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Critical illness cover

User
Posted 20 June 2014 13:19:04(UTC)
Hi all,

I took a small insurance policy out against critical illness in the eighties when I had my first mortgage. It's not a lot of money at all & includes the small print 'excludes small, local & treatable cancers'.

I'm having a radical prostatectomy. Anyone have any luck with these in our condition? I'm thinking of not bothering to be fair, I'm sure they will hang their hat on something so they don't have to pay out at all.

Cheers! Carlos


Life's a Marathon. Run in peace.
User
Posted 21 November 2016 21:58:23(UTC)
Hi all

I contacted Aviva on a Wednesday evening about my CI policy. By first thing the next Monday morning, they phoned to tell me they were paying out in full. It was a relatively old policy and although it did have exclusions, they were not as tightly defined as a more recent policy I have. I was lucky in that my GP had printed me up my hospital report. I sent that to Aviva, they phoned my Specialist Uro-Oncology nurse for confirmation and very quickly agreed to pay up. Less than a week is impressive. The other thing was I had two named people at Aviva who were just the nicest people to deal with.

A second policy is being assessed by Legal and General. I took it out in 2012 and wording for exclusions is much tighter. The cancer must be T3 or Gleason 7. Sadly, I meet both criteria. I am therefore hopeful they too will pay up.

It isn't like winning the lottery though. The money brings a bit of financial security in an uncertain time and some peace of mind.

I'd advise anyone with a policy to talk to their insurers to see if they meet the criteria for a settlement.

Walter

Thanked 1 time
User
Posted 22 November 2016 12:04:13(UTC)
Mine was a Gleason 7 , also had it removed. No issues with the pay out, I got the impression anything above a 7 is considered serious enough for a claim .

Johny
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User
Posted 22 November 2016 15:45:29(UTC)
If my husband gets paid out it defiantly won't feel like a lottery win , but it will take another worry away .my husbands Gleason score is 7 -and have a prosectomy in the next 2 weeks . I have forwarded all our letter we have recieved from the hospital so far . So a case of now waiting .
Thank you for your replies
Thanked 1 time
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User
Posted 20 June 2014 18:44:02(UTC)

Its worth inquiring with your insurance company. My next door neighbour deals with such policies amongst others. When I got my cancer he asked me whether I had critical illness. His company does pay out but I believe its down to staging and gleeson etc. You need to check the small print.

 

Eddie

Living life to the full, there is always someone worse of than yourself. Smile and get on with it.
User
Posted 20 June 2014 18:49:44(UTC)

Hi Carlos I would look into it if I was you I have been paid out by insurance company on critical illness, I applied after seeing a post on this site where a member was commenting that he  had been paid by his insurance company

frank

User
Posted 21 June 2014 00:12:03(UTC)
My husband was turned down on the basis that it was treatable. He was also rejected when it returned two years later and he needed salvage treatment.
"Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards." Soren Kierkegaard


User
Posted 21 June 2014 06:28:13(UTC)
Worth trying. My 38 year old daughter was paid out for her colorectal cancer and that was treatable by operation and colostomy bag. They also got paid out for their 13 year old son's cancer which was inoperable but treatable although at the time the outcome was uncertain.
Don't ask - don't get
Good luck
We can't control the winds - but we can adjust our sails
User
Posted 21 June 2014 09:07:23(UTC)
Certainly a lesson to be learned about reading the small print

Bri
User
Posted 21 June 2014 11:09:23(UTC)
Had another thought regarding this.
IF you claim now following RP and the insurance company Oks it.

Will that complete the cover? For instance, and heaven forbid, but would it mean that at some horrible stage in the future if a critical condition appears, the first claim means the policy is now void.?

If not, would the policy pay out again on Prostate cancer.

Would it pay out again if the critical illness wasn't prostate cancer?

What if, at some stage in the future, you are not as financially secure as you are now, could that possible pay out be more of a help then than it is now.

Probably talking out of the back of my head but maybe something to ponder perhaps
We can't control the winds - but we can adjust our sails
User
Posted 21 June 2014 19:05:59(UTC)

Just to say I claimed on my policy as soon as I was diagnosed the wording on the policy stipulated that ,the claim was paid out in full and the policy finished,I suspect that's how it would be for any critical policy,I've never tried to get another it was  to cover the mortgage taken out back in the 80's.

User
Posted 21 June 2014 19:08:17(UTC)

Originally Posted by: Online Community Member
Hi all,

I took a small insurance policy out against critical illness in the eighties when I had my first mortgage. It's not a lot of money at all & includes the small print 'excludes small, local & treatable cancers'.

 

Hmmm,nice bit of wording,aren't all cancers treatable even if maybe not successful.

User
Posted 22 June 2014 16:09:49(UTC)
Thanks all.

I've filled in the paperwork & sent it off. It's only for the balance of my mortgage & the final payment is November so only a couple of thousand. Would be nice though & pay for the inevitable boiler replacement as the current one is as old as the house and almost 25.

Every morning, whilst putting the kettle on & letting the dog out, I check in the utility room, see the old boilers flame burning & give the old girl a kiss. I do the same to the boiler too!

Fingers crossed.

Thanks again guys


Life's a Marathon. Run in peace.
User
Posted 09 August 2015 05:44:13(UTC)
Hi all,

Just put a claim in for myself, be interesting to see what the result is, seams like some get paid some don't.

Il keep you informed, the drinks are on me if I do, mind you you will have to bring your own pads !

Johny
User
Posted 09 August 2015 08:12:14(UTC)

I claimed against my CI policy, paid out in full within 8 weeks of being diagnosed, paid off a massive lump of the mortgage. No quibble, as soon as they got the medical forms back, they agreed the claim the same day. My policy was taken out in 2000 and a lot of the definitions have been tightened up since then as my exclusions made no mention of staging or Gleason scores....nice to have something go my way for a change.....

User
Posted 09 August 2015 08:15:37(UTC)
Originally Posted by: Online Community Member

I claimed against my CI policy, paid out in full within 8 weeks of being diagnosed, paid off a massive lump of the mortgage. No quibble, as soon as they got the medical forms back, they agreed the claim the same day. My policy was taken out in 2000 and a lot of the definitions have been tightened up since then as my exclusions made no mention of staging or Gleason scores....nice to have something go my way for a change.....




Hasn't to add, but i'm still to see the oncologist (24th of this month) and they paid out in advance of any treatment.
User
Posted 04 September 2015 12:45:07(UTC)
Hi, I had 2 separate policies and they both paid out. The magic number as the last post indicates is Gleeson 7 or higher. I think they take the view that gleeson 6 is "not serious" (I am not trying to start a debate here as to what is). Just a point to note, "critical illness" clauses are usually part of life insurance policies and are triggered if one only has a year or so to live therefore effectively paying out the death cover early in case anyone is confused by that. Historically stand alone policies for cancer/stroke/blindness etc were called "serious illness" policies and were/are sold on the basis that you may well live for 5+ years after the claim but may need money to adjust thungs in life.
Kev
Dream like you have forever, live like you only have today
Avatar is northern lights whilst running in Iceland sept 2017
User
Posted 04 September 2015 14:34:34(UTC)

This is the latest "best practice" from the ABI on how CI should be defined....

https://www.abi.org.uk/~/media/Files/Documents/Publications/Public/2014/Protection/Statement%20of%20Best%20Practice%20for%20Critical%20Illness%20Cover%20Dec%202014.pdf


A lot of the older policies have significantly looser definitions i.e. cancer excluding those associated with HIV etc....

D

User
Posted 15 October 2015 23:42:20(UTC)
Originally Posted by: Online Community Member
Certainly a lesson to be learned about reading the small print

Bri


Too true!

Whilst sorting out and organising my 'important' paperwork, I discovered I had CI cover in an endowment that I had left running after paying off the mortgage a couple of years back. Previously I thought it only had death benefit.

I also discovered it had a '6 month after diagnosis' time limit on claims. Luckily I found this out at 5 1/2 months!...

It didn't mention Gleason or Staging, but one exclusion was cancer 'in-situ'...

Took them a couple of months, but they've just paid out in full :)

Moral of the story: If you think you might have cover, check it NOW, before it's too late!
User
Posted 16 October 2015 06:07:49(UTC)

That's good news and it's nice to see them paying out without too much of a fight...

User
Posted 02 December 2015 11:13:54(UTC)

Just a few thoughts to add to this:  I have CI cover arranged as an optional benefit through a scheme sponsored by my employer, administered by Scottish Widows. In the small print is the key sentence 'To make a claim you must call Scottish Widows for a claim form ... within 21 days of being diagnosed for the first time' (my italics / bold formatting).  That is awfully fast, although it does go on to say 'If you have not been able to notify us by then please still contact us as we may still be able to consider your claim.'

When I was diagnosed in the summer it all happened so fast, and it was just that I was sat at home feeling sorry for myself that I decided to look up to see what the claim process was.  Thankfully it was only about 18 days after diagnosis, but it was getting close to the wire!  Fortunately, the claim form was simple, and the copy of the letter from my consultant to my GP had all the info they needed, and they paid out.

As has been posted above, they will not pay out for prostate cancer if it is 'Histologically classified as having a Gleason score below 7 and TNM classification below T2bNOMO that are treated only by observation, surveillance and/or surgical biopsy' or 'Classified as TisNOMO or Prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN)'. 

When they rang me to say that they would pay on the claim they added that whilst I could continue the CI cover, they would not pay out for anything that might be considered related to the original condition.  In practice that makes it very unlikely that they would pay out if I was diagnosed with any other kind of cancer (they may take the view that one led to the other), and if I was to suffer a heart attack which might be linked to any medication I was taking as a result of my treatment for PC that too would probably be excluded.  as a result I may not be continuing with the cover.

The key thing for me is therefore always read the small print, and don't waste any time in making a claim.

User
Posted 21 November 2016 21:42:56(UTC)
Hi could I ask please the ones who have been successful did you have a Gleason score of 7 or more and did you have the prostate removed ?

Thank you
User
Posted 21 November 2016 21:58:23(UTC)
Hi all

I contacted Aviva on a Wednesday evening about my CI policy. By first thing the next Monday morning, they phoned to tell me they were paying out in full. It was a relatively old policy and although it did have exclusions, they were not as tightly defined as a more recent policy I have. I was lucky in that my GP had printed me up my hospital report. I sent that to Aviva, they phoned my Specialist Uro-Oncology nurse for confirmation and very quickly agreed to pay up. Less than a week is impressive. The other thing was I had two named people at Aviva who were just the nicest people to deal with.

A second policy is being assessed by Legal and General. I took it out in 2012 and wording for exclusions is much tighter. The cancer must be T3 or Gleason 7. Sadly, I meet both criteria. I am therefore hopeful they too will pay up.

It isn't like winning the lottery though. The money brings a bit of financial security in an uncertain time and some peace of mind.

I'd advise anyone with a policy to talk to their insurers to see if they meet the criteria for a settlement.

Walter

Thanked 1 time
User
Posted 22 November 2016 12:04:13(UTC)
Mine was a Gleason 7 , also had it removed. No issues with the pay out, I got the impression anything above a 7 is considered serious enough for a claim .

Johny
Thanked 1 time
User
Posted 22 November 2016 15:45:29(UTC)
If my husband gets paid out it defiantly won't feel like a lottery win , but it will take another worry away .my husbands Gleason score is 7 -and have a prosectomy in the next 2 weeks . I have forwarded all our letter we have recieved from the hospital so far . So a case of now waiting .
Thank you for your replies
Thanked 1 time
User
Posted 15 December 2017 16:54:34(UTC)

Smudge, not helpful to enter your details twice. It will lead to confusion. Suggest you delete this entry.

AC

 
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