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Confusing result

User
Posted 11 Feb 2021 at 16:26

I've just contacted my doctor's about my PSA result and the receptionist said "se prostate: normal". anyone got any idea what se stands for.  Receptionist didn't have a clue and no doctor was available.

User
Posted 11 Feb 2021 at 19:52
Could it just be a typo... and the se should read re?
User
Posted 11 Feb 2021 at 19:56
That would be my guess too.

User
Posted 11 Feb 2021 at 21:49

I would never accept that a PSA is " normal" know what your PSA should be and ideally get a copy of the lab report. 

Thanks Chris

User
Posted 11 Feb 2021 at 22:41
Chances are receptionist just looks at PSA and the age range on report and seeing it is within parameters says it is normal. On more than one occasion this happened to me and I insisted on the precise figure. I then explained to the receptionist that it might be normal for somebody who had not received treatment but not for somebody who had had treatment. PSA can fluctuate but it's helpful to follow figures.
Barry
User
Posted 12 Feb 2021 at 00:01

I seem to remember my results come back as "se prostate specific ag level" I believe the se stands for serum and ag for antigen. As others have said, normal is not a helpful word, you need the numbers and you need to keep a track of them.

Never accept a typo in your test results. If they can make a spelling mistake, how can you trust they typed the numbers right. 

Edited by member 12 Feb 2021 at 00:05  | Reason: Not specified

Dave

User
Posted 12 Feb 2021 at 14:33

Yes, that sort of attitude really annoys me. I guess some of their patients will not understand what the number means so they like just to be able to say "Normal", but surely there must be lots of patients like us who need to monitor our condition. 

Dave

User
Posted 12 Feb 2021 at 15:29

Originally Posted by: Online Community Member

Yes, that sort of attitude really annoys me. I guess some of their patients will not understand what the number means so they like just to be able to say "Normal", but surely there must be lots of patients like us who need to monitor our condition. 

 

We followed this up at our GP practice because they were constantly telling J  it was 'normal' rather than the detail. they explained that when the result comes in, they look at whether it is under the age limit (4.0 or 3.1 or whatever) and mark it on the system as normal or abnormal. The GP then looks at the result and flags it for further action where necessary - e.g. if it is above normal range or the person is known to have PCa. The receptionists aren't medically trained and don't have access to the patient's health history - all they can do is read what is on their screen.  

John always goes to the GP practice now and requests a print out of the results. 

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

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User
Posted 11 Feb 2021 at 19:52
Could it just be a typo... and the se should read re?
User
Posted 11 Feb 2021 at 19:56
That would be my guess too.

User
Posted 11 Feb 2021 at 21:49

I would never accept that a PSA is " normal" know what your PSA should be and ideally get a copy of the lab report. 

Thanks Chris

User
Posted 11 Feb 2021 at 21:59

I will do.

Thanks Chris

Paul

User
Posted 11 Feb 2021 at 22:41
Chances are receptionist just looks at PSA and the age range on report and seeing it is within parameters says it is normal. On more than one occasion this happened to me and I insisted on the precise figure. I then explained to the receptionist that it might be normal for somebody who had not received treatment but not for somebody who had had treatment. PSA can fluctuate but it's helpful to follow figures.
Barry
User
Posted 12 Feb 2021 at 00:01

I seem to remember my results come back as "se prostate specific ag level" I believe the se stands for serum and ag for antigen. As others have said, normal is not a helpful word, you need the numbers and you need to keep a track of them.

Never accept a typo in your test results. If they can make a spelling mistake, how can you trust they typed the numbers right. 

Edited by member 12 Feb 2021 at 00:05  | Reason: Not specified

Dave

User
Posted 12 Feb 2021 at 07:53

Thanks for all your advice on this.  I'm assuming the result is "normal" in terms of someone's assessment but will need to get more details.  The receptionist also said there is "something about electrolytes being normal and another result that the doctor has not seen" and therefore cannot tell me. What can that be, I ask myself.  Don't receptionists realise that this getting information is very stressful, especially if, like me, you may suffer from extreme health anxiety.

User
Posted 12 Feb 2021 at 07:55

Thanks again for all your replies.  It seems that I'm not alone with these concerns.

Paul

User
Posted 12 Feb 2021 at 14:00

Eventually got back to the receptionist who tried to fob me off again.  I persisted and told her to give me the exact figure which was 1.2.  Why couldn't she have done that yesterday?

User
Posted 12 Feb 2021 at 14:33

Yes, that sort of attitude really annoys me. I guess some of their patients will not understand what the number means so they like just to be able to say "Normal", but surely there must be lots of patients like us who need to monitor our condition. 

Dave

User
Posted 12 Feb 2021 at 15:08

I agree but I don't think they should assume any patient is clueless.

User
Posted 12 Feb 2021 at 15:24
SITES, do you still have a prostate?
"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

User
Posted 12 Feb 2021 at 15:26

Yes I do Lyn but I had some urinary problems and they were being investigated, thus the PSA test.

Paul

User
Posted 12 Feb 2021 at 15:29

Originally Posted by: Online Community Member

Yes, that sort of attitude really annoys me. I guess some of their patients will not understand what the number means so they like just to be able to say "Normal", but surely there must be lots of patients like us who need to monitor our condition. 

 

We followed this up at our GP practice because they were constantly telling J  it was 'normal' rather than the detail. they explained that when the result comes in, they look at whether it is under the age limit (4.0 or 3.1 or whatever) and mark it on the system as normal or abnormal. The GP then looks at the result and flags it for further action where necessary - e.g. if it is above normal range or the person is known to have PCa. The receptionists aren't medically trained and don't have access to the patient's health history - all they can do is read what is on their screen.  

John always goes to the GP practice now and requests a print out of the results. 

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

User
Posted 12 Feb 2021 at 15:30

Originally Posted by: Online Community Member

Yes I do Lyn but I had some urinary problems and they were being investigated, thus the PSA test.

Paul

Phew 

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

 
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