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urinary sheaths

User
Posted 17 May 2020 at 10:26

Hi,bit embarrassed to ask this....

Im really struggling with the conveen sheaths. The problem is, they go on just fine but after a short while my penis seems to disappear? That means the sheath is only stuck to the skin and starts leaking.

I would really like to get on with these but I have no confidence with them at the moment?

Any suggestions would be welcome,thanks.

User
Posted 17 May 2020 at 13:12

Terry 

Can you provide details of the make and length, possibly product number. 

Thanks Chris

User
Posted 17 May 2020 at 13:18
You shouldn't really be using sheaths so soon after your op - it may impede your recovery of bladder control. Some urologists feel very strongly about it.

No need to be embarrassed about your penis shrinking - it happens to almost all men post-surgery. The sooner you start using a vacuum pump the better as that will help to draw the urethra down. Our urologist said that some men are left with such a short penis they are no longer able to urinate standing up - the bigger your prostate was at removal, the more urethra has to be removed.

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

User
Posted 17 May 2020 at 13:23

Immediately post op and pre sheath my own solution to getting out and about involved a double layer of pads, swiftly changing the inner one as and when required:

Originally Posted by: Online Community Member

I discovered that the Age UK pads for "Men" are clones of the Abri pads I received in my PCaUK post surgery kit. They have handy little flaps down the side that are just the right size to contain the smaller Abri unisex pads. On a long walk I set off with one inside the other. When the unisex one fills up just find a quiet corner and swiftly remove it and place it inside a blue Abri bag, also kindly supplied by PCaUK in their kit. If circumstances allow replace the inner pad with a fresh one. Repeat as often as necessary.

This procedure prevents poor old JT from getting overly soggy, and has the added benefit of deluding casual observers into believing that he is much larger than he really is!

Reality is merely an illusion, albeit a very persistent one - Albert Einstein
User
Posted 17 May 2020 at 14:12

Originally Posted by: Online Community Member

Terry 

Can you provide details of the make and length, possibly product number. 

Thanks Chris

hi Chris they are Conveen Optima 28mm standard length.

Thanks

Terry

User
Posted 17 May 2020 at 14:15

Originally Posted by: Online Community Member
You shouldn't really be using sheaths so soon after your op - it may impede your recovery of bladder control. Some urologists feel very strongly about it.

No need to be embarrassed about your penis shrinking - it happens to almost all men post-surgery. The sooner you start using a vacuum pump the better as that will help to draw the urethra down. Our urologist said that some men are left with such a short penis they are no longer able to urinate standing up - the bigger your prostate was at removal, the more urethra has to be removed.

Hi,how long is too soon? Its been 4 months now.

How often should pump be used?

Thanks

User
Posted 17 May 2020 at 14:38
Sheaths are a good thing for men to try if they are left with permanent (mechanical) incontinence as a result of RP, before they take the step of considering an artificial sling, etc. At 4 months post-op, you are still in the stage of recovery - the NHS data suggests that most men see progress between 3-6 months post-op and that 90% of men are using one pad or less by 12 months. Wearing a sheath may give your brain no motivation to re-learn the signals for bladder control and how to control the external sphincter.

Sheaths may also be useful for a short time for a man who normally wears pads but for some specific reason can't, like going to an important meeting or on a long journey. Around the house, I guess there aren't many reasons but perhaps if you were going to the supermarket and you know that their public toilets are closed so you wouldn't be able to change your pad if soaking wet, a Conveen might be sensible.

Our specialist recommended that the pump should be used in 5 x blocks, three times each day.

"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

User
Posted 17 May 2020 at 14:46

Terry 

I tried the short and the standard ( which is longer) and found to standard was better but it still leaked at times. Are you using the prep wipes. I found pulling the foreskin tight also helped. I also found making sure that the sheath drains properly kept in on better.

My surgeon did not like the use of sheaths, saying it makes men lazy. If you use them as an aid rather than a substitute then I think they are beneficial. When I got the urge to urinate I would stand up and try to urinate as if standing at the toilet. Standing will also aid the drainage and help prevent a build up of pressure. I also wore a pad in case it leaked and it did on a few occasions.

 

Edited by member 17 May 2020 at 14:49  | Reason: Missing word

User
Posted 21 May 2020 at 16:48

Hi,Ive taken your advice and given the sheaths a miss. 

I think your right regarding training the brain again,those wouldnt help.

Thanks

Terry

User
Posted 21 May 2020 at 23:05
I just used the Conveen Sheaths for long journeys while it was difficult to access a toilet as for example being on a 2 hour plus express coach journey without a WC or convenience stop when I needed to pee frequently for a couple of months post RT. I learnt my lesson on a previous trip when I had to get the coach driver to pull over on a motorway while I watered some bushes!
Barry
 
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