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underwear for catheter

User
Posted 24 Jan 2020 at 12:16

RP scheduled for Monday.
I should be sent back home on Tuesday with a catheter which will remain in place for 2 weeks.

A stupid question. But what kind of underwear (if any) works best with catheters?

User
Posted 25 Jan 2020 at 09:58

Hi Amnon,

Hopefull you'll have the opportunity to practice bag emptying drills during your hospital stay, perhaps with your other half. I found this invaluable as bending down was difficult in the first few days.

For a heads up, the following site has a video guide and downloadable PDF for the UGO products:

https://optimummedical.co.uk/product/ugo-leg-bags/?gclid=EAIaIQobChMI9aqUnrme5wIVwrTtCh3kLwC5EAAYAiAAEgJ2lfD_BwE

Pretty straightforward as connectors are push fit (but tight). Don't lose the bottom coupling of the leg bag though as it's needed to connect to the night bag.

As far as pants go, I found it more comfortable to go commando while the kids were out of the house.

Hope this helps.

Kev.

User
Posted 25 Jan 2020 at 10:58

Amnon

Re PJs, put you PJs on before attaching the night bag pull the leg up and the attach the night bag. Having the tube down the leg will help stop tangles. Depending on the leg bag tube length the leg bag spout could be anywhere from your knee to your ankle. Good point about bending. The spout should not come off the leg bag. I did not get the home set up until an hour or so before discharge so no chance to practice. Instilagel is about £2 for a small syringe, from most chemists, hospital may provide it. If you are sore when you come round ask for instilagel, the nurse will squirt a good dose down the penis, not as bad as it sounds. To keep your shoes and socks dry put something round the tap to avoid accidentally opening the tap an elastic band or cut down velcro bag strap. 

First time with a catheter can be daunting and you will be naturally cautious, but they are robust. Accidentally pulling the catheter will get your attention. 

Empty your leg bag when it around half full. Night bags normally hold 2 litres so at night your leg bag is normally empty.

Don't get constipation passing a hard motion past you newly stitched urethra is not the best thing to do.

Thanks Chris

Edited by member 25 Jan 2020 at 11:00  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 25 Jan 2020 at 11:16

My husband has had his catheter for 2 nights and has decided commando for the night bag works best for him.

in the day his usual ‘trunk’ style shorts are proving ideal.

Regards

Clare

 

User
Posted 24 Jan 2020 at 17:53
Something comfortable and supportive, I used trunk type a size larger than I normally take, which worked well, kept everything in it's place while keeping the catheter where it was comfortable and unable to get pulled?? Probably not allowed to say, but I used Next A Fronts.

Good luck, hope all goes well for you.

User
Posted 24 Jan 2020 at 18:01

I've had one in past couple of days, normally wear the stretchy boxer type so just stuck with them, good support and keeps things in place. 

User
Posted 24 Jan 2020 at 18:55

I found boxer shorts and joggers most comfortable , had Cather in for 3wks 

User
Posted 24 Jan 2020 at 19:54
Not boxer shorts as they are loose and will let everything flap around, including the catheter tube. I think colleagues above mean trunks rather than boxers?

Trunks or Y fronts are important because they tend to be close fitting. You will, in effect, have a vasectomy as part of the RP and your penis and scrotum may become very swollen so you will need good support. Buy pants one size larger than you usually wear. The more still the catheter tube is, the less it will rub the eye of your penis.

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

User
Posted 24 Jan 2020 at 20:38

I found putting underwear on/off was more painful to the surrounding areas, therefore I just wore joggers whilst the catheter was in. You will get to know what's comfortable fairly soon after the op.

Good luck with your recovery!

User
Posted 24 Jan 2020 at 23:38
From my own personal experience (only last month) I wore Y fronts, as they offered more support and close fitting. Note, I normally wear trunks, but found that put the catheter tube coming down my leg at a slightly uncomfortable angle, as I was issued with a shorter tube catheter, the bag of which was fitted above the knee as opposed to the longer tubed that can have the bag strapped well below the knee. My advice is have available the options of style, then see what suits you best. I bought a pack of cheap Y fronts from Matalan, but Primark or Asda etc. will also do really cheap underwear that you can trial during recovery. Good luck!
User
Posted 25 Jan 2020 at 07:30

Amnon 

As already said snug but not tight fitting trunk type underwear. Hospitals will frequently give you what they have. If you can get a couple of different tube lengths then great. Make sure you get some instilagel or hydrocaine for the eye of the penis. Some hospitals are now fitting patients with a statlock adhesive thigh catheter fixation device instead of thigh straps or G straps.

If you get thigh straps get a couple of spare ones. Useful for showering, drain the leg bag remove all straps except the thigh strap, shower, dry and then put a dry strap on the other leg and transfer the catheter to the dry strap. Put the wet strap to dry for the next shower. If you have a statlock , drain the bag make sure the statlock is supporting the catheter, remove the leg straps, shower, dry and then refit the straps. The statlock will last at least seven days and should be changed as recommended, normally 5-7 days. Uri sleeves are also good for supporting the leg bag in conjunction with a bag strap. At night attach the night bag to the drain spout of the leg bag, I use a thigh strap around me ankle to secure the night bag tube. The night bag should be supported and not left on the floor, a stand inside a bowl or bucket is a good idea in unlikely event of a leak. Change the bags as recommended by your team,  normally 5-7 days. Do not disconnect and reconnect the leg bag unless you are changing it, any item disconnected should be replaced with new, except for drain able night bags that can be reused for 7 days in the home environment. You may have to fit a new leg bag after 5-7 days, make sure the bag to catheter connection is tight after it is changed, then recheck it after a few hours. Nothing worse than waking up in a wet bed.

All the daily catheter connections etc are best carried out by your OH while you my back and watch. Make sure taps are opened and more importantly closed in the right sequence.

You may get bypassing where urine and blood come out between the catheter and the eye of the penis, can be uncomfortable but quite common. I was always told Rosé colour urine I'd okay Red wine colour needs checking out.

Make the most of no night time visits to the toilet.

Hope all goes well.

Thanks Chris.

 

Edited by member 25 Jan 2020 at 07:35  | Reason: Spelling

User
Posted 25 Jan 2020 at 08:57

Originally Posted by: Online Community Member
Thanks very much Chris,

Dealing with a catheter for two weeks is daunting - especially as I have never even seen a catheter.
There are various instructions for caring for a catheter in the various hospital hand-outs. But no diagrams!
Are there any useful resouces on-line? All I could find was the Austrialian site https://healthywa.wa.gov.au/Articles/A_E/Caring-for-your-catheter

A related question - for the night catheter - will I need to cut a hole in my pyjamma bottoms to let the pipe out?

instilagel or hydrocaine: will the hospital give me a tube, or should I buy it from the chemist ahead of time?

(My hospital is UCLH)

Ones I got from Preston hospital, the night bag attaches to the valve of the leg bag down at the ankle, you'll maybe get the same so no need for holes cutting. 

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User
Posted 24 Jan 2020 at 17:53
Something comfortable and supportive, I used trunk type a size larger than I normally take, which worked well, kept everything in it's place while keeping the catheter where it was comfortable and unable to get pulled?? Probably not allowed to say, but I used Next A Fronts.

Good luck, hope all goes well for you.

User
Posted 24 Jan 2020 at 18:01

I've had one in past couple of days, normally wear the stretchy boxer type so just stuck with them, good support and keeps things in place. 

User
Posted 24 Jan 2020 at 18:55

I found boxer shorts and joggers most comfortable , had Cather in for 3wks 

User
Posted 24 Jan 2020 at 19:54
Not boxer shorts as they are loose and will let everything flap around, including the catheter tube. I think colleagues above mean trunks rather than boxers?

Trunks or Y fronts are important because they tend to be close fitting. You will, in effect, have a vasectomy as part of the RP and your penis and scrotum may become very swollen so you will need good support. Buy pants one size larger than you usually wear. The more still the catheter tube is, the less it will rub the eye of your penis.

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

User
Posted 24 Jan 2020 at 20:38

I found putting underwear on/off was more painful to the surrounding areas, therefore I just wore joggers whilst the catheter was in. You will get to know what's comfortable fairly soon after the op.

Good luck with your recovery!

User
Posted 24 Jan 2020 at 23:38
From my own personal experience (only last month) I wore Y fronts, as they offered more support and close fitting. Note, I normally wear trunks, but found that put the catheter tube coming down my leg at a slightly uncomfortable angle, as I was issued with a shorter tube catheter, the bag of which was fitted above the knee as opposed to the longer tubed that can have the bag strapped well below the knee. My advice is have available the options of style, then see what suits you best. I bought a pack of cheap Y fronts from Matalan, but Primark or Asda etc. will also do really cheap underwear that you can trial during recovery. Good luck!
User
Posted 25 Jan 2020 at 07:30

Amnon 

As already said snug but not tight fitting trunk type underwear. Hospitals will frequently give you what they have. If you can get a couple of different tube lengths then great. Make sure you get some instilagel or hydrocaine for the eye of the penis. Some hospitals are now fitting patients with a statlock adhesive thigh catheter fixation device instead of thigh straps or G straps.

If you get thigh straps get a couple of spare ones. Useful for showering, drain the leg bag remove all straps except the thigh strap, shower, dry and then put a dry strap on the other leg and transfer the catheter to the dry strap. Put the wet strap to dry for the next shower. If you have a statlock , drain the bag make sure the statlock is supporting the catheter, remove the leg straps, shower, dry and then refit the straps. The statlock will last at least seven days and should be changed as recommended, normally 5-7 days. Uri sleeves are also good for supporting the leg bag in conjunction with a bag strap. At night attach the night bag to the drain spout of the leg bag, I use a thigh strap around me ankle to secure the night bag tube. The night bag should be supported and not left on the floor, a stand inside a bowl or bucket is a good idea in unlikely event of a leak. Change the bags as recommended by your team,  normally 5-7 days. Do not disconnect and reconnect the leg bag unless you are changing it, any item disconnected should be replaced with new, except for drain able night bags that can be reused for 7 days in the home environment. You may have to fit a new leg bag after 5-7 days, make sure the bag to catheter connection is tight after it is changed, then recheck it after a few hours. Nothing worse than waking up in a wet bed.

All the daily catheter connections etc are best carried out by your OH while you my back and watch. Make sure taps are opened and more importantly closed in the right sequence.

You may get bypassing where urine and blood come out between the catheter and the eye of the penis, can be uncomfortable but quite common. I was always told Rosé colour urine I'd okay Red wine colour needs checking out.

Make the most of no night time visits to the toilet.

Hope all goes well.

Thanks Chris.

 

Edited by member 25 Jan 2020 at 07:35  | Reason: Spelling

User
Posted 25 Jan 2020 at 07:57
Thanks very much Chris,

Dealing with a catheter for two weeks is daunting - especially as I have never even seen a catheter.

There are various instructions for caring for a catheter in the various hospital hand-outs. But no diagrams!

Are there any useful resouces on-line? All I could find was the Austrialian site https://healthywa.wa.gov.au/Articles/A_E/Caring-for-your-catheter

A related question - for the night catheter - will I need to cut a hole in my pyjamma bottoms to let the pipe out?

instilagel or hydrocaine: will the hospital give me a tube, or should I buy it from the chemist ahead of time?

(My hospital is UCLH)

User
Posted 25 Jan 2020 at 08:57

Originally Posted by: Online Community Member
Thanks very much Chris,

Dealing with a catheter for two weeks is daunting - especially as I have never even seen a catheter.
There are various instructions for caring for a catheter in the various hospital hand-outs. But no diagrams!
Are there any useful resouces on-line? All I could find was the Austrialian site https://healthywa.wa.gov.au/Articles/A_E/Caring-for-your-catheter

A related question - for the night catheter - will I need to cut a hole in my pyjamma bottoms to let the pipe out?

instilagel or hydrocaine: will the hospital give me a tube, or should I buy it from the chemist ahead of time?

(My hospital is UCLH)

Ones I got from Preston hospital, the night bag attaches to the valve of the leg bag down at the ankle, you'll maybe get the same so no need for holes cutting. 

User
Posted 25 Jan 2020 at 09:58

Hi Amnon,

Hopefull you'll have the opportunity to practice bag emptying drills during your hospital stay, perhaps with your other half. I found this invaluable as bending down was difficult in the first few days.

For a heads up, the following site has a video guide and downloadable PDF for the UGO products:

https://optimummedical.co.uk/product/ugo-leg-bags/?gclid=EAIaIQobChMI9aqUnrme5wIVwrTtCh3kLwC5EAAYAiAAEgJ2lfD_BwE

Pretty straightforward as connectors are push fit (but tight). Don't lose the bottom coupling of the leg bag though as it's needed to connect to the night bag.

As far as pants go, I found it more comfortable to go commando while the kids were out of the house.

Hope this helps.

Kev.

User
Posted 25 Jan 2020 at 10:58

Amnon

Re PJs, put you PJs on before attaching the night bag pull the leg up and the attach the night bag. Having the tube down the leg will help stop tangles. Depending on the leg bag tube length the leg bag spout could be anywhere from your knee to your ankle. Good point about bending. The spout should not come off the leg bag. I did not get the home set up until an hour or so before discharge so no chance to practice. Instilagel is about £2 for a small syringe, from most chemists, hospital may provide it. If you are sore when you come round ask for instilagel, the nurse will squirt a good dose down the penis, not as bad as it sounds. To keep your shoes and socks dry put something round the tap to avoid accidentally opening the tap an elastic band or cut down velcro bag strap. 

First time with a catheter can be daunting and you will be naturally cautious, but they are robust. Accidentally pulling the catheter will get your attention. 

Empty your leg bag when it around half full. Night bags normally hold 2 litres so at night your leg bag is normally empty.

Don't get constipation passing a hard motion past you newly stitched urethra is not the best thing to do.

Thanks Chris

Edited by member 25 Jan 2020 at 11:00  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 25 Jan 2020 at 11:16

My husband has had his catheter for 2 nights and has decided commando for the night bag works best for him.

in the day his usual ‘trunk’ style shorts are proving ideal.

Regards

Clare

 

User
Posted 18 Feb 2020 at 14:01
Not had my RARP yet, but have a fair amount of experience with Catheters, because it seems that GA makes my bladder seize up. Over the last two years I've had a Melanoma removed, a follow up to remove the left axial lymph nodes, a Hernia Op and the perinael biopsy, which has meant using a catheter each time. I'm probably a little blase about catheters now (but I still hate them). Here are some of my experiences.

Night time - I find wearing a pair of the same type of close fitting trunks as in the day suits me best. It's probably just psychological, but I feel that supporting the tube in place makes me feel more comfortable. I've never had any problems with leaks - even the night I forgot to turn the leg bag tap to on - I just woke up feeling the need to pee (and very stupid). In the hospital they strap the bag to the bed, which seems the best idea if you can do it, but I've just laid mine on an old towel as our bed isn't suitable. A bowl/bucket seems like a sensible idea, but you are very unlikely to need it.

After the biopsy I had all sorts of problems caused by blood clots bunging up the tube. First time I ended up in A&E, which wasn't a great experience. After that the blood clots were smaller but they were getting stuck in the nozzle that feeds into the bag. I know you shouldn't, but as I only had two leg bags I took them off and rinsed them through with hot water a couple of times. This time I'll ask for more leg bags if they only supply two. Just in case.

Also get some spare straps. They are not that sturdy and after being soaked and dried a couple of times start to fray, which can be uncomfortable if they rub.

 
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