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fitness after Recovery

User
Posted 12 May 2021 at 20:50

Good evening guys I am soon to have my prostate removed I am 69 years old and in what I think is good condition I run 3 to 4  times a week and workout 4 to 5 times a week and have done so most of my life, my question is will I be able to follow the same regime after surgery and recovery any info or advice would be appreciated.

Many Regards and All the best fella's

User
Posted 13 May 2021 at 08:35
Yes, you will, but it'll take a while. You're having major surgery and all sorts of major abdominal muscles get cut. Healing takes time. Listen to what your body tells you in terms of pain and don't overdo it. You won't be able to lift anything over 1kg for the first couple of weeks (and don't think of trying to). After a month you should be able to walk a couple of miles. I had very similar surgery in 2018 and it took 3-6 months before I was back to normal physically.

Best wishes for your surgery,

Chris

User
Posted 13 May 2021 at 10:07
I managed long walks (up to 1.5 hours) after 3-4 weeks. Cycled yesterday a short distance after replacing a couple of inner-tubes (5 and a bit weeks post-op). I am 68 btw but do not follow as rigorous an exercise regime as you so you ought to do just as well if not better. My surgery was robotic.
User
Posted 13 May 2021 at 10:43
I don't know if your gym sessions involve weights, but they're the things to exercise most caution with. Overdoing it could tear half-healed muscles. Take care!

Chris

User
Posted 13 May 2021 at 12:29
Just following up on Edulis's comment - please note that men should not cycle until at least they have had their 6/8 week post-op review with the surgeon. Even then, it may be wise to delay getting back on a bike - my husband (a keen cyclist) was told by his surgeon not to cycle for 6 months - he said "what is the point of me taking care to preserve the nerves if you are not going to give yourself the best chance of nerve recovery.

I am aware that not all urologists agree that cycling too soon can prevent recovery from ED but in our case, J decided that if he ignored the surgeon's advice and was left with permanent ED he would always wonder whether it was his own fault. As a wife, I am fairly certain that if he had got on his bike before the 6 month mark, I would have been very resentful all these years since.

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

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User
Posted 13 May 2021 at 08:35
Yes, you will, but it'll take a while. You're having major surgery and all sorts of major abdominal muscles get cut. Healing takes time. Listen to what your body tells you in terms of pain and don't overdo it. You won't be able to lift anything over 1kg for the first couple of weeks (and don't think of trying to). After a month you should be able to walk a couple of miles. I had very similar surgery in 2018 and it took 3-6 months before I was back to normal physically.

Best wishes for your surgery,

Chris

User
Posted 13 May 2021 at 10:07
I managed long walks (up to 1.5 hours) after 3-4 weeks. Cycled yesterday a short distance after replacing a couple of inner-tubes (5 and a bit weeks post-op). I am 68 btw but do not follow as rigorous an exercise regime as you so you ought to do just as well if not better. My surgery was robotic.
User
Posted 13 May 2021 at 10:43
I don't know if your gym sessions involve weights, but they're the things to exercise most caution with. Overdoing it could tear half-healed muscles. Take care!

Chris

User
Posted 13 May 2021 at 12:29
Just following up on Edulis's comment - please note that men should not cycle until at least they have had their 6/8 week post-op review with the surgeon. Even then, it may be wise to delay getting back on a bike - my husband (a keen cyclist) was told by his surgeon not to cycle for 6 months - he said "what is the point of me taking care to preserve the nerves if you are not going to give yourself the best chance of nerve recovery.

I am aware that not all urologists agree that cycling too soon can prevent recovery from ED but in our case, J decided that if he ignored the surgeon's advice and was left with permanent ED he would always wonder whether it was his own fault. As a wife, I am fairly certain that if he had got on his bike before the 6 month mark, I would have been very resentful all these years since.

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

 
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