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Cycling / Saddle Advice

User
Posted 07 Jan 2022 at 12:42

Hey everyone

I noticed on one thread that there were many dedicated cyclists actively posting in here, so I have a question for you all....

Is there a particular road riding saddle that is prostate friendly?

I'm been riding a Fizik for years which has always felt a little brutal, but it does look the biz.

My story is that I've been suffering bloody seamen for 12 months, and after an increased PSA and then an MRI a 1.4cm lesion was found, which after Trus biopsy has been confirmed to be non malignant.... not sure whats next as I've just got a letter stating urology are discharging me, but maybe this topic is for another thread....

I've been off the bike for 6 months because of all this, and now hoping to get back to it.

cheers

Jon 

Edited by member 07 Jan 2022 at 13:54  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 07 Jan 2022 at 21:02

I use a Specialized Sitero (well actually I have three of them on different bikes now).

https://www.tredz.co.uk/.Specialized-Sitero-Saddle_239268.htm

They're not cheap but have a huge perineal cutout and a chopped off nose to kind of force you to sit back on your sit bones.

Mind you I don't have a prostate any more, but I celebrated the anniversary of my RARP last year by riding a ton with clubmates and I did 7484 miles in 2021.

I'd probably be safe to try a 'regular saddle' again now, but I don't need or want to as things are working well so why change anything?

_____

Two cannibals named Ectomy and Prost, all alone on a Desert island.

Prost was the strongest, so Prost ate Ectomy.

User
Posted 10 Jan 2022 at 00:17

Originally Posted by: Online Community Member
Fair enough, although the excuse to buy a new bike would have been irresistable to many 😂

Hmm yes, I'm a bit attracted to the current idea of a dual purpose road/gravel bike, with the only significant difference being the extra width allowed in the frame for tyres up to 32. Other than that, same gearing, same weight, same bars. It would be good for touring in places where the roads aren't sealed ... plenty of that here in Aus.

It sounds as though a new bike might have saved you from cancer rather than causing it 😀.

Jules

 

 

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User
Posted 07 Jan 2022 at 14:28

Hi Jon,
most cycling retailers sell prostate friendly saddles now - we got John's from Wiggle - not this specific one but similar https://www.wiggle.co.uk/selle-italia-flite-flow-saddle-with-titanium-rails 

Cyclists Hub has an interesting article about why it helps and what to consider
https://www.cyclistshub.com/best-bike-saddles-for-prostate/ 

 

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

User
Posted 07 Jan 2022 at 15:58
I have one of these saddles. "Prostate friendly" and comfortable.

Selle SMP Trk Gel Saddle https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B00FFZ6GQM/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_glt_fabc_4ZSANBQ7T37A5D2DPV26

Best wishes,

Chris

User
Posted 07 Jan 2022 at 21:02

I use a Specialized Sitero (well actually I have three of them on different bikes now).

https://www.tredz.co.uk/.Specialized-Sitero-Saddle_239268.htm

They're not cheap but have a huge perineal cutout and a chopped off nose to kind of force you to sit back on your sit bones.

Mind you I don't have a prostate any more, but I celebrated the anniversary of my RARP last year by riding a ton with clubmates and I did 7484 miles in 2021.

I'd probably be safe to try a 'regular saddle' again now, but I don't need or want to as things are working well so why change anything?

_____

Two cannibals named Ectomy and Prost, all alone on a Desert island.

Prost was the strongest, so Prost ate Ectomy.

User
Posted 07 Jan 2022 at 22:17
Yes sorry - Alex is right. We got John's saddles from Tredz not Wiggle
"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

User
Posted 07 Jan 2022 at 23:46

I tried a Selle Italia, nose-less, well padded saddle with cut-out for a year but it transferred quite a lot of weight to my arms, which was not only tiring for the arms but also caused some numbness in my hands, so I'm back to the Fizik now. The prostate friendly saddles are certainly comfortable to sit on and possibly if your bike can be set up to reduce weight transfer forwards, they'd work very well.

Jules

User
Posted 08 Jan 2022 at 20:48

Originally Posted by: Online Community Member

I tried a Selle Italia, nose-less, well padded saddle with cut-out for a year but it transferred quite a lot of weight to my arms, which was not only tiring for the arms but also caused some numbness in my hands, so I'm back to the Fizik now. The prostate friendly saddles are certainly comfortable to sit on and possibly if your bike can be set up to reduce weight transfer forwards, they'd work very well.

It might have needed tilting up a little more at the front end or sliding further forward to reduce reach (or a combination).

_____

Two cannibals named Ectomy and Prost, all alone on a Desert island.

Prost was the strongest, so Prost ate Ectomy.

User
Posted 08 Jan 2022 at 21:10

I bought a couple of these noseless saddles for use during radiotherapy:
https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B07R61NZ4V/

That product is no longer available, but plenty of ones obviously coming out of the same Chinese factory.

Takes a few rides to get used to and adjust.

That was 2½ years ago. I found them sufficiently good that I've kept them on my bikes, and they have sparked the odd awareness talk.

As one of the links Lyn posted says, it's important that the saddle is an inch or two wider than the distance between your sit bones, so that you are supported by your pelvis, and not your perineum.

User
Posted 09 Jan 2022 at 20:59

Originally Posted by: Online Community Member

Originally Posted by: Online Community Member

I tried a Selle Italia, nose-less, well padded saddle with cut-out for a year but it transferred quite a lot of weight to my arms, which was not only tiring for the arms but also caused some numbness in my hands, so I'm back to the Fizik now. The prostate friendly saddles are certainly comfortable to sit on and possibly if your bike can be set up to reduce weight transfer forwards, they'd work very well.

It might have needed tilting up a little more at the front end or sliding further forward to reduce reach (or a combination).

Tilt wasn't going to do the job, though I did try various settings there. I also had it as far forward as possible but still suffered numb hands syndrome. I calculated the only way to solve the problem would have been a new bike with slightly different geometry but in the end I find the Fizik works better for me.

I've read various things about saddles and the prostate but so far as I can see the jury is still out and there's no proven link between "racing" saddles and prostate problems, specifically cancer.

Does anyone here have more information?

 

Jules

 

User
Posted 09 Jan 2022 at 22:21

Originally Posted by: Online Community Member

Tilt wasn't going to do the job, though I did try various settings there. I also had it as far forward as possible but still suffered numb hands syndrome. I calculated the only way to solve the problem would have been a new bike with slightly different geometry but in the end I find the Fizik works better for me.

Fair enough, although the excuse to buy a new bike would have been irresistable to many 😂

Originally Posted by: Online Community Member
I've read various things about saddles and the prostate but so far as I can see the jury is still out and there's no proven link between "racing" saddles and prostate problems, specifically cancer.

Does anyone here have more information?

I don't think cycling or saddles are a cause of cancer. That's a bit of a far-fetched notion, really. Pressing on an area of the body causing cell mutations at the DNA level? Nah - sounds a bit ridiculous to me. Soreness, or pain, sure. Cancer? Very doubtful.

The only link I know about between cycling and prostate cancer is the fact that a few months after buying my road bike and gradually moving further and further forward on the saddle I had such bad perineal pain that I couldn't ride for a week. During that time I decided to get a medical checkup including prostate examination (DRE) and PSA test as I'd just turned 50.

After the week off the bike, that pain issue never came back again, but I'd started the process with the GP and about 3 months later I had a diagnosis.

_____

Two cannibals named Ectomy and Prost, all alone on a Desert island.

Prost was the strongest, so Prost ate Ectomy.

User
Posted 10 Jan 2022 at 00:17

Originally Posted by: Online Community Member
Fair enough, although the excuse to buy a new bike would have been irresistable to many 😂

Hmm yes, I'm a bit attracted to the current idea of a dual purpose road/gravel bike, with the only significant difference being the extra width allowed in the frame for tyres up to 32. Other than that, same gearing, same weight, same bars. It would be good for touring in places where the roads aren't sealed ... plenty of that here in Aus.

It sounds as though a new bike might have saved you from cancer rather than causing it 😀.

Jules

 

 

User
Posted 10 Jan 2022 at 20:58
There has been research done across the EU and also by British Cycling. They found that professional cyclists have a higher ‘normal’ or baseline PSA but are at no increased risk of prostate cancer than other men. As a result of this research, guidance was issued by the BAUS that if a professional cyclist is referred with high PSA the urologist should consider carefully whether MRI and / or biopsy are necessary.

British Cycling was also involved in a bit of research that showed a period of intense cycling can raise the PSA by as much as 10% for between 1 - 4 hours.

The debate with saddles is really for men post-op … some urologists feel very strongly that cycling too soon post-RP can impede recovery of erectile function. Other urologists dispute this. John’s surgeon told him to stay off the bike for 6 months; when he groaned in horror the response was “what’s the point of me going to all the trouble to save your nerves if you aren’t going to do everything you can to help them heal?” J did stay off the bike until after the 6 month review and then I ordered prostate friendly saddles for his various bikes.

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

User
Posted 10 Jan 2022 at 22:34

Thanks again Lyn. Your collection of wisdom is a fantastic resource for all of us.

For those of us who had RT and not RP there would seem to be no reason for changing to a "prostate friendly" saddle, although they are a lot more comfy in some ways ☺️

I might have to check the possibilities again. Last time I looked, and purchased, I couldn't find anything that really impressed me.

On a totally irrelevant note, I tried out an old Brooks saddle I've had for about 50 years. They're so heavy they change the whole feel of a bike ... quite comfortable but they definitely have limitations.

Jules

User
Posted 11 Jan 2022 at 00:05
I am looking at a new bike for me but the choices are becoming more befuddling by the minute. What's the difference between a road bike & a gravel bike?
"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

User
Posted 11 Jan 2022 at 16:01
A road bike is what you'd perhaps think of as a "racing bike". Large wheels. Lightweight. Thin tyres at a very high pressure. Generally no suspension.

Off-road bikes are more strongly built and have smaller wheels and fatter tyres running at a lower pressure. They usually have suspension, either front-only (a "hard tail" bike) or both front and rear suspension.

Hope that helps!

Chris

User
Posted 11 Jan 2022 at 17:01
Thank you. I was okay with road bike, mountain bike and hybrid - it is 'gravel bike' that is throwing me as they look just like road bikes with the dropped handlebars when I am searching google! I have a mountain bike (with suspension .... never used) & hybrid (with cute basket for carrying baguettes & cheese) but was wobbling on the road v gravel. Having done a bit more research, it is a new road bike that I need.
"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

User
Posted 11 Jan 2022 at 21:12

Originally Posted by: Online Community Member
Thank you. I was okay with road bike, mountain bike and hybrid - it is 'gravel bike' that is throwing me as they look just like road bikes with the dropped handlebars when I am searching google! I have a mountain bike (with suspension .... never used) & hybrid (with cute basket for carrying baguettes & cheese) but was wobbling on the road v gravel. Having done a bit more research, it is a new road bike that I need.

 

A gravel bike is essentially a road bike with mountain bike tyres. To make it work they usually relax the shape a bit to make it more comfortable on less than perfect surfaces. Also there will be a lot more clearance on the frame for the wider wheels/tyres.

They're a lot of fun on gravel tracks and bridleways where you wouldn't dream of taking a road bike with slick tyres. Mine doesn't have any suspension, but the nice wide nobbly 38mm tyres at low pressure give a lot of comfort. The other nice thing about it is that I can swap the wheels over and it's a road bike. I use it now as my winter road bike to avoid winter muck and wear on my best bike.

In fact, if you could have just one bike, a gravel bike is pretty much the jack of all trades.

 

_____

Two cannibals named Ectomy and Prost, all alone on a Desert island.

Prost was the strongest, so Prost ate Ectomy.

User
Posted 11 Jan 2022 at 21:41

Originally Posted by: Online Community Member
Thank you. I was okay with road bike, mountain bike and hybrid - it is 'gravel bike' that is throwing me as they look just like road bikes with the dropped handlebars when I am searching google! I have a mountain bike (with suspension .... never used) & hybrid (with cute basket for carrying baguettes & cheese) but was wobbling on the road v gravel. Having done a bit more research, it is a new road bike that I need.

There's not much that could be added to Alex's post but if you're looking at road bikes Lyn you could choose something that leans towards "gravel" in having wider tyres [which require slightly wider rims]. My partner rides a road bike with 26mm tyres, rather than the classic 23mm which is what I'm still using. She could fit 28mm or even 32mm wide though that might get a bit too "pneumatic" if I can put it that way. This setup is on a road/racing bike which wasn't designed as a gravel bike but because of the space between the front forks and back suspension stays, allows a wider wheel/tyre to be fitted. That's a reasonably common part of many road bikes now.

Even the 26/28mm tyres are run at lower pressures than the 23mm so they are much more comfortable. As for speed ... insignificant difference for most of us and sometimes quicker on certain surfaces.

While road/racing bikes can look similar their levels of comfort vary hugely. An aluminium frame road bike with 23mm tyres @ 90-100lb pressure and stiff wheels can be a right pain in the back and everywhere else over distance but there are some really great bikes around now that are both comfortable and quick, without using suspension to achieve that result. Of course you can spend a fortune too.

Jules

Edited by member 11 Jan 2022 at 21:55  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 11 Jan 2022 at 22:00

Hi Lyn, the bike that suits me is a tourer, Dawes Galaxy in particular. Rack and panniers for carrying cheese, wine and baguettes. Tyres which can handle roads and bridleways, but are not so knobbly they sap all your energy when on a normal road.

Not the sort of bike, you dress up in lycra for, but excellent for going down the pub and then falling off on the way home because you're too drunk to ride (yes I know you can get done for being drunk in charge of a bike, but I only know one person who got done and it was a small fine) I think the magistrate viewed him as more a danger to himself than anyone else.

Just seen Jules post, I guess I may as well let you know my tyres are 32mm schwalbe marathons. Probably more information than you really wanted.

Dave

User
Posted 11 Jan 2022 at 22:49

Originally Posted by: Online Community Member
Dawes Galaxy in particular. Rack and panniers for carrying cheese, wine and baguettes. Tyres which can handle roads and bridleways, but are not so knobbly they sap all your energy when on a normal road.

....... but excellent for going down the pub and then falling off on the way home because you're too drunk to ride (yes I know you can get done for being drunk in charge of a bike, but I only know one person who got done and it was a small fine) I think the magistrate viewed him as more a danger to himself than anyone else.

👍 Choice of bike, all class Dave!

A neighbour of mine was notorious for riding his horse into town, 5 miles or so, and returning late at night and completely blind drunk with all navigation courtesy of the horse. Quite relaxing after a big night out I imagine.

Jules

User
Posted 11 Jan 2022 at 23:12

Wow - thanks guys 🤯🚴‍♀️

Mr Fuzzy, I am so sorry that your thread has taken off in an entirely unexpected direction - I hope you at least got the info you needed :-/

We also know someone who was done for drunk cycling on the way home from the rugby club! 

Edited by member 11 Jan 2022 at 23:14  | Reason: Not specified

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

User
Posted 19 Apr 2022 at 20:26

Thanks everyone for your replies.

For some reason I didn’t get any notifications  and then with everything that’s been going on I completely forgot that I posted. 

However, now finding and reading all of your comments has been great and much appreciated.

I had been road cycling religiously for the last decade, every weekend year round, but since my prostate issues I still haven’t ridden since last September. 

Since first posting I’ve had an mri with pirads of 3, and a trus biopsy that was benign. Psa has been rising though and I still have various symptoms (bloody seamen, pains in testicles and groin, frequent needing to urinate).

I’m waiting on an MRA appointment now.

I’d really like to get back out on the bike but because it all feels inconclusive I’m scared to, as I want to support healing as much as possible. I’ve had all this going on for nearly 2 years now.

 

 

Edited by member 19 Apr 2022 at 20:27  | Reason: Not specified

 
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