I'm interested in conversations about and I want to talk about
Know exactly what you want?
Show search

Notification

Error

Leakage strategy

User
Posted 22 Nov 2023 at 11:42

Had my catheter removed about a week ago following RARP. Pretty dry already, which obviously is a huge relief, but I do get a bit of leakage when I stand up from sitting.


I'm doing my pelvic floor exercises religiously. I'm now wondering whether it would be best to go for a pee little and often, or to wait until I'm desperate in order to make the muscles work harder. Any views as to which approach will be better, or whether it won't make much difference.


Thoughts please. Thanks. 

User
Posted 22 Nov 2023 at 14:32

Originally Posted by: Online Community Member


I'm now wondering whether it would be best to go for a pee little and often, or to wait until I'm desperate in order to make the muscles work harder.



Aim for somewhere in between and always tighten the pelvic floor muscle when you go from sitting to standing.


 


Thanks Chris 

User
Posted 22 Nov 2023 at 21:11
Aoxomoxoa (don't know what it means but it is nicely palindromic) you need to bear in mind that most of us answering questions on this forum have only the limited experience of ourselves (or our partners) and possibly the odd similarly afflicted friend. Whereas the doctors and nurses meet multiple patients each day and can give a more representative reply.

But having said that, I largely agree with Steve. Because the operation has damaged the sphincters that normally stop you leaking, anything that needs the sphincters to work hard tends to tire them out and leave you a bit leaky for the rest of the day - but at the same time you need them to be working them hard enough to be building up muscle strength. One example is a full bladder, another is doing things that involve your abdominal muscles which raise the pressure in your abdomen and tend to "squeeze" urine out. Basically, what you are trying to do is train what is left of your sphincters to do their job well enough to leave you dry - which means doing the pelvic floor squeeses but also withstanding a fullish bladder and coping with everyday abdominal muscle use like standing up from sitting (and those winter coughs).

Going out though isn't the time to train, particularly in those early weeks! By making sure you start with an empty bladder and making use of any available toilets (I became expert on which shops have toilets!) you will feel more confident and motivated to work on your continence,

Good luck!
User
Posted 22 Nov 2023 at 21:20

Aoxomoxo.


This is my experience which you may find helpful but we are all different.


It is very early days - take it easy with everything. Once you have healed, depending on your recovery, you should gradually 'train' you bladder and your mind to wait and see if you can hold it a little longer - that is what my urologist advised me. I followed his advice. I had serious issues with frequency and urgency before surgery but now (12 years since surgery) I no longer think or worry about it - that is one of some other side effects of prostatectomy that I am lucky to enjoy now. Good luck.

 'Physics is like sex: sure, it may give some practical results, but that’s not why we do it.'                    Richard Feynman (1918-1988) Nobel Prize laureate


 


 

User
Posted 22 Nov 2023 at 23:03

Originally Posted by: Online Community Member
Aoxomoxoa (don't know what it means but it is nicely palindromic) you need to bear in mind that most of us answering questions on this forum have only the limited experience of ourselves (or our partners) and possibly the odd similarly afflicted friend. Whereas the doctors and nurses meet multiple patients each day and can give a more representative reply.

But having said that, I largely agree with Steve. Because the operation has damaged the sphincters that normally stop you leaking, anything that needs the sphincters to work hard tends to tire them out and leave you a bit leaky for the rest of the day - but at the same time you need them to be working them hard enough to be building up muscle strength. One example is a full bladder, another is doing things that involve your abdominal muscles which raise the pressure in your abdomen and tend to "squeeze" urine out. Basically, what you are trying to do is train what is left of your sphincters to do their job well enough to leave you dry - which means doing the pelvic floor squeeses but also withstanding a fullish bladder and coping with everyday abdominal muscle use like standing up from sitting (and those winter coughs).

Going out though isn't the time to train, particularly in those early weeks! By making sure you start with an empty bladder and making use of any available toilets (I became expert on which shops have toilets!) you will feel more confident and motivated to work on your continence,

Good luck!


 


Thanks for the considered reply, much appreciated. 


 


Aoxomoxoa, as well as being a great palindrome, is the title of a Grateful Dead album from 1969.

Show Most Thanked Posts
User
Posted 22 Nov 2023 at 12:48

Hello mate, I was wondering how you were doing. 👍


https://community.prostatecanceruk.org/posts/t29948-Where-and-when-in-the-day-to-do-the-Pelvic-Floor-exercises


Is a similar thread where I've made comment.


I can remember, nine months ago, having my catheter removed. They wouldn't let me go until I gave a couple of pee samples. I wanted to leave asap, so, like a fool, I drank 2 one and a half litre jugs of water to expediate my release.


I started peeing uncontrollably at the hospital car park pay station and didn't finish for the entire 15 miles journey home. I had to cover my seat with plastic shopping bags from the boot. That reminds me I must give them a wash. 😉


Adrian.


 

Edited by member 22 Nov 2023 at 13:03  | Reason: Not specified

User
Posted 22 Nov 2023 at 14:32

Originally Posted by: Online Community Member


I'm now wondering whether it would be best to go for a pee little and often, or to wait until I'm desperate in order to make the muscles work harder.



Aim for somewhere in between and always tighten the pelvic floor muscle when you go from sitting to standing.


 


Thanks Chris 

User
Posted 22 Nov 2023 at 16:18
I found keeping a full bladder better when I wasn't going anywhere or meeting people and then, when peeing, practising stopping and restarting the flow a couple of times.
If I am heading out for shopping etc then frequent emptying of the bladder wherever there is an opportunity was best for me to keep any accidents down - although I never really released more than a dribble even when coughing or sneezing.
User
Posted 22 Nov 2023 at 20:44

In the early days, my surgeon told me not to wait until bursting as this put undue pressure on the various healing wounds. 

User
Posted 22 Nov 2023 at 21:11
Aoxomoxoa (don't know what it means but it is nicely palindromic) you need to bear in mind that most of us answering questions on this forum have only the limited experience of ourselves (or our partners) and possibly the odd similarly afflicted friend. Whereas the doctors and nurses meet multiple patients each day and can give a more representative reply.

But having said that, I largely agree with Steve. Because the operation has damaged the sphincters that normally stop you leaking, anything that needs the sphincters to work hard tends to tire them out and leave you a bit leaky for the rest of the day - but at the same time you need them to be working them hard enough to be building up muscle strength. One example is a full bladder, another is doing things that involve your abdominal muscles which raise the pressure in your abdomen and tend to "squeeze" urine out. Basically, what you are trying to do is train what is left of your sphincters to do their job well enough to leave you dry - which means doing the pelvic floor squeeses but also withstanding a fullish bladder and coping with everyday abdominal muscle use like standing up from sitting (and those winter coughs).

Going out though isn't the time to train, particularly in those early weeks! By making sure you start with an empty bladder and making use of any available toilets (I became expert on which shops have toilets!) you will feel more confident and motivated to work on your continence,

Good luck!
User
Posted 22 Nov 2023 at 21:20

Aoxomoxo.


This is my experience which you may find helpful but we are all different.


It is very early days - take it easy with everything. Once you have healed, depending on your recovery, you should gradually 'train' you bladder and your mind to wait and see if you can hold it a little longer - that is what my urologist advised me. I followed his advice. I had serious issues with frequency and urgency before surgery but now (12 years since surgery) I no longer think or worry about it - that is one of some other side effects of prostatectomy that I am lucky to enjoy now. Good luck.

 'Physics is like sex: sure, it may give some practical results, but that’s not why we do it.'                    Richard Feynman (1918-1988) Nobel Prize laureate


 


 

User
Posted 22 Nov 2023 at 23:03

Originally Posted by: Online Community Member
Aoxomoxoa (don't know what it means but it is nicely palindromic) you need to bear in mind that most of us answering questions on this forum have only the limited experience of ourselves (or our partners) and possibly the odd similarly afflicted friend. Whereas the doctors and nurses meet multiple patients each day and can give a more representative reply.

But having said that, I largely agree with Steve. Because the operation has damaged the sphincters that normally stop you leaking, anything that needs the sphincters to work hard tends to tire them out and leave you a bit leaky for the rest of the day - but at the same time you need them to be working them hard enough to be building up muscle strength. One example is a full bladder, another is doing things that involve your abdominal muscles which raise the pressure in your abdomen and tend to "squeeze" urine out. Basically, what you are trying to do is train what is left of your sphincters to do their job well enough to leave you dry - which means doing the pelvic floor squeeses but also withstanding a fullish bladder and coping with everyday abdominal muscle use like standing up from sitting (and those winter coughs).

Going out though isn't the time to train, particularly in those early weeks! By making sure you start with an empty bladder and making use of any available toilets (I became expert on which shops have toilets!) you will feel more confident and motivated to work on your continence,

Good luck!


 


Thanks for the considered reply, much appreciated. 


 


Aoxomoxoa, as well as being a great palindrome, is the title of a Grateful Dead album from 1969.

 
Forum Jump  
©2024 Prostate Cancer UK