen to on the way.


You should start doing your pelvic floor exercises now, but I continued during the car journeys. It helps with continence in the latter half of your treatment and for a few weeks afterwards.


The journey just became routine (although I only had 23 sessions plus some other visits). I found I enjoyed the visits to the hospital - got to know some other wonderful patients in the RT waiting rooms, and the conversations in there are out of this world. The staff were delightful. There was a nice Macmillan cancer centre I went to sit in for 30-40 mins afterwards to let all the water through before I went home. I really missed it when it finished, as do many people!

User
Posted 01 Jan 2020 at 12:13
Significant complications during prostate RT are uncommon, Jane. The vast majority of men get through it with nothing worse than a bit of diahhrea and perhaps bladder irritation. It’s a relatively gentle form of treatment.

Best wishes,

Chris

Show Most Thanked Posts
User
Posted 30 Dec 2019 at 17:53

Jane


i had a prostatectomy, radiotherapy and hormone therapy.  I’ve been off treatment now since August.  Fatigue is a major issue for me.  I’m not at all surprised to read about how Jonathan is feeling.  PCUK does have a fatigue service - speak to the specialist nurses about it.


Ulsterman

User
Posted 30 Dec 2019 at 18:17
I had RT/HT as primary treatment, Zoladex for 3 yrs (finished June 18) treatment included planned 2 yrs with abiraterone, enzalutimide and prednisone on trial. I 'suffered' from fatigue tried to carry on with some exercise but struggled really. I would say it's perfectly normal to be so tired in the circumstances. Although I finished Zoladex a while ago now I still complain of being too tired but could be that way up to 2 yrs post HT. The HT/RT has done its job up to now anyway.
Peter
User
Posted 30 Dec 2019 at 18:24

Jane,
At the moment, he's in a double whammy of causes of tiredness.


HT causes tiredness, and the workaround for that is exercise. Indeed, exercise makes a big positive difference to many of the side effects. Many local prostate cancer support groups run weekly gym exercise classes cheaply or for free, and you should see if you can hook up with that.


The RT also causes tiredness because it will be lowering the red blood cell count (I lost 8% in 23 RT sessions, it will be more for someone on a full 6 week treatment). This will also make him feel tired, adding on top of the HT tiredness. This red blood cell count will take about a month to recover after the RT finishes, and until then, it's probably better to avoid any strenuous exercise, but some leisurely walking should be in order.

User
Posted 30 Dec 2019 at 21:07
I experienced major fatigue during my RT in Feb/Mar this year, so I’d say it’s a pretty common side-effect. As Lyn says, it can be a heck of a lot more than feeling a bit tired! In my case it went away within a few weeks of finishing the RT. HT can also cause fatigue. Ever since I’ve been on my HT (I started in August 2018) I’m generally in bed by 10pm and out like a light. My energy levels are way, way down on what they were before I started HT - I used to do 10-12 mile walks with my local Ramblers group and think nothing of it. These days the most I can manage is about 4-5 miles.

Best wishes,

Chris
User
Posted 31 Dec 2019 at 20:58

Must admit the fatigue is one of my biggest worries.  I go back Wednesday next week (8th) to "choose" my treatment path, but as the surgical team has already said they do not think that's an advisable option for me I'm going for HT/RT.  I live a solitary life so have to do everything for myself - shopping, cooking, laundry etc.  Plus I have an energetic Jack Russell that needs two good walks each day!  Hope your hubby comes out the other side ok.  Nothing associated with this illness is ever easy it seems.  All the best

User
Posted 31 Dec 2019 at 21:10

I live on my own too, Stephen, and got through RT just fine. It’s generally not a treatment regime that requires that one be “looked after”. Take it easy and I’m sure you’ll be absolutely fine. The worst thing about it for me, to be honest, was the tedium of the 90-mile round trip to the hospital Monday to Friday for six weeks. That rapidly got VERY boring indeed. The actual treatment, though, was no big deal.


Best wishes,


Chris

Edited by member 31 Dec 2019 at 21:10  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 31 Dec 2019 at 21:20

Thanks Chris, that's reassuring.  I'll be having 37 fractions so I can well imagine the journey will become tedious.  Thinking of getting some audio books on CD to listen to on the way.  Stupid as it may sound I also worry about my dog, Ziggy.  I'm retired and we've been together 24/7 for nearly eight years.  He's going to find it all a bit strange me disappearing every day.   Still, it's only for a couple of months, which is nothing in relative terms for both of us.  All the best for 2020.

User
Posted 31 Dec 2019 at 21:27
Thanks, and very best wishes for your treatment. Generally people are on HT for either 3 or 6 months prior to RT, so it’ll probably be a while yet before you have your RT.

Cheers,

Chris
User
Posted 31 Dec 2019 at 21:43

Bean,
Not everyone gets severe fatigue - actually, I don't personally know any people on HT who have it. The biggest way to avoid fatigue on HT is exercise, and it sounds like you are already doing that with your dog walks, although you might think how you can step it up - the more, the better. Exercise combats many of the HT side effects.


You will get more tired towards the end of the RT, and this is probably due to a reduction in red blood cells (although there has been no research as to the cause). Again, if you are fit, the effect is lessened (I still rode my bicycle), but you probably can't plough on through that with high levels of exercise, and might have to slow down a bit, until your body replenishes the red blood cells (about a month).

User
Posted 31 Dec 2019 at 21:53

Cheers Andy.  Although I walk several miles a day with the dog there's no escaping the fact I'm 64, overweight, and have an alcohol dependency problem.  The very reasons why I'm being steered away from surgery.  That, plus my longstanding borderline hypertension.  But those are my personal demons to deal with.  Just to say I find your reply, and that from Chris, reassuring.  I'll report back elsewhere about my journey as I don't want to hijack this thread which is about someone else's problems.  Take care and all the best mate 👍

User
Posted 31 Dec 2019 at 22:36

Originally Posted by: Online Community Member
I'll be having 37 fractions so I can well imagine the journey will become tedious. Thinking of getting some audio books on CD to listen to on the way.


You should start doing your pelvic floor exercises now, but I continued during the car journeys. It helps with continence in the latter half of your treatment and for a few weeks afterwards.


The journey just became routine (although I only had 23 sessions plus some other visits). I found I enjoyed the visits to the hospital - got to know some other wonderful patients in the RT waiting rooms, and the conversations in there are out of this world. The staff were delightful. There was a nice Macmillan cancer centre I went to sit in for 30-40 mins afterwards to let all the water through before I went home. I really missed it when it finished, as do many people!

User
Posted 01 Jan 2020 at 12:13
Significant complications during prostate RT are uncommon, Jane. The vast majority of men get through it with nothing worse than a bit of diahhrea and perhaps bladder irritation. It’s a relatively gentle form of treatment.

Best wishes,

Chris

User
Posted 01 Jan 2020 at 13:12
Jane, I have deleted my replies to you, as could the other members. You can delete all your own posts except the first one - to get the thread deleted, email the moderators at onlinecommunity@prostatecanceruk.org because they won’t necessarily see your request here.

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard
User
Posted 01 Jan 2020 at 13:59
I hope that Jonathan feels better soon, Jane. Hopefully the fatigue should start easing once the RT is out of the way. The last couple of weeks of it are always the worst.

Best wishes to you both,

Chris
User
Posted 02 Jan 2020 at 01:55
?
Barry
 
Forum Jump  
©2022 Prostate Cancer UK