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Starting radiotherapy on monday

User
Posted 11 Apr 2021 at 10:54

Hi guys , im starting my radiotherapy on monday , been training the bladder and drinking plenty of water in the build up to it , but im looking for some helpful tips on waiting on treatment and holding my pee in untill its over..thanks

User
Posted 11 Apr 2021 at 15:19

Bobby. On arrival check they are running on time,  if there is a delay you may need to delay drinking the suggested amount of liquid. The staff have seen it all before and will help as required.

I wore an incontinence pad just in case and had a urine bottle in my bag, never needed it but it was a comfort knowing it was there in case of emergencies. The staff did say I could use the bottle in the treatment room if I really needed it.

Find out where all the toilets are, I found a couple of toilet tucked away that were always available.

Some guys don't have problems. It may be a bit of a moving target as treatment progresses.

Hope all goes well.

Thanks Chris

User
Posted 11 Apr 2021 at 16:00

Cheers chris , thanks for the help , i just found it really hard holding it in when i went to get my tattoos , i think i may of drank to much water before i arrived at the hospital,  ive been training myself to hold it in for an hour , after that its pretty painful .

User
Posted 11 Apr 2021 at 16:28
The procedure is probably different at every hospital, Bobby, but when I had my treatment at Clatterbridge the procedure was to empty my bladder 20m before my treatment and then drink my three cups of water.

Most men have no real side-effects until quite late in the treatment. I had (I think) 32 sessions, so that took six and a half weeks. I had no real issues for the first four weeks, but after that I had an increasing amount of bladder irritation and a need to pee frequently. The side-effects generally peak around two weeks after treatment ends, and then fade quite quickly. When I was having to pee every 45m all night long towards the end of my treatment I bought a plastic urine bottle (Amazon) so I didn't have to get out of bed, and that was an enormous help.

Very best wishes for your treatment,

Chris

User
Posted 11 Apr 2021 at 17:32
Wear joggers and boxers , easy to change etc especially after the RT you will want to pee pretty quick , also get a toilet card , as said carry a pee bottle in car for on way home , I found it most interesting the process and it was like a family in the waiting area. You get to see the same people every day , how many fractions again ? You will be surprised how quick it goes , once in the rhythm . They usually play a little music in the treatment room I remember β€˜bat out of hell β€˜ !
User
Posted 11 Apr 2021 at 17:32
Good luck
User
Posted 13 Apr 2021 at 07:17

I would add that you should be doing pelvic floor exercises. This is because the radiotherapy will make your sphincter muscles temporarily weaker. You still have time as it will probably be at least a couple of weeks before you start having any problems. This came in really handy later on and kept me dry when I'm not sure I would have been otherwise. I even managed to go to the loo and let out just 100ml from a full bladder when they were running late, and to go out to have a fart without losing all the water, which the radiographers (and I) was quite amazed I was capable of - I'm sure this was down to the pelvic floor exercises.

User
Posted 13 Apr 2021 at 08:05
How did the session go, Bobby?

Best wishes,

Chris

User
Posted 13 Apr 2021 at 08:07

Hi andy , hope all is well with ya , i shall try the pelvic work out ..but dont know of i will be able to get up off the floor with my back pain lol cheers bud

User
Posted 13 Apr 2021 at 09:58
πŸ˜‚
"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

User
Posted 18 Apr 2021 at 08:42

hi on decapeptyl every 3 months done 32 off my 37 r/t sessions feeling ok with minimal issues up to press good luck

 
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