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Chemo real life

User
Posted 11 May 2021 at 14:23

Hello! My name is Helga. 

I apologize in advance for my English, because this is not my native language.
But I try. and with the help of a translator in the 21st century I hope it is possible. 
If this offends anyone, I apologize again.

I have read many forums in my country, but little useful information and real stories.  However, this forum is really helpful. 

My situation: Father, 74 years old. T3aNxM1, Prostate cancer. Gleason score 4+5 (bone metastases). 
Therapy: Abiraterone acetate (Zytiga), denosumab (xgeva), goserelin (Zoladex). 

We have successfully shot down PSA in 2018 (0-0,2), after a long examination, biopsy, hospitalization, weight loss, etc. and my father was OK, he seemed healthy at times.

in November 2020 PSA 30,2. In May 2021 PSA 140. 
Hormone therapy doesn't work. 
CT scan showed liver metostasis and bone progression extensively. 
I was thinking about immunotherapy, but the BCRA2 test result was negative.
Doctors only offer chemo (Docetaxel). 

And I think this is the worst offer and I am very afraid for his health, given his age, weakness, and I will have to tell him about the incurable diagnosis.
 
I need advice, good or bad stories, recommendations and whatever. 

Thanks in advance
Best Regards,

Helga

Edited by moderator 11 May 2021 at 14:31  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 11 May 2021 at 17:48
Docetaxel is not to be feared. It is generally well tolerated, it is not as brutal as some types of chemotherapy. Prostate cancer that has become hormone independent / castrate resistant (as your father's has) can respond well to docetaxel and then it is found that the hormone treatment works for a bit longer. My father-in-law had docetaxel at age 79 and didn't really have any problem with it.

In the UK, your father would have been informed by the doctors at first diagnosis that he was incurable. With mets in his liver, he needs to know the situation so that he can get his affairs in order.

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

User
Posted 11 May 2021 at 20:37

I understand that many men tolerate the chemotherapy well and my husband did well whilst actually undergoing the treatment but the later side effects were very bad and had we known how bad they would be, I think he would have opted for a better quality of life even if it had been shorter. I wouldn't wish it on anybody and it didn't work. His cancer became very aggressive, he had kidney failure and a very hard time. I would ask what the alternative option would be- maybe managed pain care or something. That was however just our experience and he died 5 months after the end of chemotherapy. 

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User
Posted 11 May 2021 at 17:48
Docetaxel is not to be feared. It is generally well tolerated, it is not as brutal as some types of chemotherapy. Prostate cancer that has become hormone independent / castrate resistant (as your father's has) can respond well to docetaxel and then it is found that the hormone treatment works for a bit longer. My father-in-law had docetaxel at age 79 and didn't really have any problem with it.

In the UK, your father would have been informed by the doctors at first diagnosis that he was incurable. With mets in his liver, he needs to know the situation so that he can get his affairs in order.

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

User
Posted 11 May 2021 at 20:37

I understand that many men tolerate the chemotherapy well and my husband did well whilst actually undergoing the treatment but the later side effects were very bad and had we known how bad they would be, I think he would have opted for a better quality of life even if it had been shorter. I wouldn't wish it on anybody and it didn't work. His cancer became very aggressive, he had kidney failure and a very hard time. I would ask what the alternative option would be- maybe managed pain care or something. That was however just our experience and he died 5 months after the end of chemotherapy. 

 
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