I'm interested in conversations about and I want to talk about
Know exactly what you want?
Show search

Notification

Error

My PC Experience

User
Posted 06 May 2023 at 13:34

Age 57, PSA 4.5 & 3.8 on follow up, Gleason 7 (3+4) 5/7 cores LHS positive RHS benign, Grade 2. MRI PIRADS 4 - capsule intact, normal appearance of seminal vesicles, no lymph involvement T2A No, no bone abnormality.

Firstly I want to thank everyone on here. Their contributions and especially peoples stories/ experience have been of great help and comfort to me during what has and remains a difficult and confusing time. I thought that I should reciprocate and share my experiences and thoughts in case they help someone. Apologies for the length of this.

In early November 2022 I mentioned to the nurse practitioner at my GP during my annual health MOT should I get tested for PC due to age even though I had no symptoms. She ran through my risk profile and family history and suggested I should get tested. My mum died of breast cancer and I now understand this is a contributory factor in the risk profile. A few days after the test the surgery rang and advised I make an appointment with the GP. At the appointment he undertook a DE, which he advised was clear and explained my blood test showed a PSA of 4.5 just above the suggested level. On account of family history and PSA he referred me for an MRI scan, which was done just before Christmas. 

In early January I received a call from the urology dept. at the new Royal Liverpool Hospital (RLH) advising I had been referred there and an appointment was made for a couple of days later to discuss MRI results. At this appointment I was advised the MRI had picked up something but was inconclusive and a follow up biopsy was advised. After being told the possible side effects I agreed and this was arranged for a couple of weeks later.

I have read peoples experiences of the biopsy and I was concerned. It is not the most pleasant of experiences but I found it uncomfortable rather than painful. It was quite surreal making small talk with 4 strangers with your legs in stirrups! It was no worse than a trip to the dentist and at least you can talk during the procedure unlike at a dentist when you have your mouth open. It took me a couple of hours afterwards before the nurse was satisfied I was passing water sufficiently before letting me go home. I worked from home the next day just in case but I was in no great discomfort and other than blood in the urine for a few days had no long lasting effects.

At the follow up appointment on 13 February I was given the news I was half expecting - I had PC. Whilst a shock I was relived that it had been identified early and could be treated. I work in property and if there is a problem in a building you deal with it - I took the same attitude with my body. My body is a temple (not sure of what 'Doom' perhaps!) and needs sorting. My wife who was with me was shocked. The Dr explained the prognosis - I was low to intermediary risk, it appeared to have caught early was treatable and at this stage my life outcomes were positive. He then passed me over to one of the nurses who explained the options:

1) Active surveillance - not recommended.  She advised I was young and fit and better able to cope with treatment now. I did question her medical competence at that point as it is a long time since I have been described as that! She explained in the world of PC I was and it was not unusual for them to be dealing with people with a PSA levels significantly above mine.

2) Surgery - explained with all the side effects

3) Radiotherapy - again explained with side effects

4) Brachytherapy - this was explained but not pushed.

Other alternatives HIFU and Proton Beam treatment were mentioned but these would require a trip to London

Appointments were arranged to meet the surgeon and oncologist a couple of weeks later to discuss the options.

When we got home I told my grown up children. I was surprised at how shocked my son was and how badly he took it. I had to explain it was treatable and should not affect anything long term. We have had friends and family who had suffered badly with cancer and I suspect he was thinking of their experiences. My daughter who is a nurse was more positive and interested in the medical side.

After a couple of days of reflection I decided to be open and tell people. Colleagues in work were shocked and supportive.

After meeting with the surgeon and oncologist on 24 February I decided to go with surgery. Interestingly the oncologist when asked advised I should go with surgery as I was 'young and healthy' (again!) and there was a back up of radiology in the future if required. A date for surgery was set for 24 April with instructions to get as fit as possible and lose 6kg (1 stone). 

With 2 months to prepare I set about using my remaining holidays (walking in Lakes) enjoying myself and booking concerts, seeing films etc and preparing work for my absence as well as losing weight. I went on the 3B diet (no booze, no bread, no biscuits!) and 'cheated' by getting low calorie 'ping' meals. I found gym kitchen to be the best. On the surgeons advice we also cancelled an island hopping trip around the Greek Islands booked for early June as it was unlikely I would be able to enjoy the trip due to possible side effects and strains (we were going 7 weeks post surgery). There was no issue with cancelling and insurance covered it.

Just before Easter the hospital rang and my surgery had been bought forward to 12 April. Due to the Junior Doctors strike the surgeon had rearranged so the simpler surgery which did not require Junior Doctor support was swapped with more complex cases which required the presence of junior doctors. Not sure how I felt about that! Cue panic to change arrangements, sort out work and prepare myself.

I turned up at the hospital on 12 April in the knowledge I was the fittest and lightest I had been for many years (I lost 10kg) albeit with a poison inside of me and would be coming out feeling awful - not a nice thought. I was prepped and before I knew it I was waking up in recovery some 4 hours after going under feeling dozy. I was then moved to my  room.  The new RLH has all private rooms. I was tired and sore and required pain relief every few hours initially. During the night I was woken every couple of hours for obs to be taken so a very fitful nights sleep. In the morning the surgeon came and advised the surgery went well and the nerves on the right had been spared but he could not spare the ones on the left due to the location of the tumour. By 5PM I was ready to go home.

The first few days were painful. Limited mobility which made getting in and out of bed painful plus the fun of the catheter. After 4 days I was by passing and the hospital advised I was to come back in. They flushed me and a clot was discovered. I was sent home but was by passing again. I returned to hospital and they removed the catheter and replaced it (eye watering!). I was still by passing. They concluded I was having bladder spasms and sent me home with drugs and pads. Until the catheter was removed I was by passing so it was painful and wet. The last couple of days were especially painful and I wish I had asked for some gel to numb the pain

After 9 days I returned for the catheter to be removed. I flooded the place on removal and could not control myself. The nurses advised this was not unusual it would get better and sent me home with a supply of pads (level 2), instructions to do my pelvic floor exercises, prescription for a vacuum pump and sildenafil which I was to start taking (so far no effect!). The next couple of days were the lowest. I was soaking the pads and wetting myself day and night with no control. I ran out of pads and had to buy more. I had been referred to the bladder services team but due to the weekend it was a few days before they got in touch and eventually a fresh supply arrived (level 4). It did make me chuckle that there was no effort to disguise the boxes on delivery - all my neighbours now know! One of the benefits of being in Liverpool is they provide pads on prescription. Things began to improve and within 1 week of the catheter being removed I had gone from 9/10 pads in the days and getting wet to 3/4 pads a day and staying dry. 

Here I am 2 weeks after the catheter having been removed and just over 3 weeks post op. My mobility has improved. I no longer need pain relief. I did over do the other day with over 6,000 steps and felt it for a couple of days (it felt like I had a stitch) so I have reined back the walking to just 3/4,000 steps to the local coffee shop and back. I am less tired and have started getting back on line for work for a few hours each day more for my sanity as I am getting bored. For the 1st couple of weeks I was tired and could not be bothered even reading. Continence has improved but still a way to go as I can feel dribbles when walking and getting up from a chair etc despite trying to squeeze. Perhaps the biggest issue is my little 'fella' - he is smaller and they never warned about that. This leads to practical issues when peeing and dribbling onto my trousers. I need to review my technique! There is a still a way to go and I would have confidence issues about returning to work if continence does not improve. The improvements there seem to have plateaued for a few days possibly because I over did it? I have got he squeezy app and following the timetable religiously. I have also lost another 4kg. At this rate a new wardrobe will be required!

What next? My follow up with the surgeon is mid June so hopefully the PSA and results of the tests on the removed prostate are positive. I've also appointments with the bladder clinic in a couple of weeks so hopefully the continence has improved. I have been signed off for 8 weeks but depending on continence and how I feel I hope to get back to work and driving late May/early June. As for ED well that is the last thing I am worried about the moment. I have been told not to use the pump until after seeing the surgeon. So far the tablets are having no impact. I have other things to worry about (getting fit and continence) and my wife is very understanding.

Some thoughts on my experience to date

1) Be patient - everything takes time, waiting in waiting rooms, waiting for results/appointments, recovery etc.

2) Everyone is different - just because 'so and so' remained incontinent or was running marathons 3 weeks after surgery does not mean you will. It is like looking at trip advisor for hotels you generally ignore the more extreme reviews and focus on the average. So it should be for recovery from surgery - average is good.

3) The NHS - I cannot complain. From initial consultation in November 2022 to surgery in April 2023 seems like a positive to me. Perhaps I am lucky being in Liverpool where there is access to brand new facilities at Clatterbridge (for oncology) and the new RLH which has a specialist urology unit. The staff have been excellent. 

4) Tell people - I realise this may not be for everyone but with the greatest respect to the work Prostrate Cancer UK do nothing beats personal experience. I have been telling people to get tested and I know of at least 3 people who as a result of my experiences have gone to get tested who otherwise wouldn't (they're the ones who have told me)

5) Stay positive - this can be hard. I know. The 1st couple of weeks post surgery were difficult especially after the catheter was removed. It gets better. There are always people worse off than you. I have a friend who a couple of years ago was told to put their affairs in order as they had 6 months left (different cancer). He is now free from cancer after a really hard 2 years of treatment but he stayed positive and came through it after vowing to fight.

Finally I want to thank my family and especially my wife who has been very patient and understanding. She has helped me through this so far. Fingers crossed for the future

Thank you and I hope someone finds this helpful

 

User
Posted 12 Apr 2024 at 07:44

Today is the 1st anniversary of my op. It still seems like yesterday. How time flies when you are having fun!  I’m off to celebrate by going to aintree tomorrow for the National for the 1st time. I am very good at selecting donkeys so any tips gratefully received! 

An appropriate time to reflect on things

My outlook on life has changed. I’m 59 later this year and now seriously thinking about early retirement. I want to enjoy being retired and the last year has shown me not to take my health for granted. I don’t want to keep working only to then find my retirement is blighted by ill health from early on. That’s not something I would have thought about before. 

At this stage my prognosis is as good as I can hope for. Last 2 PSA tests <0.001 and clear margins in post surgery histology. My next appointment in July with the surgeon is a telephone one and in the nicest possible sense after that I hope I never talk to him or meet him again! I am realistic enough though to realise there could be a kick in the teeth (wrong body part - nuts is a better expression!) and a reoccurrence sometime later is a possibility hence my thoughts about early retirement. 

Physically health wise things are getting back to normal. I’m back at gym but wary of heavy weights as I feel a pull in the stomach when lifting. I’ve been checked for a suspected hernia and there was nothing - the advice was it’s things settling down. Since diagnosis I’ve lost and kept off around 15kg. Only downside is it’s cost a fortune in a new wardrobe!

Early on I had issues with continence or rather lack of it. Things have improved and I’m on 1 level 2 pad a day and thinking next delivery go to level 1. I’m lucky that where I live pads are supplied by the local health trust. I do need them. Some days I’m dry but others for no reason I’m quite wet. It’s not dominating my life like it used to and my only concession is I don’t use the communal showers and changing room at the gym. 

Now for the big one if you pardon the pun (I wish it was!). I was 50% nerve sparing and despite regular use of the pump and sildenafil not a sausage! I also wet myself when using the pump so not the most enticing prospect for my wife. I’m over 30 years married and my wife is post menopause. I’ve lost some of my libido as well. There are worse things in life. I keep trying and who knows. Secretly I suspect my wife thinks her prayers have been answered! 

In summary I am lucky I had an early diagnosis and treatment options which is what keeps me going.

Hope people find this summary useful in their own journey.

Thanks to all contributors on here. Even though I may not reply the conversations and advice are really useful.

I should also add I am in a support group which I find really useful and helpful. We have very open and honest conversations about subjects I would have not dreamt about discussing last year with strangers. I do suggest people consider joining a support group even if they think they are not struggling. You maybe surprised at what you get from it. 

 

User
Posted 06 May 2023 at 13:34

Age 57, PSA 4.5 & 3.8 on follow up, Gleason 7 (3+4) 5/7 cores LHS positive RHS benign, Grade 2. MRI PIRADS 4 - capsule intact, normal appearance of seminal vesicles, no lymph involvement T2A No, no bone abnormality.

Firstly I want to thank everyone on here. Their contributions and especially peoples stories/ experience have been of great help and comfort to me during what has and remains a difficult and confusing time. I thought that I should reciprocate and share my experiences and thoughts in case they help someone. Apologies for the length of this.

In early November 2022 I mentioned to the nurse practitioner at my GP during my annual health MOT should I get tested for PC due to age even though I had no symptoms. She ran through my risk profile and family history and suggested I should get tested. My mum died of breast cancer and I now understand this is a contributory factor in the risk profile. A few days after the test the surgery rang and advised I make an appointment with the GP. At the appointment he undertook a DE, which he advised was clear and explained my blood test showed a PSA of 4.5 just above the suggested level. On account of family history and PSA he referred me for an MRI scan, which was done just before Christmas. 

In early January I received a call from the urology dept. at the new Royal Liverpool Hospital (RLH) advising I had been referred there and an appointment was made for a couple of days later to discuss MRI results. At this appointment I was advised the MRI had picked up something but was inconclusive and a follow up biopsy was advised. After being told the possible side effects I agreed and this was arranged for a couple of weeks later.

I have read peoples experiences of the biopsy and I was concerned. It is not the most pleasant of experiences but I found it uncomfortable rather than painful. It was quite surreal making small talk with 4 strangers with your legs in stirrups! It was no worse than a trip to the dentist and at least you can talk during the procedure unlike at a dentist when you have your mouth open. It took me a couple of hours afterwards before the nurse was satisfied I was passing water sufficiently before letting me go home. I worked from home the next day just in case but I was in no great discomfort and other than blood in the urine for a few days had no long lasting effects.

At the follow up appointment on 13 February I was given the news I was half expecting - I had PC. Whilst a shock I was relived that it had been identified early and could be treated. I work in property and if there is a problem in a building you deal with it - I took the same attitude with my body. My body is a temple (not sure of what 'Doom' perhaps!) and needs sorting. My wife who was with me was shocked. The Dr explained the prognosis - I was low to intermediary risk, it appeared to have caught early was treatable and at this stage my life outcomes were positive. He then passed me over to one of the nurses who explained the options:

1) Active surveillance - not recommended.  She advised I was young and fit and better able to cope with treatment now. I did question her medical competence at that point as it is a long time since I have been described as that! She explained in the world of PC I was and it was not unusual for them to be dealing with people with a PSA levels significantly above mine.

2) Surgery - explained with all the side effects

3) Radiotherapy - again explained with side effects

4) Brachytherapy - this was explained but not pushed.

Other alternatives HIFU and Proton Beam treatment were mentioned but these would require a trip to London

Appointments were arranged to meet the surgeon and oncologist a couple of weeks later to discuss the options.

When we got home I told my grown up children. I was surprised at how shocked my son was and how badly he took it. I had to explain it was treatable and should not affect anything long term. We have had friends and family who had suffered badly with cancer and I suspect he was thinking of their experiences. My daughter who is a nurse was more positive and interested in the medical side.

After a couple of days of reflection I decided to be open and tell people. Colleagues in work were shocked and supportive.

After meeting with the surgeon and oncologist on 24 February I decided to go with surgery. Interestingly the oncologist when asked advised I should go with surgery as I was 'young and healthy' (again!) and there was a back up of radiology in the future if required. A date for surgery was set for 24 April with instructions to get as fit as possible and lose 6kg (1 stone). 

With 2 months to prepare I set about using my remaining holidays (walking in Lakes) enjoying myself and booking concerts, seeing films etc and preparing work for my absence as well as losing weight. I went on the 3B diet (no booze, no bread, no biscuits!) and 'cheated' by getting low calorie 'ping' meals. I found gym kitchen to be the best. On the surgeons advice we also cancelled an island hopping trip around the Greek Islands booked for early June as it was unlikely I would be able to enjoy the trip due to possible side effects and strains (we were going 7 weeks post surgery). There was no issue with cancelling and insurance covered it.

Just before Easter the hospital rang and my surgery had been bought forward to 12 April. Due to the Junior Doctors strike the surgeon had rearranged so the simpler surgery which did not require Junior Doctor support was swapped with more complex cases which required the presence of junior doctors. Not sure how I felt about that! Cue panic to change arrangements, sort out work and prepare myself.

I turned up at the hospital on 12 April in the knowledge I was the fittest and lightest I had been for many years (I lost 10kg) albeit with a poison inside of me and would be coming out feeling awful - not a nice thought. I was prepped and before I knew it I was waking up in recovery some 4 hours after going under feeling dozy. I was then moved to my  room.  The new RLH has all private rooms. I was tired and sore and required pain relief every few hours initially. During the night I was woken every couple of hours for obs to be taken so a very fitful nights sleep. In the morning the surgeon came and advised the surgery went well and the nerves on the right had been spared but he could not spare the ones on the left due to the location of the tumour. By 5PM I was ready to go home.

The first few days were painful. Limited mobility which made getting in and out of bed painful plus the fun of the catheter. After 4 days I was by passing and the hospital advised I was to come back in. They flushed me and a clot was discovered. I was sent home but was by passing again. I returned to hospital and they removed the catheter and replaced it (eye watering!). I was still by passing. They concluded I was having bladder spasms and sent me home with drugs and pads. Until the catheter was removed I was by passing so it was painful and wet. The last couple of days were especially painful and I wish I had asked for some gel to numb the pain

After 9 days I returned for the catheter to be removed. I flooded the place on removal and could not control myself. The nurses advised this was not unusual it would get better and sent me home with a supply of pads (level 2), instructions to do my pelvic floor exercises, prescription for a vacuum pump and sildenafil which I was to start taking (so far no effect!). The next couple of days were the lowest. I was soaking the pads and wetting myself day and night with no control. I ran out of pads and had to buy more. I had been referred to the bladder services team but due to the weekend it was a few days before they got in touch and eventually a fresh supply arrived (level 4). It did make me chuckle that there was no effort to disguise the boxes on delivery - all my neighbours now know! One of the benefits of being in Liverpool is they provide pads on prescription. Things began to improve and within 1 week of the catheter being removed I had gone from 9/10 pads in the days and getting wet to 3/4 pads a day and staying dry. 

Here I am 2 weeks after the catheter having been removed and just over 3 weeks post op. My mobility has improved. I no longer need pain relief. I did over do the other day with over 6,000 steps and felt it for a couple of days (it felt like I had a stitch) so I have reined back the walking to just 3/4,000 steps to the local coffee shop and back. I am less tired and have started getting back on line for work for a few hours each day more for my sanity as I am getting bored. For the 1st couple of weeks I was tired and could not be bothered even reading. Continence has improved but still a way to go as I can feel dribbles when walking and getting up from a chair etc despite trying to squeeze. Perhaps the biggest issue is my little 'fella' - he is smaller and they never warned about that. This leads to practical issues when peeing and dribbling onto my trousers. I need to review my technique! There is a still a way to go and I would have confidence issues about returning to work if continence does not improve. The improvements there seem to have plateaued for a few days possibly because I over did it? I have got he squeezy app and following the timetable religiously. I have also lost another 4kg. At this rate a new wardrobe will be required!

What next? My follow up with the surgeon is mid June so hopefully the PSA and results of the tests on the removed prostate are positive. I've also appointments with the bladder clinic in a couple of weeks so hopefully the continence has improved. I have been signed off for 8 weeks but depending on continence and how I feel I hope to get back to work and driving late May/early June. As for ED well that is the last thing I am worried about the moment. I have been told not to use the pump until after seeing the surgeon. So far the tablets are having no impact. I have other things to worry about (getting fit and continence) and my wife is very understanding.

Some thoughts on my experience to date

1) Be patient - everything takes time, waiting in waiting rooms, waiting for results/appointments, recovery etc.

2) Everyone is different - just because 'so and so' remained incontinent or was running marathons 3 weeks after surgery does not mean you will. It is like looking at trip advisor for hotels you generally ignore the more extreme reviews and focus on the average. So it should be for recovery from surgery - average is good.

3) The NHS - I cannot complain. From initial consultation in November 2022 to surgery in April 2023 seems like a positive to me. Perhaps I am lucky being in Liverpool where there is access to brand new facilities at Clatterbridge (for oncology) and the new RLH which has a specialist urology unit. The staff have been excellent. 

4) Tell people - I realise this may not be for everyone but with the greatest respect to the work Prostrate Cancer UK do nothing beats personal experience. I have been telling people to get tested and I know of at least 3 people who as a result of my experiences have gone to get tested who otherwise wouldn't (they're the ones who have told me)

5) Stay positive - this can be hard. I know. The 1st couple of weeks post surgery were difficult especially after the catheter was removed. It gets better. There are always people worse off than you. I have a friend who a couple of years ago was told to put their affairs in order as they had 6 months left (different cancer). He is now free from cancer after a really hard 2 years of treatment but he stayed positive and came through it after vowing to fight.

Finally I want to thank my family and especially my wife who has been very patient and understanding. She has helped me through this so far. Fingers crossed for the future

Thank you and I hope someone finds this helpful

 

User
Posted 02 Jan 2024 at 16:51

Firstly happy new year. I wish everyone who has tests procedures or results this year the best of luck. This time last year I had no idea I would be joining a club no one wants to be in! 

1st working day of the year (unless in Scotland!) and an early morning appointment with the surgeon for my 2nd follow up following surgery some 9 months ago. How time flies. I had a blood test before Christmas ahead of this appointment to check PSA levels and received a call a few days before Christmas from the surgeon to say the results were 0.001. That’s good ! He had called so I was not worrying over Christmas - a kind gesture. Next follow up in 6 months and a call only. 

Other things:

Physically back up to walking good distances but have a pulling sensation on the right side of the abdomen when lifting. The surgeon has sent me for a CT scan as there is a possible suspected hernia. This is frustrating as i thought I’d been careful. 

On the incontinence front things are improving of sorts. I’ve migrated to a level 2 tens pad one per day. But some days I’m wetter than others and there’s no pattern. Perhaps alcohol which I’ve reintroduced (only a little!) and the cold may not help. It is perhaps something I just have to live with going forward and accept it as part of life. The only impact so far it has are not using the communal changing rooms at the gym and probably unable to play cricket (the suspected hernia may stop that anyway). How I fare around a pool on holiday ? The surgeon did suggest surgery to resolve the issue but I think I can live with it and keep squeezing! 

In terms of ED that is a challenge. I was 50% nerve sparing. I have no natural reactions and when using silendafil I do occasionally get a reaction but then dribble! Keep pumping seems to be the answer! I have not yet tried rings - one for the future. TBH my libido has suffered and I suppose that’s in my head. Its not something I am stressing about at the moment as the physical fitness and incontinence is more important.

Everyone is different and their experiences vary some good some bad post op. I have no idea how I fit in but suspect average.

Whilst no one can compare experiences I hope people find my experiences useful and a possible benchmark.

I have no regrets over the op despite the side effects.  I consider myself lucky that the cancer was identified early and I had the option of treatment. I will always remember being told that there are guys in the waiting room who could not be treated and their condition could only be managed. A big difference. I realise it is early days and there could be a sting in the tail but touch wood I seem to have dodged a bullet.

Thanks to all contributors on here - their responses and experiences do help me. 

 

 

User
Posted 22 Jun 2023 at 11:11

Here I am 9 weeks post op (doesn't time fly when you are having fun!) and just had my post op follow up:

The Good

1. Results - PSA 0.001, clear margins, no evidence of spread and wounds healing well. This was as good an outcome as I could have expected. Whilst I realise there is still along way to go and a risk of reoccurrence I feel that but for the grace of god and luck that I have dodged a bullet.

2. Back to work - I returned to work after 7 weeks albeit reduced hours with my 'work wives' making sure I leave around 4PM! I am still tired at the end of the day but it has helped mentally by giving me a mental stimulation and distraction.

3. Driving - at 7 weeks I starting driving again. Initially short drives tired me out but I can now 30 minutes easily. I have not tried long distances yet. I have a 'wee bag' in the car for emergencies - wee bottle, change of clothes/ underwear, wet wipes, spare pads, plastic bag and towel (to cover myself if caught short in a traffic jam!). Hopefully I never need it.

4. Size - after the initial shock of having nothing things have returned to perhaps not quite their former glory (such as it was!) but at least I have something to hold and point whilst peeing.

5. Local Support Group - I ventured along to my local support group. I was very worthwhile being able to talk to other guys about their experiences. It was off putting as one of the guys who had his op 3 weeks after me was totally dry but I found it reassuring that there were guys who were getting on with their lives despite having a prognosis and treatment much worse than me. Very humbling and I really feel for them and their families. 

6. Weight loss - from when the surgeon in February told me to lose around 1 stone before my op I have now lost over 2 stone (I needed to!). I lost just under 1 stone in the 2 weeks post op. The downside is I have now had to buy new clothes and have the challenge of making sure I don't put weight back on! 

The Bad

1. ED - not as big an issue yet as I had thought probably because I have lost my libido (hopefully temporarily!) due to other factors. I was spared 50% nerves so not expecting miracles yet. I am on sildenafil 100mg every 2 days. It has a limited impact and occasionally I get a gentle soft twitch. If I woke my wife in the night and said 'look at this' proudly I would probably get a kick where it hurts with a comment of 'is that it' before she turned over! I have now been given the OK to start on the pump which I got on prescription. Fun times ahead!

2. Physical Fitness - this has been a struggle for me. Before the op I was in the gym, taking part in team sports and doing a lot of walking (Lakes, Wales, Dales etc). Things are improving gradually. At week 7 I could not walk 2 miles. Now I do that comfortably and 3 miles is achievable. I have found doing less but more often works better. I have pushed boundaries but reined back if too much and built up again before hitting new boundaries. Not yet ventured back to the gym. All gradual. I am really looking forward to getting out and about in the hills again - could be a way of yet though?

The Ugly

1. Incontinence - this was a shock and I have struggled with it. There have been times when I have had accidents and leaked. Things are improving and moving in the right direction. I have found improvements have been in steps over a week or so rather than a straight line. A few weeks ago I was 1/2 pads at night and 3/4 in the day. Now I am 1 at night mostly dry although I am getting up a couple of times in the night to go the loo ( I can hold myself!) and 2/1 during the day depending on activity level with a move over the last few days to just 1.  Pads are still Tena level 3. During the day I find I leak drops when moving around - getting in and out the car , chairs etc despite trying to squeeze. When walking I can find the pad is soaking on return without even knowing I'd leaked. One thing I found early on is to get underwear a size smaller than normal (briefs or slips) as it helps keeps the pads more secure.  Things are improving though.

2. Lack of Confidence - this has been my biggest issue and came as a surprise. It is not something I have seen mentioned before anywhere. I put it down to a combination of lack of physical fitness and stamina and continence issues. I have a reluctance to do anything - I've turned down opportunities for instance to see the Ashes at Lords and Old Trafford, the Open at Hoylake and important business presentations. At the last minute I have cancelled going out after accidents. At the moment I am reluctant to book a holiday or theatre/concert tickets. Irrational perhaps. Now that the side effects are improving and I'm back in work then my confidence should improve so I can look forward to booking things.

Reflection

Its been quite a journey and I feel very lucky that I have hopefully had a successful treatment. There is short term pain but hopefully that is for the longer term benefit of being able to look forward to getting on with my life and enjoying all the things I used to do. The key thing I have found is to be patient and remember everyone is different. There will be guys who recover well with no side effects but others will struggle. The vast majority probably like myself will be average which is good. Next to think about holidays. 

Apologies for the length of this. I hope someone finds it useful and an indicator of what happens post surgery. Thank you to all contributors on this forum. It has been very useful in helping me. 

User
Posted 02 Jan 2024 at 17:58

Thanks for your honest and detailed description of your experiences. I'm older than you (70 yesterday!) and long retired so getting back to work isn't an issue. I'm just 8 weeks post-op and am able to be reasonably active physically, eg a couple of 8 mile hill walks yesterday and on NYE, and have courageously lifted the odd case of wine over the festive period. Driving is fine but haven't attempted a long drive yet. Not yet started cycling again, which is my passion exercise-wise, but was clearly advised by my surgeon to wait until I'm at least 12 weeks post-op to give my internals time to heal. 

Incontinence, like your experience, is variable. However I've been lucky in that I've never needed more than a couple of Tena level 2 pads per day. Things seem to have plateaued at the moment, despite being fairly rigorous about doing pelvic floor exercises. Probably not helped by drinking too much over the last week or so, and having too many espressos. 

Nothing going on yet regarding erections - my vacuum pump appointment is later this week, and I've yet to start on viagra or similar.

I hope things continue to improve for you. 

User
Posted 12 Apr 2024 at 10:04

Originally Posted by: Online Community Member
When my daughter was younger she had a fantastic track record on the national.

My eldest son, Ben, was a year old in 1980. That year,  I numbered some Scrabble tiles and got him to pick one. He picked no 6. It was Ben Nevis. What a coincidence, I thought! I put a £1 EW on it it and it won by 20 lengths at 40/1. I bought him a packet of Farleys Rusks to celebrate.  I bought his mum a couple of bottles of wine,  and about 9 months later, he had a brother. 😁

Edited by member 12 Apr 2024 at 10:16  | Reason: Additional text

User
Posted 14 Apr 2024 at 07:09

After an excellent day at the National I can now safely say that surgery has not blunted my uncanny ability to select donkeys in races!!!

User
Posted 14 Apr 2024 at 10:34

I actually tried my own philosophy but standing at the bottom of the bed shouting, I am panda boy doesn’t have the same ring to it. πŸ˜‡

Show Most Thanked Posts
User
Posted 06 May 2023 at 18:09

Hi MGOR, It is very early days for both continence and erectile function. Some patients get these functions back quickly but for most of us it's the long game. I found regaining continence wasn't a linear improvement. It was a bit of three steps forward then one step back. Erectile function is even slower to come back. I wouldn't expect much response from the Sildenafil at this stage. I suspect they have given you a therapeutic dose (as opposed to an event does) to increase blood flow and repair nerve damage. A similar drug, Tadalafil is probably a better alternative for repairing nerves as it remains in your system for longer. The only problem is getting it prescribed can be a post code lottery. I hope you continue to improve.

User
Posted 06 May 2023 at 20:57
MGOR, it sounds like quite an eventful experience but not untypical. Prostate surgey is pretty major and it is easy to underestimate how long it takes to recover, particularly when things like continence have such a personal impact.

I hope that in a few weeks time you will be down to only one or two pads a day - which feels liberating, believe me - and at your age you have a very good chance of complete continence. Most people here experience slower recovery of erectile function, but with reasonable luck that will return too.

I have seen (from the outside) the new Royal in Liverpool and wondered what it is like, glad your experiences were positive.

User
Posted 07 May 2023 at 08:07
Chris / J-B thanks for your replies. The 1st 2 weeks post op were the hardest and since then there has been a gradual improvement. I was warned it would be difficult but in the absence of any previous experience of ops of any sort it was a shock. I am taking things day by day and trying not to set future targets/milestones to avoid disappointment. It will be what it it will be. My only disappointment is missing the madness of Eurovision when it descends on Liverpool this week and not be able to experience it first hand. The City Centre will be bouncing this week
User
Posted 09 May 2023 at 20:48
MGOR, as it happens we were in Liverpool Sunday and Monday (supporting our daughter, a student at the University who was playing in a concert). It all seemed pretty lively on Sunday, though much of that may have been a normal weekend night - we were around Bold Street at that point. Definitely a lot of Eurovision enthusiasm on the streets on Monday despite some rain, and we were pleased to meet some Ukrainians invited over for "their" contest.
User
Posted 09 May 2023 at 21:47

I’m tempted to go in to experience what is going to be a one off experience- short term enjoyment v long term pain of possible slower recovery. Hmmm….!!! Discretion maybe required. 

User
Posted 09 May 2023 at 22:09
Just do it and get a taxi home as soon as you feel overtired
"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

User
Posted 10 May 2023 at 13:17

I’m tempted as you’re only young once but went out for 2 small walks yesterday total 6,000steps and was knackered. I’m 4 weeks post op now and although the mind is now up to it (after 3 weeks of fuzz and mush!) the body clearly isn’t unfortunately. 

User
Posted 20 May 2023 at 17:41

So here I am 5 weeks post op and enjoying the sunshine but…

After about 3 weeks post op mentally I began to felt better. That feeling of being permanently jet lagged had lifted. I started to interact with work for a couple of hours a day albeit remotely and on limited matters as I felt it was helping me mentally. I was getting bored at home. After week 4 I was managing 3/4 hours a day but on my terms.

Mobility has also improved a lot - I can now easily put my shoes and socks on! No heavy lifting gardening or housework yet much to my wife’s annoyance. The novelty of me being off ill for her is definitely wearing off! 

After reining in the walking I stepped up (pardon the pun) again to 6,000 steps and then 8,000 steps. This week I upped things again and got to 12,000 steps on a few days but spread over 3 smaller walks. Today I’ve enjoyed the sunshine and had my longest single walk to date of approx 8,000 steps. In hindsight probably too much. 

The ED front is showing promise albeit limited. After a few rounds of silendfril I’ve begun to notice a tingling and tenderness at times. Nothing for my wife to get excited about or notice but something to build on when I can start using the pump once I’ve seen the surgeon (been told not to use it until then)

And now for the kicker the dreaded incontinence. After 3 weeks I had improved from 7/8 pads during the day and 2/3 at night to 2/3 in the day and at most 1 at night but not needing to change most nights. However in the last couple of days I feel that I’ve gone backwards during the day needing to change the pads back to 3/4 and they’re wetter. Today I’ve also experienced the pad leaking through for the 1st time in several weeks and I’ve had to change myself. At no time did I feel like I needed the toilet - I just leaked. I’ve perhaps overdone the work and walking. You try and improve your fitness at the expense of continence. What to do?

I am hoping start driving again and to go back to the office the bank holiday week on the basis of it’s going to hopefully be a gentle reintroduction being a 4 day week and 1/2 term so it maybe quieter. However after todays experience my confidence has taken a knock. I suppose I’ve a week to try and improve things again. These things seem to improve in steps and I’ve plateaued for a couple of weeks now. 

I have an appointment with the bladder clinic next week so that may give me some pointers and I’m also hoping to attend a local support groups monthly meeting as it’s walking distance from home. They may also help.

My surgeons appointment has been put back to week 9 post op so a few weeks before I can see what he’s got to say and get the outcomes of the surgery and follow up PSA test. A nervous wait.

I was feeling quite low earlier but then I came on here and reading other people’s accounts and the journey they have been on makes me realise I am lucky. In the scheme of things my issues are minor compared with theirs and I am humbled by their strength and perseverance.  Their stories have proven to be an inspiration to me and I thank them for taking the effort to put their experiences on here so people like me can benefit. It might be small comfort for them but they make a positive difference. 

What next - return to work if I can get my confidence back and await the outcome of the follow up with the surgeon. 

 

 

User
Posted 20 May 2023 at 17:57

Dont over do the exercise. Be patient. A number of chaps have said that their incontinence troubles worsened after exercise. This is not a sprint - its a marathon. You are in no hurry, take your time.

User
Posted 20 May 2023 at 18:14

Hi,

I'd agree you probably overdone the exercise I was the same my head wanted to get back to my long walks but my body said no way , I'm 15 weeks from surgery now and leakage right down to average 5mls per day ! My issue from the first day has been discomfort which I've seen 3 GPs and 2 consultants who dismiss it saying " your doing very well"

Anyway good luck take it easy and put your feet up in the sun if you can.

 

Vern

Vern.

User
Posted 24 May 2023 at 16:26

6 weeks today post op - mentally I’m feeling so much better. The mind is telling me to run (figuratively speaking!) but the body is letting down! I keep telling myself be patient as it’s only 6 weeks post op. I am getting worried though about returning to the office next week due to my continence issues which is also impacting on my confidence. Since probably over doing the walking last week I have pared things right back. I also had a pre arranged appointment with the bladder nurse which gave me some reassurance but things on the continence side seem to be sliding backwards. I knew I had not been drinking enough (only water - about 1 litre per day). On her advice I need to up consumption over a few weeks to 2 litres. I’ve started getting to 1.5 litres and it’s going straight through me with no control. Previously I was down to 2/3 pads a day but I’m now back up to 5/6 (level3 Tena). Is this normal or is it a case of being patient whilst my body adapts? My other thought is should I go for larger pads rather than the discrete version?  Not sure if that would make a difference and if they’re noticeably different. I suspect the answer is be patient. I’ve not got anything to compare against or know anyone whose had similar experience so I’m in the dark on this. Thanks

User
Posted 02 Jun 2023 at 15:42

Six weeks out I wouldn't worry too much just take loads of pads with you and do a lot of swopping of pads. I found that the whole continence thing was very much a case to two forward and one back sometimes one forward and two back, then three forward and you get the drift it wasn't a linear or even smooth curve.

At nine and a bit months in I'll use one level 2 per 24hours but that's a security thing somedays I didn't really need it at all while others reveal I certainly did need it on change over. But as everyone keeps saying everybody's different not that that really helps Like you I wish I'd had more comparative data. No only on this issue but everything else. So at least I'd have had some kind of 'howgozit' curve to work from...

All that said, I'm about to start the SRT part of Hormones plus SRT so I'm expecting to take a few steps back when the nuking starts...

Edited by member 02 Jun 2023 at 15:45  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 22 Jun 2023 at 11:11

Here I am 9 weeks post op (doesn't time fly when you are having fun!) and just had my post op follow up:

The Good

1. Results - PSA 0.001, clear margins, no evidence of spread and wounds healing well. This was as good an outcome as I could have expected. Whilst I realise there is still along way to go and a risk of reoccurrence I feel that but for the grace of god and luck that I have dodged a bullet.

2. Back to work - I returned to work after 7 weeks albeit reduced hours with my 'work wives' making sure I leave around 4PM! I am still tired at the end of the day but it has helped mentally by giving me a mental stimulation and distraction.

3. Driving - at 7 weeks I starting driving again. Initially short drives tired me out but I can now 30 minutes easily. I have not tried long distances yet. I have a 'wee bag' in the car for emergencies - wee bottle, change of clothes/ underwear, wet wipes, spare pads, plastic bag and towel (to cover myself if caught short in a traffic jam!). Hopefully I never need it.

4. Size - after the initial shock of having nothing things have returned to perhaps not quite their former glory (such as it was!) but at least I have something to hold and point whilst peeing.

5. Local Support Group - I ventured along to my local support group. I was very worthwhile being able to talk to other guys about their experiences. It was off putting as one of the guys who had his op 3 weeks after me was totally dry but I found it reassuring that there were guys who were getting on with their lives despite having a prognosis and treatment much worse than me. Very humbling and I really feel for them and their families. 

6. Weight loss - from when the surgeon in February told me to lose around 1 stone before my op I have now lost over 2 stone (I needed to!). I lost just under 1 stone in the 2 weeks post op. The downside is I have now had to buy new clothes and have the challenge of making sure I don't put weight back on! 

The Bad

1. ED - not as big an issue yet as I had thought probably because I have lost my libido (hopefully temporarily!) due to other factors. I was spared 50% nerves so not expecting miracles yet. I am on sildenafil 100mg every 2 days. It has a limited impact and occasionally I get a gentle soft twitch. If I woke my wife in the night and said 'look at this' proudly I would probably get a kick where it hurts with a comment of 'is that it' before she turned over! I have now been given the OK to start on the pump which I got on prescription. Fun times ahead!

2. Physical Fitness - this has been a struggle for me. Before the op I was in the gym, taking part in team sports and doing a lot of walking (Lakes, Wales, Dales etc). Things are improving gradually. At week 7 I could not walk 2 miles. Now I do that comfortably and 3 miles is achievable. I have found doing less but more often works better. I have pushed boundaries but reined back if too much and built up again before hitting new boundaries. Not yet ventured back to the gym. All gradual. I am really looking forward to getting out and about in the hills again - could be a way of yet though?

The Ugly

1. Incontinence - this was a shock and I have struggled with it. There have been times when I have had accidents and leaked. Things are improving and moving in the right direction. I have found improvements have been in steps over a week or so rather than a straight line. A few weeks ago I was 1/2 pads at night and 3/4 in the day. Now I am 1 at night mostly dry although I am getting up a couple of times in the night to go the loo ( I can hold myself!) and 2/1 during the day depending on activity level with a move over the last few days to just 1.  Pads are still Tena level 3. During the day I find I leak drops when moving around - getting in and out the car , chairs etc despite trying to squeeze. When walking I can find the pad is soaking on return without even knowing I'd leaked. One thing I found early on is to get underwear a size smaller than normal (briefs or slips) as it helps keeps the pads more secure.  Things are improving though.

2. Lack of Confidence - this has been my biggest issue and came as a surprise. It is not something I have seen mentioned before anywhere. I put it down to a combination of lack of physical fitness and stamina and continence issues. I have a reluctance to do anything - I've turned down opportunities for instance to see the Ashes at Lords and Old Trafford, the Open at Hoylake and important business presentations. At the last minute I have cancelled going out after accidents. At the moment I am reluctant to book a holiday or theatre/concert tickets. Irrational perhaps. Now that the side effects are improving and I'm back in work then my confidence should improve so I can look forward to booking things.

Reflection

Its been quite a journey and I feel very lucky that I have hopefully had a successful treatment. There is short term pain but hopefully that is for the longer term benefit of being able to look forward to getting on with my life and enjoying all the things I used to do. The key thing I have found is to be patient and remember everyone is different. There will be guys who recover well with no side effects but others will struggle. The vast majority probably like myself will be average which is good. Next to think about holidays. 

Apologies for the length of this. I hope someone finds it useful and an indicator of what happens post surgery. Thank you to all contributors on this forum. It has been very useful in helping me. 

User
Posted 02 Jan 2024 at 16:51

Firstly happy new year. I wish everyone who has tests procedures or results this year the best of luck. This time last year I had no idea I would be joining a club no one wants to be in! 

1st working day of the year (unless in Scotland!) and an early morning appointment with the surgeon for my 2nd follow up following surgery some 9 months ago. How time flies. I had a blood test before Christmas ahead of this appointment to check PSA levels and received a call a few days before Christmas from the surgeon to say the results were 0.001. That’s good ! He had called so I was not worrying over Christmas - a kind gesture. Next follow up in 6 months and a call only. 

Other things:

Physically back up to walking good distances but have a pulling sensation on the right side of the abdomen when lifting. The surgeon has sent me for a CT scan as there is a possible suspected hernia. This is frustrating as i thought I’d been careful. 

On the incontinence front things are improving of sorts. I’ve migrated to a level 2 tens pad one per day. But some days I’m wetter than others and there’s no pattern. Perhaps alcohol which I’ve reintroduced (only a little!) and the cold may not help. It is perhaps something I just have to live with going forward and accept it as part of life. The only impact so far it has are not using the communal changing rooms at the gym and probably unable to play cricket (the suspected hernia may stop that anyway). How I fare around a pool on holiday ? The surgeon did suggest surgery to resolve the issue but I think I can live with it and keep squeezing! 

In terms of ED that is a challenge. I was 50% nerve sparing. I have no natural reactions and when using silendafil I do occasionally get a reaction but then dribble! Keep pumping seems to be the answer! I have not yet tried rings - one for the future. TBH my libido has suffered and I suppose that’s in my head. Its not something I am stressing about at the moment as the physical fitness and incontinence is more important.

Everyone is different and their experiences vary some good some bad post op. I have no idea how I fit in but suspect average.

Whilst no one can compare experiences I hope people find my experiences useful and a possible benchmark.

I have no regrets over the op despite the side effects.  I consider myself lucky that the cancer was identified early and I had the option of treatment. I will always remember being told that there are guys in the waiting room who could not be treated and their condition could only be managed. A big difference. I realise it is early days and there could be a sting in the tail but touch wood I seem to have dodged a bullet.

Thanks to all contributors on here - their responses and experiences do help me. 

 

 

User
Posted 02 Jan 2024 at 17:58

Thanks for your honest and detailed description of your experiences. I'm older than you (70 yesterday!) and long retired so getting back to work isn't an issue. I'm just 8 weeks post-op and am able to be reasonably active physically, eg a couple of 8 mile hill walks yesterday and on NYE, and have courageously lifted the odd case of wine over the festive period. Driving is fine but haven't attempted a long drive yet. Not yet started cycling again, which is my passion exercise-wise, but was clearly advised by my surgeon to wait until I'm at least 12 weeks post-op to give my internals time to heal. 

Incontinence, like your experience, is variable. However I've been lucky in that I've never needed more than a couple of Tena level 2 pads per day. Things seem to have plateaued at the moment, despite being fairly rigorous about doing pelvic floor exercises. Probably not helped by drinking too much over the last week or so, and having too many espressos. 

Nothing going on yet regarding erections - my vacuum pump appointment is later this week, and I've yet to start on viagra or similar.

I hope things continue to improve for you. 

User
Posted 03 Jan 2024 at 07:12

Thanks for your comments - it takes a lot of courage to lift cases of wine ! I found that my incontinence improved in steps so fingers crossed. One thing I’ve learnt is be patient and take it easy on doing anything. Time is a healer. Good luck.

User
Posted 03 Jan 2024 at 11:02

Good to hear about your progress MGOR, even though I’m on the HT/RT route(not through choice) it’s good to hear that you are happy with the outcome. I will be too in 18 months time if when I come off this HT, my PSA remains stable.

Onwards, Downwards(PSA🀞) and Upwards(Keep pumping🀣🀣)

Derek

User
Posted 03 Jan 2024 at 20:42
Aoxom-palindrome, you are doing impressively well with 8 mile walks at 8 weeks. I am sure you will soon be back cycling, with an appropriate saddle.

MGOR, getting by with one level 2 pad seems OK. It seems to be the way it is that leakage varies. For me (also 50% nerve sparing) 9 months was the point when erectile function finally began to reappear, fingers crossed it will be the same for you.

User
Posted 05 Jan 2024 at 07:17

J-B reassuring to know there’s hope and I may improve naturally. That maybe enough to shock my wife into a migraine - funny enough she has not had one now for over 9 months! Can’t detect a link there??!! 

User
Posted 12 Apr 2024 at 07:44

Today is the 1st anniversary of my op. It still seems like yesterday. How time flies when you are having fun!  I’m off to celebrate by going to aintree tomorrow for the National for the 1st time. I am very good at selecting donkeys so any tips gratefully received! 

An appropriate time to reflect on things

My outlook on life has changed. I’m 59 later this year and now seriously thinking about early retirement. I want to enjoy being retired and the last year has shown me not to take my health for granted. I don’t want to keep working only to then find my retirement is blighted by ill health from early on. That’s not something I would have thought about before. 

At this stage my prognosis is as good as I can hope for. Last 2 PSA tests <0.001 and clear margins in post surgery histology. My next appointment in July with the surgeon is a telephone one and in the nicest possible sense after that I hope I never talk to him or meet him again! I am realistic enough though to realise there could be a kick in the teeth (wrong body part - nuts is a better expression!) and a reoccurrence sometime later is a possibility hence my thoughts about early retirement. 

Physically health wise things are getting back to normal. I’m back at gym but wary of heavy weights as I feel a pull in the stomach when lifting. I’ve been checked for a suspected hernia and there was nothing - the advice was it’s things settling down. Since diagnosis I’ve lost and kept off around 15kg. Only downside is it’s cost a fortune in a new wardrobe!

Early on I had issues with continence or rather lack of it. Things have improved and I’m on 1 level 2 pad a day and thinking next delivery go to level 1. I’m lucky that where I live pads are supplied by the local health trust. I do need them. Some days I’m dry but others for no reason I’m quite wet. It’s not dominating my life like it used to and my only concession is I don’t use the communal showers and changing room at the gym. 

Now for the big one if you pardon the pun (I wish it was!). I was 50% nerve sparing and despite regular use of the pump and sildenafil not a sausage! I also wet myself when using the pump so not the most enticing prospect for my wife. I’m over 30 years married and my wife is post menopause. I’ve lost some of my libido as well. There are worse things in life. I keep trying and who knows. Secretly I suspect my wife thinks her prayers have been answered! 

In summary I am lucky I had an early diagnosis and treatment options which is what keeps me going.

Hope people find this summary useful in their own journey.

Thanks to all contributors on here. Even though I may not reply the conversations and advice are really useful.

I should also add I am in a support group which I find really useful and helpful. We have very open and honest conversations about subjects I would have not dreamt about discussing last year with strangers. I do suggest people consider joining a support group even if they think they are not struggling. You maybe surprised at what you get from it. 

 

User
Posted 12 Apr 2024 at 08:52

Hello mate.

Thank you very much for the update. We are in a very similar position, I'm about 2 months in front of your had the op Feb 2023.

I'm surprised, as I've become a full time addict of this site 😁, that I somehow haven't commented on your thread.

I posted a similar conversation a year post op. Heres a link :

 https://community.prostatecanceruk.org/posts/t30214-Almost-a-year-on-after-RARP

I'm very pleased to see your recovery is still improving and we're obviously very lucky to both have undetectable PSA, long may it continue.

I seemed to have fared a little better re incontinence, but after my op the surgeon actually commented on how very well the bladder part had gone. Regarding ED I've had to resort to Inivicorp which is very good and now very reliable. I would highly recommend it. Have you had an ED clinic appointment?

I'm envious of your weight loss, I've put on a few pounds.

As for the National. I've loved horse racing all my life. When I was only 16 years old, I was working in the bookies ' chalking the boards' at that time you couldn't see more then a yard in front of you due to the smoke!

What I've learned about racing is you rarely win and you"re as likely to pick a winner purely by a name, number, or colour of the silks, than you are studying form of relying on a tipster.

Best of luck to you in life and at Aintree.

Late edit. I've just checked the runners and riders for tomorrow. There are a couple of names that could be associated with our disease. Meetingofthewaters (incontinence 😁) about 8/1 and Chemical Energy (my Invicorp jabs 😁) about 33/1. I see you're a keen walker, so Corach Rambler who's about 6/1 favourite maybe another option?

Edited by member 12 Apr 2024 at 09:12  | Reason: Late edit

User
Posted 12 Apr 2024 at 09:35

Thanks. So true about the National. When my daughter was younger she had a fantastic track record on the national. Invariably got a couple placed each year and one year managed a 1234. Not that she won much at a £1 each way! She chose solely on name and colour! She lost interest and the ‘knack’ after she was about 12. The joy of the innocence of youth. Those tips of yours are probabaly as good as anyone’s! 

I’ve mentioned invicorp to my wife but it got a lukewarm response. It’s not something I’m pushing at the moment as I’m not there yet either as I want to get my continence improved. 

Weight loss was down to the misery no 3 b diet - no booze biscuits or bread! Worked wonders for me. I’ve introduced them again but as a treat by exception rather than the norm. 

Let’s see how those tips go tomorrow! 

User
Posted 12 Apr 2024 at 10:04

Originally Posted by: Online Community Member
When my daughter was younger she had a fantastic track record on the national.

My eldest son, Ben, was a year old in 1980. That year,  I numbered some Scrabble tiles and got him to pick one. He picked no 6. It was Ben Nevis. What a coincidence, I thought! I put a £1 EW on it it and it won by 20 lengths at 40/1. I bought him a packet of Farleys Rusks to celebrate.  I bought his mum a couple of bottles of wine,  and about 9 months later, he had a brother. 😁

Edited by member 12 Apr 2024 at 10:16  | Reason: Additional text

User
Posted 14 Apr 2024 at 07:09

After an excellent day at the National I can now safely say that surgery has not blunted my uncanny ability to select donkeys in races!!!

User
Posted 14 Apr 2024 at 08:32

πŸ˜‚ Me too mate, me too. πŸ˜‚

My best selection Corach Rambler, fell at the first. It obviously didn't fancy a 4 mile ramble yesterday afternoon.

 

Edited by member 14 Apr 2024 at 09:02  | Reason: Typo

User
Posted 14 Apr 2024 at 09:09
MGOR.

Glad you had a good day at the national, when picking your horses you should have studied between the lines & looked forward to the day that you are proudly STANDing at the bottom of the bed shouting I AM MAXIMUS.

All the best Jeff.

User
Posted 14 Apr 2024 at 09:36

To add insult to injury my wife had said pick I am maximus as it’s her favourite film. She took great delight in pointing out it was proof that I always ignore her! 

Edited by member 14 Apr 2024 at 09:37  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 14 Apr 2024 at 10:17

Originally Posted by: Online Community Member
you should have studied between the lines & looked forward to the day that you are proudly STANDing at the bottom of the bed shouting I AM MAXIMUS

Or, as in my case, had they'd been a runner called  Wee Willy. πŸ™„

 

Edited by member 14 Apr 2024 at 10:54  | Reason: Typo

User
Posted 14 Apr 2024 at 10:34

I actually tried my own philosophy but standing at the bottom of the bed shouting, I am panda boy doesn’t have the same ring to it. πŸ˜‡

 
Forum Jump  
©2024 Prostate Cancer UK