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Worry about meeting the consultant on Monday

User
Posted 20 May 2022 at 07:17
It doesn't really take all day. Removing the catheter takes about 2 seconds 😁. You then, though, have to drink lots of water and show that you're able to pass water (three times in my case) before they let you go. It's that part of the process that tends to take several hours.

Glad to hear that the surgery went well.

All the best,

Chris

User
Posted 20 May 2022 at 08:27

DW, hope all goes well with the recovery, make sure he takes it easy but keeps mobile. It is good to avoid getting constipation and no straining to pass that first motion.

I have had around 12 trial without catheter and never failed.  Mine never took longer than five hours, usually they have been around three hours. To speed things up I drink plenty of water before getting to the hospital, I find that if i am well hydrated before getting to the hospital the water they give me to drink at the TWOC passes through me far quicker. It is better to leak a bit than have a catheter put back in because you failed the TWOC.

Make sure you have some pads, the hospital will normally give you some, but as a work colleague used to say better to be looking at some than looking for some. I took a towel and cover for the car seat in case of a "major" leak but it never happened. I also had a urine bottle in the car in case of an emergency. The towel is useful if stuck in a traffic jam with a coachload of people at the side of you😀. A spare pair of trousers and pants, again never needed. Elasticated waist trousers make it very easy to change the pad in a hurry. 

Hope all goes well.

Thanks Chris

 

Edited by member 20 May 2022 at 09:24  | Reason: Spelling

User
Posted 20 May 2022 at 11:33

DW, don't be surprised if he bypasses a little urine and a trace of blood out of the the penis. It often happened to me when passing a motion, a bit of tissue under the penis while sat on the toilet helps save wet underwear.  I was told Rosé colour in the bag should be okay but red wine colour needs attention. Don't forget to adk for some instilagel in case the catheter makes the penis sore. 

 

Get a couple of extra thigh straps, use one around your ankle to secure the night bag tube when in bed, it saves putting any strain on the bag joint. Make sure the catheter joints are tight, and make sure the leg bag tap is shut before disconnecting the night bag and don't forget to open the leg bag tap when you attach the night bag.

 

The extra thigh straps are useful when showering. I empty my bag a let it hang on the thigh strap ,when i finish showering I put a dry strap on the other leg and transfer the catheter and bag to the dry strap. Some hospitals use adhesive catheter fixation devices so the strap idea would not apply , the statlock adhesive device id waterproof, they should be changed after 7 days but will last for 14 days.

 

Make sure you empty your day bag before it gets more than half full. 

Thanks Chris

Edited by member 20 May 2022 at 11:40  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 20 May 2022 at 16:13

Originally Posted by: Online Community Member
Mine took over five hours. It was nerve sparing one side

Cheers
Bill

Sorry  I should have been  clear the RARP took over 5 hours

The TWOC was done by the district nurse. She came round in the morning, I actually removed it myself under her supervision because I wanted full control if there was pain or resistance while getting through the new anastomosis. She left a log sheet and I recorded quantity of water in and water out then she returned later that day to check urine left in bladder after a pee with ultrasound. 

Good luck to your OH with his

Cheers

Bill

Edited by member 20 May 2022 at 17:43  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 20 May 2022 at 18:32

Glad the op is all over. Not too bad 3 months from diagnosis to treatment. I assume TWOC is about two weeks time. A catheter isn't much fun, though I found it quite useful when at the pub. Hope all goes well.

Dave

User
Posted 20 May 2022 at 23:15
Glad the op is over. Small steps now and wishing you both well x
User
Posted 21 May 2022 at 08:27

Absolutely not! My hubby and I (who is now 74) have had a very active life post his treatment. His PSA was 87 at diagnosis and he required radiotherapy and hormone therapy. Since then we’ve largely managed to enjoy active lives - we don’t fly as much as unfortunately his bowels were affected by radiotherapy so we go on cruises instead. 
with regards impotence- it’s taken nearly 9 years for hubby to accept help from a nurse specialist- I don’t think we were really supported by the first hospital that treated him, but now getting loads of support. 

User
Posted 21 May 2022 at 12:21

Wish the urologist had never mentioned RARP, OH is still stuck in hospital, he is in utter despair, they are not letting me see him and they are not doing anything for his mental health.  He was supposed to come home yesterday, delayed due to a slightly raised temperature.  He does not think he is going to come home today as apparently they have been waiting for his medications since this morning.

What an utter nightmare. 

User
Posted 21 May 2022 at 14:02

Trying to get discharged on a weekend is a nightmare. I went in Friday before a bank holiday and was due out Saturday. I had a minor problem and it was looking like they were going to keep me in until Tuesday just because there was no senior doctor to sign me out. Fortunately it was resolved and I got out in the afternoon.

Dave

User
Posted 21 May 2022 at 14:07

If his temperature is raised, that could indicate an infection, in which case he will be better off in hospital where it can be properly treated. Hospitals are full of pathogens! But his prostate is no longer there, so his cancer is no longer there, and the oncologists can look at it and make a fuller evaluation of how developed it was. So, reason to be cheerful ...?

As to not letting you see him, I thought the rules had been changed nationally to stop hospitals from preventing family members from visiting patients? I might be wrong about that, but I feel that I read that somewhere weeks ago, and if you can show that you are covid-free ....? https://www.sth.nhs.uk/visitors/visiting-times

Hospital pharmacies are notoriously slow in delivering medicines. I was in hospital with Lyme disease some years ago, and it took 4 hours for the pharmacy to deliver my month's supply of doxycyclin before I could be released! It's usually too few staff, too many patients needing drugs.

Edited by member 21 May 2022 at 14:24  | Reason: typos! I can spell, I just can't type.

User
Posted 21 May 2022 at 14:12
DW that is not a nightmare, the real nightmares can still happen ...
User
Posted 21 May 2022 at 14:46

My husband stayed in an extra day but it actually worked out well as he was a bit further on with recovery when he came home, so I didn’t have to worry quite as much. If your husband comes home with a temperature surely that would cause concern for you both, he’ll definitely be better where they can look after him. I know it’s really difficult if they won’t let you see him though. We just had to video call and on one occasion I walked to the hospital and waved to him at the window while speaking on the phone ❤️ Hope he’s home and well soon, best of luck with recovery 

User
Posted 21 May 2022 at 17:07

Hi Hermit of Eyam, the rules have been changed, but just because the rules have changed does not mean that hospitals follow those rules.  On our hospital web-site it said I can visit him for 1h/day but they only apply that to wards like maternity etc.  

But what really is confusing is that yesterday I was not allowed to visit him but today I was invited onto the ward to go through all the discharge papers and medicines with OH and a nurse prior to pick up sitting in his room 

User
Posted 21 May 2022 at 17:09

francij1, I know that an awful lot can still go wrong in the next 10 or 20 years 

 

User
Posted 24 May 2022 at 16:28
I hope someone is looking after you too DW xx sending love
User
Posted 24 May 2022 at 20:02
I'm not sure why an extra day in hospital would be a nightmare? Surely it's better to make sure that any potential infection is dealt with before he's discharged, isn't it? I quite enjoyed being in hospital, strange though it may sound!

Hope things are better now?

All the best,

Chris

User
Posted 25 May 2022 at 05:54

Hi Chris, food was one issue and OH really wanted to come home as he did not get any sleep there - each time he fell asleep nurses woke him up to take his temperature/blood pressure etc.   

User
Posted 18 Jun 2022 at 17:59
Hi, OH had the catheter removed 1st June. Totally dry at night but getting very frustrated during the day. Needs 2 to 3large pads depending on how active he is and he really likes to be active. He does PFs regularly. Any advice how to help him? Thank you
User
Posted 18 Jun 2022 at 19:21
He needs to be patient - there isn’t any magic thing that will speed up recovery. If he is dry at night, there is no mechanical damage so it is just about his brain relearning bladder control.
"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard

User
Posted 18 Jun 2022 at 22:36

I was probably about the same at that stage after catheter removal. A long walk would gradually cause my bladder virtually  empty  Being on your feet and active for long periods (walking,  gardening etc) are the hardest hardest to master. I'm now eight weeks down the road. I'm not there yet but I'm still gradually improving. I can now do a 12 mile walk and not worry about a pad change. I do all my pelvic floors in the standing position. I think that helps. Chris.

User
Posted 19 Jun 2022 at 09:45

After my catheter was removed it took about 8 weeks before my daily incontinence greatly improved. As mentioned by Chris, going for a long walk resulted in me having virtually no bladder control at all.Each leg forward movement resulted in a leak and meant that when I returned home my pad was soaking wet and my bladder probably completely empty. And as mentioned by Lyn, and as advised by the specialist nurse assigned to me, the brain needs to relearn how to control the bladder following the damage to that area. It is frustrating, but for me and for the people I personally  know that have undergone surgery, virtually full bladder control does eventually return. In my case it was an almost overnight experience after about 10 or so weeks when my continence improved to 99 % plus . I only leak a little now when I am lifting a very heavy object.

 

Ivan

 
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