I'm interested in conversations about and I want to talk about
Know exactly what you want?
Show search

Notification

Error
<123>

I am a reluctant newby here

User
Posted 14 Jan 2015 at 20:43

Hi Kevin,

It sounds all good so far congratulations on the psa result that's brilliant news. You are doing tremendously well keep going forward.

BFN

Julie X

NEVER LAUGH AT A LIVE DRAGON
User
Posted 19 Jan 2015 at 15:54
Hi, questions for the forum if anyone knows.

1st dose of docetaxl last Tuesday. Feel generally ok, managed to run 7 k and 5 k no problem , took it easy on purpose but...

1) I have painful feet, hurt at night on the soles

2) my tongue has turned black

3) I have a very sore throat

Saw my GP today who signed me off work for 3 months which is good and said the above.

He said sore throat just get on with it, tongue is usual in chemo ( I did frozen pineapple) but I have not read this side affect anywhere, anyone else had it but painful feet said my be a problem, said my body may not like Docetaxel ( really! Lol ) so should see my consultant onco who luckily I am seeing tomorrow however anyone else hd this experience?

Thanks Kev

Ps any other ideas/ suggestions on anything always welcome

Dream like you have forever, live like you only have today Avatar is me racing in the Sahara April 2018

User
Posted 19 Jan 2015 at 15:58
We havecavfriend that has just completed his chemo and his tongue turned dark green and everything tasted vile.
User
Posted 19 Jan 2015 at 17:55

Think I've read that sore feet can happen with the Taxols. Using skin treatments such as Palmers cocoa butter might help.

Tongue & throat sound like reactions & they may play with the steroids to help you.

 

User
Posted 19 Jan 2015 at 18:12
Kev bit of info here. It mentions something in this link about numb and or tingling hands or feet and also soreness to the soles of the feet. Just go on the link and scroll down

Hope u feeling ok

bri

https://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&ei=Pki9VPa2LIvlUor0gagO&url=http://m.macmillan.org.uk/article/name/cancerinformation-cancertreatment-treatmenttypes-chemotherapy-individualdrugs-docetaxel&ved=0CB0QFjAA&usg=AFQjCNGeKh9vwu9tmlyBRxCzPBKFnGO5iQ

Edited by member 19 Jan 2015 at 18:19  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 19 Jan 2015 at 19:52
Kev

Mick had tingly hands and feet at times during chemo, he did not have the black tongue thing but that is a very common side effect of 2 groups of drugs that I know of, one is certain antibiotics and the other is from drugs containing Bismuth (commonly used in indigestion/acid reduction treatments)

Anti biotics are often given with chemo as a preventative measure so if you were given these it may be them not the Docatexel itself. Definitely worth checking with your Oncologist tomorrow as he may be able to change that about a bit.

I believe it is caused when drugs iterfere with the naturally formed bacteria in the mouth and can produce changes in clolour from greeny brown to black and a furry sort of feel to the tongue. I am also fairly sure it is harmless just a bit weird and should fade in between treatments and go completely at the end of treatment.

Good luck tomorrow

xx

Mandy Mo

User
Posted 19 Jan 2015 at 20:18

Hi Kev,

So you had Chemo and so far have run 12 K, well if i had done that i would have sore feet and sore knees as i would have been crawling home.

Black tongue, yep i have just eaten a bag of Thornton liquorice toffee and you know what my tongue is black.

Sore throat, loads of bugs going around, if i stubbed my toe it was all cancer, shut my finger in the car door it was cancer.

You are doing great my friend, when you messaged me to say you was hoping to come to Newark i said to the wife he has Chemo on Tuesday and we are meeting on that Saturday, no chance. You know what i think you will be there, probably you will run there with your wife in a trailer (because she does like a wine http://community.prostatecanceruk.org/editors/tiny_mce/plugins/emoticons/img/smiley-laughing.gif)

When i look back at my first Chemo and how i felt you are doing just fine, 12k, 12 bloody K.http://community.prostatecanceruk.org/editors/tiny_mce/plugins/emoticons/img/smiley-laughing.gif

Ring anytime

Si      

Don't deny the diagnosis; try to defy the verdict
User
Posted 22 Jan 2015 at 00:12
Saw doc yesterday following 1 St week of chemo, felt alright but he said my white blood cells dangerously low at 1.4 so has put me on Zarzio injections for 5 days. Had the first two and now have excruciating lower back and hip pain in massive spasms every second. Been going on for about 2 hours, phoned emergency number, sister said she would call back in 10 minutes an hour ago, effin h I am in absolute agony. Hot water bottle but can't stay still at all, probably nothing to what comes later but it hurts, hope they call back soon.

Edited by member 22 Jan 2015 at 00:13  | Reason: Not specified

Dream like you have forever, live like you only have today Avatar is me racing in the Sahara April 2018

User
Posted 22 Jan 2015 at 02:02
Kev,

Hope you're getting treatment soon. Not right that you are getting so much pain. Try to focus on ignoring the pain as you do when you're nearing the end of a marathon.

Praying that you are sorted soon. There are drinks on the bar in Newark waiting for us !

Steve

User
Posted 22 Jan 2015 at 06:09

Sorry you're in such pain from the stimulation of your bone marrow. (to combat your neutropenia). I think about 40% of people do get bone pain as a side effect. Often it can be managed by paracetamol, as long as your chemo team/ oncology say its OK to take. I hope you got the sister's phone call...it sounds blooming uncomfortable.

I do hope you're feeling a bit better this morning...

Sue

Edited by member 22 Jan 2015 at 09:18  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 22 Jan 2015 at 06:26
Kev

your WBC count is very low indeed at 1.4 a condition called Neutropenia .. very common in high dose chemotherapy I hope your doctor also told you that it is very important that you follow the chemo advice and do not eat fruit that does not have to be peeled, brie and other soft cheese that is made from unpasteurised milk etc etc. during spells of neutropenia you become very prone to infection. The drug you are being given belongs to a group of human growth factors their job is to stimulate bone marrow to produce more white cells for some people this can produce really bad pain usually in the back, hips and long bones of the arms and legs. It can be counter treated with specific pain medication. The slightly better news is that the growth factor is a natural substance and as soon as treatment stops the side effects should go.

It may just be your very fit body reacting strongly to the alien chemo, from the sound of it your Onco has gone for the highest dose and after the first 2 or 3 sessions all of these things may ease off. He may decide to reduce the docetaxel dose a little bit. Is your Oncologist aware that you are still running? you may need to curb back a little until things settle down.

The main thing here is you should not have to suffer, there is pain relief medication that can help.

When you started chemo you should have been given a special booklet with all the numbers to contact in the event of problems. If they do not ring you go to the chemotherapy suite or ward and someone will have to talk to you then!

I will be thinking of you today and wishing you speedy relief.

xx

Mandy Mo

User
Posted 22 Jan 2015 at 07:42

Kev I've taken a look at the info on the Macmillan site and it sounds like the pain is likely to be a side effect of the Zarzio. Makes sense really if the pain started following your first couple of injections. I've tried to put link below

http://m.macmillan.org.uk/article/name/cancerinformation-cancertreatment-treatmenttypes-supportivetherapies-haematopoieticgrowthfactors

bri

Edited by member 22 Jan 2015 at 07:46  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 22 Jan 2015 at 17:37
How's it going Kev?

Better I hope.

Steve

User
Posted 23 Jan 2015 at 14:44
Sorry for the delay in response, following my last post I ended up at A&E, so much pain I could only just walk, my temperature was 38.1. They gave me morphine and about 2 hours later the pain went, I had two types of intravenous antibiotic and a chest X-ray , my blood abc had increased to 2.1 so they sent me home at 5-00 am with co- Codamel. , went to bed till 12-00 then had call from Marsden who were concerned about another blood count and that A&E had not given me further antibiotics. Asked me to come in and then admitted me overnight for 4 more shots of antibiotics and lots of regular blood tests. My consultant agrees that I probably had a bad reaction to the jabs as I have had no pain relief apart from the morphine and have had no pain since my evening in A&E. So I am fine I think, they only panicked because my temp spiked for about an hour and I am convinced that was because I had a hot water bottle strapped to my back and was in so much pain I was white knuckle gripping furniture. Just been told I can go home so that is good news!!!

Dream like you have forever, live like you only have today Avatar is me racing in the Sahara April 2018

User
Posted 23 Jan 2015 at 14:45
Sorry for the delay in response, following my last post I ended up at A&E, so much pain I could only just walk, my temperature was 38.1. They gave me morphine and about 2 hours later the pain went, I had two types of intravenous antibiotic and a chest X-ray , my blood wbc had increased to 2.1 so they sent me home at 5-00 am with co- Codamel. , went to bed till 12-00 then had call from Marsden who were concerned about another blood count and that A&E had not given me further antibiotics. Asked me to come in and then admitted me overnight for 4 more shots of antibiotics and lots of regular blood tests. My consultant agrees that I probably had a bad reaction to the jabs as I have had no pain relief apart from the morphine and have had no pain since my evening in A&E. So I am fine I think, they only panicked because my temp spiked for about an hour and I am convinced that was because I had a hot water bottle strapped to my back and was in so much pain I was white knuckle gripping furniture. Just been told I can go home so that is good news!!!

Edited by member 23 Jan 2015 at 14:46  | Reason: Not specified

Dream like you have forever, live like you only have today Avatar is me racing in the Sahara April 2018

User
Posted 23 Jan 2015 at 15:01
Kev,

Been worried about you, hoping they were sorting you out. Hope you're feeling a bit better now.

I thought they would admit you as you seemed to be in so much pain. It's a bit scary when you just wonder when it is going to stop but at least, when you're in hospital you're in the best place to get sorted.

I hope after the last couple of days you have a really nice weekend.

Hope it gets better for you.

Best Wishes,

Steve

User
Posted 23 Jan 2015 at 17:39
Good news Kev

I am really pleased that you are now home and back on track. Just try and take it a little bit easier I worry that you may be pushing yourself a bit too hard during your chemo.

xx

Mandy Mo

User
Posted 23 Jan 2015 at 20:33

So Glad that you are back home Kev and things are easier but I have to agree with Mandy Mo , taking things a little easier for the time being doesn't mean giving up on your old way of life , it just means taking care of yourself and slowing down for now. These are strong treatments that you are having. Be kind to yourself.

BFN

Julie X

NEVER LAUGH AT A LIVE DRAGON
User
Posted 20 Feb 2015 at 04:50
So in similar words of the great Nikkon Steve, Today is an important day as I am 50.

5 months ago my wife asked what I was doing for my 50th and at that time 50 was just another number, I had plenty more to follow and as nothing was changing I was not that fussed.

Now of course this birthday has significance as with my realistic prognosis this needs to be my 50th, 60th, 70th, 80th and all those in between too only without the special events that go with or around getting older (retirement, grandchildren, kids special birthdays, weddings, graduations etc).

So today I have a good day planned with by best mate, brother and wives (all our wives not multiple for my brother!) but it will be hard not to get sucked into what will probably not be in the years to come.

I know that right now I am in lucky in so far as I feel ok, chemo has so far been kind (too kind perhaps, is the dose not strong enough), I ran 16 miles yesterday in training for the Brighton marathon in 7 weeks, have raised £14k so far for PC UK in the process (which makes me feel it's worthwhile as it may help others) and still have a normal life much of the time but dark thoughts are never that far away.

Reading most posts on this forum I can see that there is both hope and sadness and even with the hope goes much pain and effort along the way. I hope that like many others that staying fit and having an improved diet it will give me the best outcome however I can see that there are no guarantees.

So today is an important day, it will be a good day but due to the PC will have more significance, it may help me enjoy it more of course as time, especially feeling good time is not to be wasted ever again.

Thanks for reading if you got this far, Kev

Dream like you have forever, live like you only have today Avatar is me racing in the Sahara April 2018

User
Posted 20 Feb 2015 at 08:21

Hi Kev,

I just wanted to say that I think you're amazing training for a marathon while having chemo.  

My dad's just been diagnosed with aggressive PC.  He has a Gleason score of 9 and we're just awaiting further scans to see if it's spread.  He is 75 but runs regularly.  He did his last half marathon in October.  One thing that upset him was that he might have to give up running but you have given me hope that maybe he can carry on, but maybe at his age, stick to the 5Ks and 10Ks :)

I've just read through the whole thread and am pleased to hear that after the awful time you had when you first started chemo, you are now doing really well.

I hope you have a really special 50th birthday.  You deserve it!  Look after yourself.

Chardonnay

 

User
Posted 20 Feb 2015 at 08:31

Lovely post Kev. HAPPY BIRTHDAY. You are doing so well keep it going I am still not sure about the running and the chemo together but one thing for sure you are doing it your way and doing it in stylehttp://community.prostatecanceruk.org/editors/tiny_mce/plugins/emoticons/img/smiley-smile.gif

BFN

Julie

NEVER LAUGH AT A LIVE DRAGON
User
Posted 20 Feb 2015 at 09:28
Happy 50th Birthday, Kev.

What a great post! I hope you have a fantastic day. Enjoy every moment. Sorry I can't be there to buy you a drink, perhaps on your 60th? That would give me a great deal of pleasure, for obvious reasons.

I will raise a glass to you this evening. Here's to many more Happy Birthdays !

Remember... Today is the first day of the rest of your life... can't think where I've read that before.

Steve

User
Posted 20 Feb 2015 at 09:30

HAPPY HAPPY BIRTHDAY Kevin.

After all you've been through the past few days it's great that you are better enough to enjoy your milestone, the first of many !!

Best wishes for your special day. I know you will enjoy every minute of it and not just because you feel you have to because you have PC.

We can't control the winds - but we can adjust our sails
User
Posted 20 Feb 2015 at 10:19

Happy birthday Irun - have a lovely day.

Perhaps, as you may not live to be 100, you could cram some extra life in now while you are still fit & healthy ..... take a leaf out of your brother's book and get a few extra wives while you still can!

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

User
Posted 20 Feb 2015 at 10:36
Kev

HAPPY BIRTHDAY or even Happy half centuary better than any England cricketer can achieve right now.

Wonderful post has made me smile as I am doing a 5k run in May with Ness Scott and the twins, expecting Si to be there to chuck revolting paint stuff at us. I ran 2k yesterday and walked the other 3 so each month I need to go up a gear. I could have done this without thinking about it 30 years ago!!

You are tolerating your chemo really well and that is probaby down to you being very fit and having no other medical issues. Positive Mental attitude is also important and I think all athletes have that in bucket loads. I only have to look at Usain Bolt and I get a serious mental attitude and me having a nickname like Mo makes that even more amusing.

Have a fabulous time with your famiy and their many wives and of course with your good Lady too.

xx

Mo

User
Posted 21 Feb 2015 at 01:40
Hi Lynn, sadly? I beat my bro as I am on wife 3 (all my doing) and my bronips on wife 2 however the happiest I have ever been in a relationship. Just got back from wild night out so still behaving like I am 19, football tomorrow eight a few mates Si mire Kaddish behaviour before back to reality of a long run followed by chemo. Thanks did bothering to post, I love this forum as it may not change reality but I never feel alone. Kev

Dream like you have forever, live like you only have today Avatar is me racing in the Sahara April 2018

User
Posted 21 Feb 2015 at 08:01

Happy belated birthday kev...hope the football goes well...I'm just off to the gym then this afternoon j will be on the terraces watching the rugby and knocking Bristol for six...finish off my going to the pub as the house will be full of cooing ladies at a baby shower.....another American folly..

Sounds like you are doing really well

Any advice for a knackered achilles tendon

Bri

User
Posted 21 Feb 2015 at 11:56

Hi Kevin,

I was diagnosed just before my 60th and found myself hospitalised on the actual day due to a bad UTI! So I do know the poignancy of a birthday. Each birthday that has followed is greeted with much enthusiasm and that positivity keeps bringing the birthdays on, soon be by 63rd so managed to survive with bone mets for three years so far which is great. Maintaining your running whilst undergoing chemo says loads about your overall levels of fitness which will help you deal with the down times as well as can be expected. Wonderful fund raising too.

I recall celebrating my fiftieth as it was around 20 years since I had had testicular Cancer and for the first time saw light at the end of the tunnel. Within ten years that light was extinguished but looking at the quality of my birthdays and my life sustains me well and this is so important if you can keep those dark thoughts at bay.

Hope to meet up in June. I know you wanted to get to Newark but were not well enough then. Glad to see you are now thriving much better.

User
Posted 24 Feb 2015 at 21:57
Had my 3rd chemo session today, last 3 weeks trouble free and feel pretty good most of the time however worrying thing was that PSA is now 6.6 up from 3.3 just over a month ago. They had not tested my testosterone so will do so at chemo 4 in 3 weeks. I pointed out that I had started going for a p again a few times at night so they are also sorting out another MRI in the next week.

As a result a bit concerned again , no idea what the outcome would be, my consultant said that if I am still producing testosterone they will need to change biclutamide for something else but my worry is that the zoladex has already stopped working, who knows, would chemo not also reduce PSA?

Consultant also said when asked that zoladex has an 18 month average success rate, I thought it was longer but I guess it's only an average.

Chemo was fine but the jaw jaw has left me more into the unknown.

Any thoughts on any other things I should be doing/getting at this point would be welcome

Serves me right for turning 50 last week and having a good time!

Kev

Dream like you have forever, live like you only have today Avatar is me racing in the Sahara April 2018

User
Posted 24 Feb 2015 at 23:02

Hi Kevin,

I'm really sorry to hear about your PSA rise, especially at a time when you were least expecting it.

I'm pretty much a novice when it comes to PSA levels with various treatments, but I know how worrying a rise can be.  Hopefully, a change of medication will sort things out.  My PSA almost doubled just before I started radiotherapy, so I know how you feel.

You have been such a good friend and always helped me through difficult times with your supportive posts, I only wish that I can do the same for you now.

I just wanted you to know that I wish you all the luck in the world that things will get back on course, you were doing so well with your treatment.  I'm sure it will.

Try not to worry.

Your friend,

Steve

 

Edited by member 24 Feb 2015 at 23:11  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 25 Feb 2015 at 10:20
Hi Kev

Sounds like you are tolerating the chemo really well so far. I can't advise you on the rise in your PSA as Mick's PSA was all over the place through chemo and he was far from a typical case fullstop. I do remember reading a lot of reports about PSA bounce in particular in relation to starting out on Bicultamide. I hope Si, Roy, Rob, Lyn or one of the other regular experieced posters will come on and comment. Have you tried texting Si for a chat?

I am sorry I am not able to offer sage advice but I just want you to know I am thinking of you and wishing you well.

xx

Mo

Kev I just checked back on my journal notes as I had something at the back of my mind. I had recorded this.. chemo 3 due and Mick's PSA has risen which has worried us both, especially as Mick is feeling so much better, however we were assured that this is quite common during the early stages of chemo as the cancer is doing everything it can to fight back against the chemo drugs ...

hope this helps a tiny bit

Edited by member 25 Feb 2015 at 10:37  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 20 Mar 2015 at 20:24
Hi all, I thought I would post this link to show you how I am raising the profile of PC tomorrow. http://mobile.afcwimbledon.co.uk/news/article/kevin-defies-the-odds-2349025.aspx

Dream like you have forever, live like you only have today Avatar is me racing in the Sahara April 2018

User
Posted 20 Mar 2015 at 20:53

Brilliant Kev, you are an inspiration mate.

Im sure you will get to that finish line. Donated and shared on Facebook

Today is a good day mate

Bri

User
Posted 20 Mar 2015 at 21:02
Hi Kevin,

That's really good. Fantastic publicity for the cause. I'm sure you will raise more money in sponsorship for the marathon. I envy you being able to complete. My plans to run the Reading Half Marathon on Sunday had to be shelved months ago when I had the heart attack. My cardiac consultant told me I wouldn't be able to run it and he was right, not fit enough. He said he might agree to me doing it next, providing treatment goes well.

Anyway, have a great day tomorrow and I hope your team wins.

Steve.

User
Posted 20 Mar 2015 at 21:16

Good man Kevlaa,

you were floating around on twitter earlier tonight as well, posted up by the PCUK feed.

All the best

Kevin

User
Posted 20 Mar 2015 at 21:22

Well done Kev, Proud of you mate

Si

Don't deny the diagnosis; try to defy the verdict
User
Posted 20 Mar 2015 at 22:00
Well done and good luck in the Marathon!

Best wishes,

Trish

User
Posted 20 Mar 2015 at 22:43

OMG another super hero, now I see what the running is all about. You see for me it's a bit difficult to get my head around running as I have only done this twice in my life, once was for the 5c Bus along the London rd (heading into Southend)http://community.prostatecanceruk.org/editors/tiny_mce/plugins/emoticons/img/smiley-kiss.gif the other time was when I nearly missed the 5c back in the opposite direction. http://community.prostatecanceruk.org/editors/tiny_mce/plugins/emoticons/img/smiley-kiss.gif

What I am saying is if you are running for a purpose IE you might miss your Bus then I get it, but running for the sake of running this really doesn't make sense to me.http://community.prostatecanceruk.org/editors/tiny_mce/plugins/emoticons/img/smiley-kiss.gif.

I am only joking (not about running for Buses that bit is real ) but WELL DONE YOU. all I can say is , we need runners like you in life the £13000 raised also struck a chord as this was Trevor's starting psa.

So as long as you feel well enough KEEP RUNNING.

BFN

Julie X

 

NEVER LAUGH AT A LIVE DRAGON
User
Posted 20 Mar 2015 at 22:49
Well done Kev you are an inspiration to us all,keep it up.

Roy

User
Posted 21 Mar 2015 at 08:21

Hi Kev,
Hope it all goes really well today, and you have a great day! Thanks for posting the link so we can all see the amazing things that are being done to raise the profile of PCa.
Well done for making a difference,
Miss x

User
Posted 21 Mar 2015 at 09:27

Kevin, it is a great article and the thing that struck me most was that you have a proper best mate and clearly think the world of each other. But I am going to be a bit of a party pooper - with an HR hat on, I wonder did you speak to work about going to matches and completing a marathon while signed off sick? In some companies, this article would be a huge flag to gross misconduct - I hope that your company are supportive?

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

User
Posted 21 Mar 2015 at 09:41

brilliant Kev

another superhero you rock i hope you have a fantastic day. i know you are careful not to push yourself too hard.

xx

mo 

 

 

User
Posted 21 Mar 2015 at 11:14

I think if kev did a manual job some questions may be asked but maybe not.....but he doesn't.

We all know that cancer effects us all individually and we all cope and deal with it individually. It is clear that one of Kev's strategies is running....He even admits himself he may not be well enough when it comes to the day but it's also obvious he is going to do his upmost to do this.

As a manager I would certainly not have any issues with this as it's not just our physical well-being that has to be considered

Bri

User
Posted 21 Mar 2015 at 11:46

Yes Bri but you work in a culture of wellbeing - I think banking may be a different kettle of fish. All I was saying to Kev was had he had that conversation with his employer to avoid getting a stage 1 letter from HR! I worked in local authority, like you, and this would have triggered a disciplinary investigation without a shadow of a doubt, although you would hope the outcome of the investigation would be in the employee's favour.

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

User
Posted 21 Mar 2015 at 12:44

I understand where you are coming from Lyn and if someone was off with an undiagnosed condition for example, I won't give an example or I risk putting my foot in it...then I would question it. But an employee going through chemo for an aggressive cancer I'm not so sure.

But I concede I may be naive regarding other institutions procedures

Bri

User
Posted 21 Mar 2015 at 12:54

I really hope my comment hasn't come across as critical of Kev .... it wasn't meant to be. I just suddenly foresaw a potential problem and wanted to be helpful.

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

User
Posted 21 Mar 2015 at 13:30

No I don't think it did Lyn.
I was just throwing my twopenneth in :)

Anyway, on with the rugby

Bri

User
Posted 21 Mar 2015 at 15:54

You are amazing Kevin and hope all goes well.  Will donate to your page tho you wont recognise the name.http://community.prostatecanceruk.org/editors/tiny_mce/plugins/emoticons/img/smiley-surprised.gif El

User
Posted 22 Mar 2015 at 05:50
Thanks to everyone for their support. Yesterday was a good day with lots of bucket collections going on at the match and the profile of this disease was definitely raised.

To answer Lyn, work are aware about what I am doing, everyone is supportive. Another guy in my team had PC last year G7 and had his removed, took a year out. For me I think that despite my bravado they know that it is very hard and at this moment it is not so much about the physical side of stuff (although it's there in some form most days) but it's the mental side of my prognosis that is more disabilitating. The running is just about the only thing that distracts me from that and makes me think normal. I wake up 5+ times every night, have not slept more than 4 hours non stop since October and am very absent minded at random times during every day. After any kind of sustained effort eg running, going to the shops, sitting to watch football etc I need to do nothing for a couple of hours to recharge. My journey to work is over an hour of trains and tubes then the meetings are more trains/ tubes to client sites so I could not suddenly duck out in the middle if I needed to as am often 3 hours from home, I would not make it back home in one piece. Work is also a haven of grabbing fast food or no food in between stuff which again would have negative outcomes for my overall ability to cope with treatment. Add to all that lot that I spent 3 days at hospital last week, 2 in the coming week etc then my usefulness would be questionable.

I think if I was at work I would be far less healthy and as such be off sick however I do get how some may feel who are not aware. Fortunately I have worked for the same employer for 33 years, been a top performer, am relatively senior, know my direct line managers almost to the top who are all male, older than me and who no doubt are just thankful it is me not them who has this bugger of a disease.

Once I have run the marathon I sense that my body may slow a little bit as the constant semi adrenalin and focus is definitely helping me right now( although it's possible that I will be given a last minute place in the London marathon 2 weeks later if I can handle it!).

I guess I am lucky re my employer is the bottom line as Lyn I think would be spot on for many so a good point for everyone in my situation to consider before being too extrovert about what they are doing.

Kev

Dream like you have forever, live like you only have today Avatar is me racing in the Sahara April 2018

User
Posted 22 Mar 2015 at 08:09
Hi Kevin,

Well done for yesterday, you've helped all of us by your efforts. I think your employer would be proud to have you within their organisation for the determination and strength of character you have shown in fighting this disease. You are a very good advert for the quality of employee they employ. It nice that they acknowledge this.

I'm feeling rather sick because the Reading Half Marathon takes place today. Feel as if I'm missing the party. Still, I'm going to enter a couple of shorter distance races a soon as I'm able.

I'm probably not going to be posting much until I sort certain things out. I've got a feeling that my internet has just been cut off, maybe the phone too and I don't want to use the data limit on my mobile too much because I've already gone over my limit while in hospital. I plan to return to work next weekend and I've just been told that my benefits will stop straight away, it's just the Department of Work & Pensions way of helping you out: to live with no money for a month or so after being on very limited benefits for four months. We've decided to put the house up for sale this week.

Kevin, keep up the fight, you're showing all the way to battle this horrible disease.

Hope to see you in June?

Steve

Edited by member 22 Mar 2015 at 16:15  | Reason: Not specified

 
Forum Jump  
<123>
©2019 Prostate Cancer UK