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Road Bike Saddles

User
Posted 19 Jul 2020 at 11:40

Hi all

I have been keeping up with a number of threads regarding getting back into the saddle (excuse the pun) following surgery and starting to ride a road bike.  I am not going to open up the "when to start" debate as this has been well covered and I am likely to give it more time than less before I do start.  However, one of the areas that has emerged is the question of type of saddle.  Both in this forum, and others on t'internet, there is some debate about whether the cut out or "no-nose" saddle is best; there does not seem to be a clear direction of which might be best, with pros and cons with both.  I intend to talk more when I look to buy a new saddle but does anyone in this community have any personal experiences that they might like to share?  I am also assuming that the wider and more supportive saddle on an indoor exercise bike does not have the same issues as the pressure around the perineum is less focused and so better to manage with time on the bike and additional padding.

Many thanks

User
Posted 19 Jul 2020 at 16:00

I bought no-nose saddles for both my bikes when I started radiotherapy. Actually, we were told not to ride out bikes, which my onco thought was OTT. I had already ordered the no-nose saddle at that point, showed it to the radiotherapists, and they said, That should be fine.

No-nose is rather misleading in terms of the feature I was after - no perineum would be a better description, so you are sitting on your pelvis bone, and there's nothing under the perineum.

This is the one I got:
https://www.amazon.co.uk/VGEBY1-Bicycle-Ergonomic-Noseless-Accessory/dp/B07R61NZ4V/

It took about 3 rides to get used to them and get them adjusted comfortably. I don't need them anymore, but I've kept them on the bikes and now find them comfortable. I have recommended them to a few people, and at least one of them said it was dire and gave up. I don't think he put in any time to get used to it or adjust it though.

Without the nose, there's not much to prevent it slipping out sideways if you're mountain biking, but you quickly get used to using your arm and leg muscles to perform that function.

User
Posted 19 Jul 2020 at 16:39

Amazon have a huge range. I recently bought a Selle SMP for just under £40. It has a nose but a large cut out. All the weight is on your sit bones and no pressure at all on the pereneum. I find it the most comfortable I have ever had.

Cheers
Bill

User
Posted 19 Jul 2020 at 19:48
John bought a cut out saddle from Wiggle soon after his RP but there wasn't much choice in those days so I don't think we had even heard of a noseless saddle! He still uses that on his mountain bike but has a normal saddle on both road bikes.
"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

User
Posted 19 Jul 2020 at 21:57

I have a Specialized Sitero expert gel which has not much of a nose compared to a road bike saddle AND a large perineal cutout. So frustrating we can't post photos here, but there is one here --->  https://www.specialized.com/gb/en/sitero-expert-gel/p/156073

I've also tried to create an album on google showing it compared to a standard road saddle. Hope it works... https://photos.app.goo.gl/bCsKCSKNxD52Furc9

I've been using it a lot pre-surgery and got used to it Feb-June (~2.5k miles). But since my post RARP 6-week 'sentence' is not up until Friday 24th (that's 4 days and about 10 hours) I can't yet say what my experience will be.

If you're not used to using your sit bones (I used to perch on the end of a standard road bike saddle until I got perineal pain, which made me get checked out - glad I did) it takes some acclimatisation, but there is not really any perineal contact as such.

 

_____

Two cannibals named Ectomy and Prost, all alone on a Desert island.

Prost was the strongest, so Prost ate Ectomy.

User
Posted 19 Jul 2020 at 22:23
Just to say that when this new forum was being developed, PCUK consulted with us as members and we chose not to allow photos - the prospect of people uploading pictures of cloudy urine or weeping wounds was more than most us could bear. No doubt the charity will develop the forum again some day and a new generation of members might decide differently but it was our decision, not PCUK's.
"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

User
Posted 20 Jul 2020 at 07:26

Originally Posted by: Online Community Member
Just to say that when this new forum was being developed, PCUK consulted with us as members and we chose not to allow photos - the prospect of people uploading pictures of cloudy urine or weeping wounds was more than most us could bear. No doubt the charity will develop the forum again some day and a new generation of members might decide differently but it was our decision, not PCUK's.

When you put it like that, it makes sense👍. I had wondered if that (or something like it) might be the reason. 

_____

Two cannibals named Ectomy and Prost, all alone on a Desert island.

Prost was the strongest, so Prost ate Ectomy.

User
User
Posted 20 Jul 2020 at 16:45

Been very grateful for the responses so far.  I have looked at the links and have some better ideas.  Thanks very much.

User
Posted 22 Jul 2020 at 12:15

Although not a roadie, this thread prompted me to change the saddle on my mountain bike. I am 8 months post OP and started riding again two months ago and get a bit achy after a few miles. My old one is an (11 year old) WTB Rocket which has a shallow groove in the top but is on the firm side. 

I have just fitted one of the gel filled ones from Amazon which for £20 seems ok on a short ride. I'll see how it goes over the next few months and maybe reach into my deep pockets for something more expensive if my perineum approves.

Cheers all.

Kev.

 

Edited by member 22 Jul 2020 at 12:16  | Reason: Finger trouble.

User
Posted 22 Jul 2020 at 16:50
I have an SMP Trk Gel saddle with a cutout. No pressure and very comfortable.

Best wishes,

Chris

User
Posted 23 Jul 2020 at 22:15

Both my road bike and hybrid have brooks leather saddles, not had any problems since getting back on either one, but they are both well moulded to my bum! 

User
Posted 21 Sep 2020 at 12:06
All, thanks for all the responses. I am now, literally and practically, back in the saddle having started riding again last week. This also followed advice from my specialist who was happy for me to start but did recommend that it was a slow and patent process. Therefore, I did two weeks on my indoor bike (very large seat plenty of padding) before going out into the big world. Following some research and then advice, I went for the following saddle

https://www.evanscycles.com/brand/specialized/power-expert-saddle-931417#colcode=93141703

It is working for me, taking most if not all of the pressure from the perineum and placing most of the force onto the sitting bones. It has a long enough nose to be noticeable without being too intrusive, which also means I have not had any of the balance issues that some on this thread have noticed with either very short or no nose saddles. Safe riding

User
Posted 21 Sep 2020 at 15:18

Excellent. Good to hear you're back riding again.

That saddle looks a lot like my sitero, but with a slightly longer snout. I bought the sitero because I spend a lot of time on the aero bars (in the time trialling position, like in my avatar) which also means I tilt the saddle forward a bit. Makes life a bit harder when on the hoods, but I mostly use either the drops or the aero bars.

Enjoy your riding. My surgeon said "your perineum will let you know if you do too much" but I've ramped gradually back up to 40 miles over a couple of months. Mostly do a 20ish mile ride now, mainly because of time constraints. But my VO2max is within a whisker of where it was pre-surgery. 😀

_____

Two cannibals named Ectomy and Prost, all alone on a Desert island.

Prost was the strongest, so Prost ate Ectomy.

 
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