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Newly diagnosed Grade group 2

User
Posted 01 Jan 2022 at 10:25

Hello, 

Just posting as a close relative has been diagnosed with a Gleason 3+4 (grade group 2) prostate cancer, at age of 65. We’re trying to remain optimistic as we’ve been told the majority of the cancer is Gleason 3, with only a ‘little bit’ of Gleason 4, and the entire cancer volume at only 5% of the prostate gland. I’m finding myself trawling through research for peace of mind but it’s so easy to get bogged down with all of it. He hasn’t had the discussion with the consultant yet, but has been told they will advise active surveillance only at this point.

I guess my question is, whether anyone is in a similar boat, and particularly whether anyone has been in this boat for many years (i.e. if someone on here happened to tell me they’ve lived for 30 years with this type of cancer, that would be so nice to hear!)?

Just very worried and would appreciate some real life stories :)

Thank you, and happy new year to everyone! 

User
Posted 01 Jan 2022 at 10:25

Hello, 

Just posting as a close relative has been diagnosed with a Gleason 3+4 (grade group 2) prostate cancer, at age of 65. We’re trying to remain optimistic as we’ve been told the majority of the cancer is Gleason 3, with only a ‘little bit’ of Gleason 4, and the entire cancer volume at only 5% of the prostate gland. I’m finding myself trawling through research for peace of mind but it’s so easy to get bogged down with all of it. He hasn’t had the discussion with the consultant yet, but has been told they will advise active surveillance only at this point.

I guess my question is, whether anyone is in a similar boat, and particularly whether anyone has been in this boat for many years (i.e. if someone on here happened to tell me they’ve lived for 30 years with this type of cancer, that would be so nice to hear!)?

Just very worried and would appreciate some real life stories :)

Thank you, and happy new year to everyone! 

User
Posted 01 Jan 2022 at 15:38

Hi queryperson, a very reasonable question. We have lots of people on here. I couldn't give you exact figures but we have people who have been on AS for three to four years. This forum is biased towards people with problems so if you looked at the entire male population, you would find a lot more people who have been on AS for many years, but they have better things to do with their lives than post here.

If the cancer is not progressing it is better to leave it alone. The only reason for not doing AS is if it is clear that it is already severe and there is little time to waste.

If he can do AS for a year he will have a far better idea if his cancer will ever become a problem.

If he does need treatment it is very likely to be successful. I think he can look forward to dieing from something other than prostate cancer.

Dave

User
Posted 01 Jan 2022 at 15:54

If you're worried that the person concerned is going to die, put that thought out of your mind. Prostate cancer is just part of the ageing process for a man. Every man will develop prostate cancer if he lives long enough. Localised prostate cancer is an eminently treatable condition, and men who have undergone treatment go on to live a normal lifespan.

Best wishes,

Chris

Edited by member 01 Jan 2022 at 16:01  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 01 Jan 2022 at 17:49

I was diagnosed with prostate cancer in June this year and had a similar diagnosis to your relative i.e. category 2 (Gleason 3+4=7, with only 5% Gleason 4, the rest being Gleason 3). My PSA had increased from 3.58 in May 18, to 5.32 in March 21 and to 5.76 in April 21. This necessitated me  having an MRI scan in May that found a lesion on my prostate and that resulted me in having a biopsy in June that confirmed the cancer. At that time the cancer was only found in 3 of the 13 cores that were taken, all on the right side of the prostate. Because of those findings I decided to go on Active Surveillance, subject to a further review in 3 months.  Because a PSA test in September  showed that my PSA had increased to 6.01, I underwent a general anaesthetic biopsy ( the earlier one in June was a local anaesthetic) and this found that 15 of the 19 core samples were cancerous - still the same grading but the cancer was throughout my prostate. It is very, very unlikely that the cancer had increased during the time between the biopsies, just that the second biopsy had found more. Because of the increase in my PSA and the volume of cancer present (though still low grade) I decided to come off Active Surveillance and opt for surgery. This took place at Addenbrookes on 21/12/21. If interested, my cancer journey can be found under my thread.

As mentioned by Chris,  most men end up with prostate cancer and usually die of something else rather than of the cancer itself. It is reported that 1 in 5 men 40 and over have prostate cancer , that most men of 60 plus have it and that virtually all men over 80 have it. Another statistic is that a slow growing prostate cancer cell takes over 400 days to grow  and that a 1 cm lesion could well be over 40 years old.

 

Finally, since being diagnosed I have found that  several neighbours in my village and a number of  ex-work colleagues have over the years been diagnosed with prostate cancer and all are still alive 10 years later (one is celebrating 22 years after being diagnosed at age 61). They all though did eventually opt for treatment.

 

Ivan

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User
Posted 01 Jan 2022 at 15:38

Hi queryperson, a very reasonable question. We have lots of people on here. I couldn't give you exact figures but we have people who have been on AS for three to four years. This forum is biased towards people with problems so if you looked at the entire male population, you would find a lot more people who have been on AS for many years, but they have better things to do with their lives than post here.

If the cancer is not progressing it is better to leave it alone. The only reason for not doing AS is if it is clear that it is already severe and there is little time to waste.

If he can do AS for a year he will have a far better idea if his cancer will ever become a problem.

If he does need treatment it is very likely to be successful. I think he can look forward to dieing from something other than prostate cancer.

Dave

User
Posted 01 Jan 2022 at 15:54

If you're worried that the person concerned is going to die, put that thought out of your mind. Prostate cancer is just part of the ageing process for a man. Every man will develop prostate cancer if he lives long enough. Localised prostate cancer is an eminently treatable condition, and men who have undergone treatment go on to live a normal lifespan.

Best wishes,

Chris

Edited by member 01 Jan 2022 at 16:01  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 01 Jan 2022 at 17:38

Bear in mind that AS will involve further Biopsy in due course

User
Posted 01 Jan 2022 at 17:49

I was diagnosed with prostate cancer in June this year and had a similar diagnosis to your relative i.e. category 2 (Gleason 3+4=7, with only 5% Gleason 4, the rest being Gleason 3). My PSA had increased from 3.58 in May 18, to 5.32 in March 21 and to 5.76 in April 21. This necessitated me  having an MRI scan in May that found a lesion on my prostate and that resulted me in having a biopsy in June that confirmed the cancer. At that time the cancer was only found in 3 of the 13 cores that were taken, all on the right side of the prostate. Because of those findings I decided to go on Active Surveillance, subject to a further review in 3 months.  Because a PSA test in September  showed that my PSA had increased to 6.01, I underwent a general anaesthetic biopsy ( the earlier one in June was a local anaesthetic) and this found that 15 of the 19 core samples were cancerous - still the same grading but the cancer was throughout my prostate. It is very, very unlikely that the cancer had increased during the time between the biopsies, just that the second biopsy had found more. Because of the increase in my PSA and the volume of cancer present (though still low grade) I decided to come off Active Surveillance and opt for surgery. This took place at Addenbrookes on 21/12/21. If interested, my cancer journey can be found under my thread.

As mentioned by Chris,  most men end up with prostate cancer and usually die of something else rather than of the cancer itself. It is reported that 1 in 5 men 40 and over have prostate cancer , that most men of 60 plus have it and that virtually all men over 80 have it. Another statistic is that a slow growing prostate cancer cell takes over 400 days to grow  and that a 1 cm lesion could well be over 40 years old.

 

Finally, since being diagnosed I have found that  several neighbours in my village and a number of  ex-work colleagues have over the years been diagnosed with prostate cancer and all are still alive 10 years later (one is celebrating 22 years after being diagnosed at age 61). They all though did eventually opt for treatment.

 

Ivan

User
Posted 02 Jan 2022 at 00:43

You can't generalise from the particular in this game but I was in that situation, deferred treatment for 5 years and that was too long (in fairness the docs had got uneasy after a year and it sounds like yours are not). Your guy sounds a bit young (based on my one-patient experience) to deal with the mets that thing might throw off in the next x years, leaving them with - what - 30  less x years to grow. Just my 2c.

User
Posted 05 Jan 2022 at 05:59

I am not able to find the thread with your cancer journey can you send it

User
Posted 05 Jan 2022 at 08:42

Mistaken identity: will bung this post under my profile in due course.

Edited by member 05 Jan 2022 at 10:16  | Reason: misinterpreted post above

User
Posted 05 Jan 2022 at 09:10

Hi KJ82

 

If you are referring to my cancer journey, all you have to do is click on my name ( Oh Dear!) and then click on profile

 
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