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Baldness and more aggressive Prostate Cancer

User
Posted 26 Jan 2020 at 23:10

There has been quite a lot of research linking baldness to prostate cancer but according to an authoritive account linked below only going bald by 30 gives some links and they are towards more aggressive cases.  It says the studies all cover different and smaller areas of proof to answer the question fully   

It leaves open the question should men who go bald early be screened for prostate cancer.

 .......................................................

From The Prostate Cancer Foundation website:

‘Right now, men known to be at higher risk for prostate cancer are:

· Men with a family history of prostate cancer, and of other types of cancer.

· Men of African descent.

· To a lesser extent, men who smoke and men who are overweight.

It looks like we need to expand this category to include men with frontal plus moderate vertex baldness.   “Out of 143 forms of adult cancer,” says Simons, “prostate cancer is the only cancer where a hair feature that can be evident from across the room is associated with cancer risk.  There’s nothing else in oncology like that kind of association.”

A very important note:  We’re talking about men who develop this baldness in their twenties and thirties.  More studies are needed to figure out the specifics of when prostate cancer screening for these men needs to start, but it very well may need to begin when men are in their thirties. This is because the men with this pattern of baldness who do develop prostate cancer – and not all of them do, for reasons we don’t understand, perhaps involving such environmental factors as diet, weight, and exercise – have higher Gleason-grade cancer.’

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The above interests me as I started going bald around 20 and by 30 was well on the way.   I also shaved early and had more body hair which I put down to testosterone.   Coming down my mothers side from her father.  She also got breast cancer in her 50s.  If that’s significant, I think it might be even if just by a bit.  My Gleason was 4+4.  

I also read somewhere the aggressiveness could apply to any recurrence.

 

The above was written by a science writer as linked here:

https://www.pcf.org/c/fallout-from-new-study-men-with-early-balding-may-be-at-higher-risk-of-aggressive-prostate-cancer/

 

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Another more detailed account is here:

‘When subgroup analysis by types of baldness, a statistically significant association was observed for vertex baldness (RR 1.24, 95% CI 1.05–1.46) but not for other types of baldness.’

‘As male pattern baldness generally occurs decades earlier than prostate cancer, baldness may serve as a potential noninvasive screening indicator for prostate cancer if a clear association between male pattern baldness and prostate cancer could be established.‘

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6076190/

 

 

User
Posted 29 Jan 2020 at 20:11

I don't think she was getting at me Andrew but it was more dismissive than I think appropriate for a topic that could hold some truth in my own case.

User
Posted 29 Jan 2020 at 21:37
She wasn't being dismissive, just efficient and factual - limited and sporadic internet access coupled with a personality flaw. Perhaps she hoped you would feel reassured?
"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

User
Posted 29 Jan 2020 at 21:55

Sorry Lyn.  He did feel a bit re-assured but he can be a bit touchy at times.  I keep telling him.

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User
Posted 27 Jan 2020 at 06:26
The 2 guys I know who died of PC both had a full head of hair.
User
Posted 27 Jan 2020 at 06:43

Peter

I did once comment to my OH that the men who attended the same consultant clinic as myself were either old or young and bald.

Thanks Chris 

User
Posted 27 Jan 2020 at 08:25
Lost most of my hair in my 20s... but a PSA test when I was about 50 was under 1 so no indication that hair loss caused PC to come early. I was diagnosed when I was 67.
User
Posted 27 Jan 2020 at 10:07
My father went bald in his twenties, and only had a prostate problem which we would call now BPH, no cancer.

I have a half ‘full head of hair’ i.e. nearly bald, and I was diagnosed aged 62.

Cheers, John.

User
Posted 27 Jan 2020 at 13:26
Have to repair quickly to Dr Google with the query ‘frontal plus moderate vertex baldness’ (in bold).

Cheers, John.

User
Posted 27 Jan 2020 at 13:34
I have just done so, and it seems baldies are prone to all kinds of hideous diseases, like everyone else.

However it seems we are totally immune from the Chinese coronavirus, due to our phalacrosis.

Cheers, John.

P.S. Don’t believe everything you read on the internet!

User
Posted 28 Jan 2020 at 10:47

Hi folks, There are quite a few diagrams.  I hadn't heard of vertex before, back half of top.  When it's all gone it becomes a bit irrelevant.

The main point is should men who went bald early be screened at some point or be treated as more urgent, higher risk, for new or recurrence cases.

I think there's a case to cause suspicion and for such men to be more aware of the risk and symptoms to look out for.  Doctors should make sure they're aware if they present themselves.  Unless its mandated it's unlikely to happen though.

 

User
Posted 28 Jan 2020 at 19:31
This is lazy reporting - the research was conducted in 2012 and published in 2014, citing other research projects from as far back as the 1970s. The links weren't strong enough to warrant any further/ additional research time. It is a link but no more than that.

Interestingly, a number of the men that I have investigated over the years have been bald but I don't think we can say yet that bald men shouldn't work with children.

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

User
Posted 28 Jan 2020 at 22:28

I’ve never thought much about any connection with baldness, but I have wondered about teenage acne.  I had really, really horrendous acne as a teenager.  I’ve often wondered if there was any connection between that and my early diagnosis at 46.

User
Posted 28 Jan 2020 at 23:51

Originally Posted by: Online Community Member

I have wondered about teenage acne.  I had really, really horrendous acne as a teenager.  I’ve often wondered if there was any connection between that and my early diagnosis at 46.

Yes, there's a strong correlation with teenage acne.

Some positive prostate biopsies contain the acne bacteria, even when patient hasn't had acne for years.

This lead to more research through US army medical records. New recruits where acne was noted were significantly more likely to get prostate cancer in later life.

Although the correlation is well established, the causal link is not known as far as I know. It might be that it's really important to treat teenage acne to avoid at least one cause of PCa. On the other hand, it might be that both the acne and the PCa are caused by something else, and treating the acne would have no effect.

This is a correlation that relates to events during puberty. There are others too, such as lack of vitamin D. This leads to some speculation that it's things that happen during puberty that trigger PCa, rather than things that happen afterwards. It might explain why most of the lifestyle things that increase risk of most cancers seem to have little impact on PCa risk, and the window for events to trigger PCa might be mostly just during puberty.

Edited by member 28 Jan 2020 at 23:52  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 29 Jan 2020 at 00:24
Neither John, my dad or Stan had spots as teenagers, let alone acne. Since the vast majority of men apparently have some prostate cancer, researchers will be able to find evidence of just about any link they fancy ... men who went to school, men who rode a bicycle without stabilisers, men who were boys when they were younger?
"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

User
Posted 29 Jan 2020 at 08:42
s*** I always knew I should have had stabilisers!
User
Posted 29 Jan 2020 at 09:41
🤣
"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

User
Posted 29 Jan 2020 at 17:48

I don't agree with Lyn's comment about lazy reporting.   It doesn't matter when it was reported or whether individuals have met bald men or men with huge amounts of hair who behaved in a certain way.

As baldness and prostate cancer can both be related to testosterone there is a more obvious line of thought and it's something that's been in the back of my mind.

I now think the likelihood of an effect is lower after reading this.  Although having now met both criteria of early balding and prostate cancer it's something I'm going to be watching for any new evidence.

 

User
Posted 29 Jan 2020 at 20:11

I don't think she was getting at me Andrew but it was more dismissive than I think appropriate for a topic that could hold some truth in my own case.

User
Posted 29 Jan 2020 at 21:37
She wasn't being dismissive, just efficient and factual - limited and sporadic internet access coupled with a personality flaw. Perhaps she hoped you would feel reassured?
"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

User
Posted 29 Jan 2020 at 21:55

Sorry Lyn.  He did feel a bit re-assured but he can be a bit touchy at times.  I keep telling him.

User
Posted 30 Jan 2020 at 00:54
Don't apologise! This is a sh1t disease and a sh1t situation - who wouldn't get tetchy sometimes and I am aware that I can be a bit perfunctory although I would never intend to hurt anyone.
"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

 
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