I'm interested in conversations about and I want to talk about
Know exactly what you want?
Show search

Notification

Error

3+3+ Gleason score

User
Posted 29 Jun 2021 at 07:30

So, I got my results from my biopsy back yesterday sad it’s came back positive a Gleason score of 6 which if there is anything good I can take from this is that it is on the lower risk so, I guess I should be thankful it’s not higher.

I guess I could do with some encouragement and advice.

thank you.

User
Posted 29 Jun 2021 at 09:03

Hi Lindo,

Sorry you are here but 3+3 is the lowest score you can have that gets you in the club.What staging have they given you? I suspect you will have a full range of treatment options including active surveillance.

I was 3 + 4 and was on active surveillace for over 2 years. It was only when the staging went to T2a (T1a originally) that I felt I needed to look at treatment.

Good luck

User
Posted 29 Jun 2021 at 11:29

As mentioned by John, 3 +3= 6 is a very good score (obviously no reading at all would be better still) and the consultant at Addenbrookes where I am a patient told me that there are very serious discussions taking place in the medical community whether a Gleason score of 6 should be assessed as having cancer

User
Posted 30 Jun 2021 at 19:04

 I was 3+3  Gleason 6 and did go on W+W. However my PSA levels climbed rapidly over some months to over 10.

At that point my urologist suggested treatment. I well remember his comment " There is probably something else going on in there".  So 3+3 can need treatment.

John

Gleason 6 = 3+3 PSA 8.8 P. volume 48 cc Left Cores 3/3, Volume = 20% PSA 10.8 Feb '19 PSA 1.2

Jan '20 PSA 0.3 July '20 0.1 Jan. 21 < 0.1

User
Posted 01 Jul 2021 at 22:05

Hi Lindo,

I was initially diagnosed with Gleason Score of 6 and told I was the lowest possible risk.  My scan showed 6mm but a biopsy showed cancer on both sides (T2c)

I had surgery 7/1/21 and told by the surgeon my cancer had grown to 3 cubic cm on left and 2 cubic cm on right.  Having surgery definitely saved my life!

From my own experience I am glad I listened to the consultant.  I am not going to deny the initial diagnosis was scary but people on this site certainly helped me through the whole experience with advice and support.

I’m 52 and had the normal side effects of surgery but almost 6 months on, life is almost back to normal so stay positive and listen to the medical experts.

Best wishes.

Neil

User
Posted 01 Jul 2021 at 23:03
That seems like a very sensible plan of action to me - another MRI in 6 months means that you can enjoy the summer and then opt for surgery in the winter months when there is less to do anyway. After 16 months of lockdowns & limitations, it seems a shame to ruin July, August, September with an operation & then dealing with the known & potential side effects.
"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

User
Posted 01 Jul 2021 at 23:03

Hi,

I had radical prostatectomy with all nerves spared (not via the robot) and was in hospital for 3 nights.

After the catheter was removed I started my recovery and have no incontinence issues and with the help of viagra and the pump, have a normal sex life.  Only yesterday I was talking to my cancer specialist nurse who thinks that within the next few months I will not even need the pump.

Having monthly Physio helped me with pelvic floor exercises and I’m sure if I had started doing those pre op, my full recovery would have been even quicker.

My PSA levels are now ‘undetectable’ and I look back and know I made the right decision.

I really was a nervous wreck when initially diagnosed but the support from people on here helped me enormously.  Hopefully you will have good communication with the surgeon and cancer specialist nurse and discuss all options.  The future I’m sure will be positive whatever you decide.  I wish you all the best.  Remember….. positive thoughts !!

User
Posted 05 Aug 2021 at 19:08

Hi All,

Just to update on my decision. The Consultant and I decided to go for active surveillance  so, MR scan in 6 months and psa tests. So I guess I will try and remain positive and hope that on my next scan little if anything will have changed (fingers crossed)
I would just like to ask you all something that has been playing on my mind we have a particular close friend who has not even been in touch or even asked how my wife is feeling about all this. Also most of my male friends offered  support yet non of their wives said anything when we all met up recently. 

is this normal? I for one would have at least of said are you ok. 

maybe you know who your reel friends are in times like these?

 

User
Posted 05 Aug 2021 at 20:05

Thanks for the update.  In regards to your other point, I do think it may because they just don’t know what to say or how you may react if they bring the subject up.  I doubt that they don’t care, it’s more a case of not wishing to make you feel uncomfortable.  
It will be nice if you keep updating the group on your progress and if you ever need additional support, this site is always there for you.  All the best, Neil

User
Posted 05 Aug 2021 at 20:21

There was an article on the news about that, just recently. 

https://www.bbc.com/news/newsbeat-58033162.amp

I have to say I didn't notice any change in my friends behaviour towards me. I can understand that some people may just not know what to say. I would view that as their problem, and whenever a friend of mine has a problem I like to help, so I would be very open to them and encourage them to talk to me and get over their awkwardness. I wouldn't judge them negatively unless they explicitly said to me, "you have been cursed by this disease, due to your moral turpitude" then I would realise they probably had a problem I could not help them with.

p. s. I don't know what moral turpitude is, but it was on a US immigration form, and as it was in the same batch of questions as "are you a terrorist?, are you a communist?, are you a convicted felon?, have you committed an act of moral turpitude? " I assume it is the sort of question you answer NO to. Anyway they let me in to the States, and I went to Nevada, where I probably committed acts of moral turpitude, but what happens in Vegas stays in Vegas. 

Edited by member 05 Aug 2021 at 20:29  | Reason: Not specified

Dave

User
Posted 05 Aug 2021 at 20:51
I think a lot of women will be reluctant to ask about your nether regions; no male friend ever asked me about my breasts or the removal of my cervix. Having said that, I have raised the topic of John's prostate cancer and the impact of treatment with my female friends and they were interested and supportive but I guess it took me to start the conversation.
"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

User
Posted 06 Aug 2021 at 00:04
When John returned to work after his op, he noticed that an employee wouldn't come into his office - just stayed at the door. Eventually, J said "it's okay, you can't catch it from me!" to which the response was "well, you can't be sure of that, can you?"

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

Show Most Thanked Posts
User
Posted 29 Jun 2021 at 09:03

Hi Lindo,

Sorry you are here but 3+3 is the lowest score you can have that gets you in the club.What staging have they given you? I suspect you will have a full range of treatment options including active surveillance.

I was 3 + 4 and was on active surveillace for over 2 years. It was only when the staging went to T2a (T1a originally) that I felt I needed to look at treatment.

Good luck

User
Posted 29 Jun 2021 at 09:16
There is a school of thought that G 3+3=6 should not even be called ‘cancer’, and maybe ‘a little trouble down below’ instead, to use the medical term!

If you had a critical illness insurance policy, many insurers would not pay out as your condition is not classed as ‘life-threatening’.

I would go for many years of active surveillance for as long as your medics think you can get away with it, subject to quarterly PSA tests and annual MRI scans and consultations with your specialist.

Best of luck.

Cheers, John.

User
Posted 29 Jun 2021 at 11:29

As mentioned by John, 3 +3= 6 is a very good score (obviously no reading at all would be better still) and the consultant at Addenbrookes where I am a patient told me that there are very serious discussions taking place in the medical community whether a Gleason score of 6 should be assessed as having cancer

User
Posted 30 Jun 2021 at 19:04

 I was 3+3  Gleason 6 and did go on W+W. However my PSA levels climbed rapidly over some months to over 10.

At that point my urologist suggested treatment. I well remember his comment " There is probably something else going on in there".  So 3+3 can need treatment.

John

Gleason 6 = 3+3 PSA 8.8 P. volume 48 cc Left Cores 3/3, Volume = 20% PSA 10.8 Feb '19 PSA 1.2

Jan '20 PSA 0.3 July '20 0.1 Jan. 21 < 0.1

User
Posted 30 Jun 2021 at 20:48
It is extremely rare but we have had a couple of men on here who had G6 (3+3) with mets so it is important that Lindo has all the diagnostic tests available before making a decision. AS is often suitable for men with G6 but if the biopsy showed that the cancer was very close to or already through the edge, he will be advised that radical treatment is needed.
"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

User
Posted 01 Jul 2021 at 22:05

Hi Lindo,

I was initially diagnosed with Gleason Score of 6 and told I was the lowest possible risk.  My scan showed 6mm but a biopsy showed cancer on both sides (T2c)

I had surgery 7/1/21 and told by the surgeon my cancer had grown to 3 cubic cm on left and 2 cubic cm on right.  Having surgery definitely saved my life!

From my own experience I am glad I listened to the consultant.  I am not going to deny the initial diagnosis was scary but people on this site certainly helped me through the whole experience with advice and support.

I’m 52 and had the normal side effects of surgery but almost 6 months on, life is almost back to normal so stay positive and listen to the medical experts.

Best wishes.

Neil

User
Posted 01 Jul 2021 at 22:14

Thank you Neil,

it’s very early days I was only told on Monday. Still in a bit of a shock it’s not really sunk in yet.

Do you mind telling me what surgery you had and how are you feeling now.

best or luck and health to you.

 

 

User
Posted 01 Jul 2021 at 22:26

This is all I have so far.

 

New diagnosis: Prostate cancer.
Histology – Gleason 3+3=6 from the abnormal areas seen on the
left hand side.
Four out of ten biopsies – Gleason 3+3=6, maximum cancer length 2mms, maximum core involvement 15%, no perineural invasion, no extraprostatic extension.
PSA 5.3.
MRI – PIRADS5 abnormal area, significant change between May 2020 and May 2021.
I reviewed this gentleman in the clinic today. The recent prostate biopsies have shown the presence of prostate cancer. Having said that, I went onto explain that the prostate cancer
that we found was of the lowest Gleason score and from this perspective, we would normally recommend active surveillance. The slightly complicating factor is that his MRI scan did show this PIRADS5 abnormal area.
In the first instance we are going to discuss this gentleman’s case at our NHS Urology Multi- Disciplinary meeting. My recommendation at this point, would be active surveillance, but instead of waiting a year for an MRI scan we would probably repeat this at six months. I will write once we have had the MDT discussion.


User
Posted 01 Jul 2021 at 23:03
That seems like a very sensible plan of action to me - another MRI in 6 months means that you can enjoy the summer and then opt for surgery in the winter months when there is less to do anyway. After 16 months of lockdowns & limitations, it seems a shame to ruin July, August, September with an operation & then dealing with the known & potential side effects.
"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

User
Posted 01 Jul 2021 at 23:03

Hi,

I had radical prostatectomy with all nerves spared (not via the robot) and was in hospital for 3 nights.

After the catheter was removed I started my recovery and have no incontinence issues and with the help of viagra and the pump, have a normal sex life.  Only yesterday I was talking to my cancer specialist nurse who thinks that within the next few months I will not even need the pump.

Having monthly Physio helped me with pelvic floor exercises and I’m sure if I had started doing those pre op, my full recovery would have been even quicker.

My PSA levels are now ‘undetectable’ and I look back and know I made the right decision.

I really was a nervous wreck when initially diagnosed but the support from people on here helped me enormously.  Hopefully you will have good communication with the surgeon and cancer specialist nurse and discuss all options.  The future I’m sure will be positive whatever you decide.  I wish you all the best.  Remember….. positive thoughts !!

User
Posted 02 Jul 2021 at 23:41

I can’t tell you how much that makes me feel-thank you ((:

User
Posted 05 Aug 2021 at 19:08

Hi All,

Just to update on my decision. The Consultant and I decided to go for active surveillance  so, MR scan in 6 months and psa tests. So I guess I will try and remain positive and hope that on my next scan little if anything will have changed (fingers crossed)
I would just like to ask you all something that has been playing on my mind we have a particular close friend who has not even been in touch or even asked how my wife is feeling about all this. Also most of my male friends offered  support yet non of their wives said anything when we all met up recently. 

is this normal? I for one would have at least of said are you ok. 

maybe you know who your reel friends are in times like these?

 

User
Posted 05 Aug 2021 at 19:41
Don’t be too hard on them. I think a lot of people just don’t know how they should react to a cancer diagnosis. They’re perhaps waiting to take the lead from you about whether or not you want to talk about it.

Best wishes,

Chris

User
Posted 05 Aug 2021 at 20:05

Thanks for the update.  In regards to your other point, I do think it may because they just don’t know what to say or how you may react if they bring the subject up.  I doubt that they don’t care, it’s more a case of not wishing to make you feel uncomfortable.  
It will be nice if you keep updating the group on your progress and if you ever need additional support, this site is always there for you.  All the best, Neil

User
Posted 05 Aug 2021 at 20:21

There was an article on the news about that, just recently. 

https://www.bbc.com/news/newsbeat-58033162.amp

I have to say I didn't notice any change in my friends behaviour towards me. I can understand that some people may just not know what to say. I would view that as their problem, and whenever a friend of mine has a problem I like to help, so I would be very open to them and encourage them to talk to me and get over their awkwardness. I wouldn't judge them negatively unless they explicitly said to me, "you have been cursed by this disease, due to your moral turpitude" then I would realise they probably had a problem I could not help them with.

p. s. I don't know what moral turpitude is, but it was on a US immigration form, and as it was in the same batch of questions as "are you a terrorist?, are you a communist?, are you a convicted felon?, have you committed an act of moral turpitude? " I assume it is the sort of question you answer NO to. Anyway they let me in to the States, and I went to Nevada, where I probably committed acts of moral turpitude, but what happens in Vegas stays in Vegas. 

Edited by member 05 Aug 2021 at 20:29  | Reason: Not specified

Dave

User
Posted 05 Aug 2021 at 20:51
I think a lot of women will be reluctant to ask about your nether regions; no male friend ever asked me about my breasts or the removal of my cervix. Having said that, I have raised the topic of John's prostate cancer and the impact of treatment with my female friends and they were interested and supportive but I guess it took me to start the conversation.
"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

User
Posted 05 Aug 2021 at 20:57

I wasn’t being hard on them. I’m not that kind of person. It was just an observation .

User
Posted 05 Aug 2021 at 21:00

I never thought about it that way , you have a point. I guess we all react in a different ways. Im not particularly upset she hasn’t approached me. I just thought she may have approached my wife as they are normally very close but nothing,not a word. It just doesn’t add up.

User
Posted 06 Aug 2021 at 00:04
When John returned to work after his op, he noticed that an employee wouldn't come into his office - just stayed at the door. Eventually, J said "it's okay, you can't catch it from me!" to which the response was "well, you can't be sure of that, can you?"

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

User
Posted 06 Aug 2021 at 09:03
When I was diagnosed, I had friends who I hadn’t spoken to for years, phone to wish me well, when the news got on the grapevine.

Moreover, I had two very close friends admit that they had PCa too, but they had been keeping it a secret! Others came out of the woodwork later, in the way that distant relatives pitch up if you die intestate…

Cheers, John.

 
Forum Jump  
©2021 Prostate Cancer UK